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Maryland Room 
University of Maryland Library 




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jme XXXVI Number One 


• January-February 1964 










• 


Highlights of the Annum. Report 






• 


Maryland Girls 






• 


University Appoints New Alumni Director 






• 


University Singers Leave on Tour 




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magazine 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



Volume XXXVI 



Number 1 



laryland 




The Cover: As they boarded their jet to begin a four month t( ur ol the 
Middle East and Europe, the Univers.iv Singers were wished a successful 
and safe journey by President Elkins. The President and the ( onductOl 
of the Singers, Rose Marie Grcntzer, are shown here prioj to embarkation 
For the Singers' itinerary, turn to Page 19. Other features ol interest 
include the one concerning the University's annual report which will 
the alumni reader some feeling of the size and mission of their school 
The reader might also check the photo album on panes 14 and 15- best 
evidence that Spring has arrived! 



2 



Highlights of the Annual Report 



10 



Inside Maryland Sports 



j Alumni and Campus Notes 

[ 4 Maryland Girls 



[ Q University Appoints New Alumni Di 



rector 



1 Q University Singers Leave for Mideast- 
** S European Tour 

2\j Through the Years 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

RICHARD W. CASE, Assistant Treasurer 

DR. WILLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

WILLIAM C WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



DR. EDWARD D. STONE, '25, President 

MRS. ERNA R. CHAPMAN, '34, Vice-President 

THE HONORABLE JOSEPH L. CARTER, '25. Vice-President 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

ROBERTSON LEACH 
826 W. 40th Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21211 
Telephone: Belmont 5-8302 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park. Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879.-S3.00 per year-Fifty cents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 



HIGHLIGHTS of the 




Recording the major events of the year in which the University^ 
became the 12th largest university system in the nation. 



During the past five years (1957-1962), the instructional 
program at College Park has increased . . . well above the 
national average. . . . In the fall of 1963, the enrollment 
at College Park increased by 2,260 students, which was 
approximately 1,000 more than were projected on the basis 
of all known factors. . . . Now, we face a substantial rise in 
the number of high school graduates which will continue 
for several years. . . . This . . . presents an awesome prospect 
for the University. 

From the President's Letter of Transmittal to the 
Governor and Members of the General Assembly 

the Maryland Magazine 









The 

Enrollment 

Crisis 

is Here 



rHE ENROLLMENT CRISIS OF THE SIXTIES IS HERE now! 
Emerging from many sections of this report are facts 
nd statistics which clearly indicate that the long-heralded 
dal wave of eligible college students is a present reality, 
ot a distant projection on an enrollment chart. 

This emergency suggests a need for the priority attention 
f responsible University educators, lawmakers and public 
fticials to provide prompt solutions to meet the vastly 
xpanded requirements of Maryland's new college-age 
opulation no later than 1966. 

Solutions which may help by 1970 are simply not ade- 
uate if the State (including the University) is to keep 
rith with thousands of Free State families whose young- 
:ers will be ready for higher education beginning now 
nd carrying through the years ahead. 

During 1963, conforming to legislation passed by the 
ist General Assembly, the University of Maryland 
eveloped plans for a branch campus to serve Baltimore 
bunty and Baltimore City on State-owned land trans- 
:rred to it by the Board of Public Works. Even the most 
ipid implementation of this campus by the 1964 General 
.ssembly still means that students can not be accommo- 
ated there until September, 1966. 

Any delay postpones the opening date in time units of 
le year, during a period when 40,000 youth will be 
raduating annually from Maryland high schools. 

This is the measure of the urgent problem which now 
Mifronts the State. 

Highlight quotations from this Annual Report follow: 

"During the past five years (1957-1962), the instruc- 
anal program at College Park has increased . . . well 
hove the national average. ... In the fall of 1963, the 
irollment at College Park increased by 2,260 students, 
hich was approximately 1,000 more than were projected 
l the basis of all known factors. . . . Now, we face a 
ibstantial rise in the number of high school graduates 
hich will continue for several years. . . . This . . . 
•esents an awesome prospect for the University." 



"The University of Maryland registered during the 
gular (1962-63) academic year 39 percent of all full- 
Tie undergraduates, and 57 percent of all graduate stu- 
:nts enrolled throughout the State. . . . exclusive of the 
nited States Naval Academy." 

— Section on Instruction 



"The University of Maryland is listed as the 12th largest 
liversity system ( 1962) in the nation (by the U. S. Office 

Education). ... in 1956, the University ranked 21st. 
"It is interesting to note that the large majority of those 
stitutions listed in the top eleven have multiple branches 

centers of the parent institution. 

— Section on Administration 



"The constant increase in enrollment places demands on 
library service equallj as great as the demands on the 

instructional program." 

— Si ( iion <>\ I iisi< \ ki i s 



"In the current national atmosphere of constant change, 
there is as much of a knowledge explosion as there is a 
population explosion. . . . more scientific information has 
been acquired in the past twentj years than in all pre- 
vious history." 

— Section on Ki si u<< h 



Few enterprises can report a growth equivalent to our 
56 percent increase in enrollment in the past five-year 
period . . . even with this growth, however, more than 400 
students had to be placed on a dormitory waiting list 
(which size) exceeds the total enrollment oi many of our 
smaller colleges throughout the United States." 

— Section on Student Si k\ k i s 



"During the past two years, a re-orientation of Exten- 
sion programs has been undertaken to serve the changing 
audiences which Extension should reach . . . bringing 
Extension education to the farms, homes, industries and 
organizations of the entire State." 

— Section on the Cooperative Extension Ser\ k i 



"During 1962-63 ... a survey of all sheep Hocks in the 
State was carried out, with the cooperation o( Count} 
extension personnel, practicing veterinarians and regula- 
tory officials to determine the presence of sheep scabies. 
Only a few cases were found. After their proper treat- 
ment, Maryland was declared a scab-free state by the 
Secretary of Agriculture of the United States. 

— Section on Public Si rvici s 



"The University can point to significant accomplish- 
ments by the Department of Physical Plant (whose com- 
bined responsibilities at College Park and Baltimore repre- 
sent the largest requirement for facility maintenance of an\ 
State-supported installation in Maryland). In each in- 
stance, the tasks have been achieved with substantial!) 
fewer personnel than are utilized by other institutions for 
similar functions." 

— Section on the Pin sic \i Pi w i 



"Maryland has participated actively with 15 other 
southern states in the programs of the Southern Regional 
Education Board . . . working together to promote greater 
effectiveness in programs of higher education, and to im- 
prove the economy of the region." 

— Section on General Emm NS1 S 



muary-February, J 964 




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I. Instruction 



THE DAY-TIME INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM AT COLLEGE 
Park increased ten percent in 1962-1963 over the 
preceding year. Measured over a five-year span the 
growth amounted to 56 percent. The largest absolute 
increases occurred in the College of Arts and Sciences and 
in the College of Education. 

Specifically, the enrollment of full-time, part-time, 
undergraduate and graduate students at College Park and 
Baltimore numbered 20,088. Undergraduates at College 
Park constituted 14,736 and the Baltimore schools en- 
rolled 1,515 as full-time students. There were 5,723 grad- 
uate students at all centers. The overseas, self-supporting 
program reported 40,069 enrollees. The 1963 summer 
session accommodated 5,881. Viewed in terms of the 
total higher education effort in the State, the University of 
Maryland registered during the regular academic year 39 
percent of all full-time undergraduates enrolled throughout 
the State in two-year colleges, four-year colleges, and 
universities, private and public, exclusive of the United 
States Naval Academy. At the graduate level, the Uni- 
versity accounted for 57 percent of the enrollments in the 
State. 

The post-war population explosion becomes a college 
entrance reality in the fall of 1964, followed by an even 
greater increase in 1965. The challenge now upon us is 
how to use the highest level teaching talent in an optimal 
manner. Our effort has been to maintain relatively small 
classes (30-33 students) in areas such as beginning 
English, in laboratories, and in discussion groups. Senior 
faculty members cover the basic instruction in large lecture 
sections of beginning history, chemistry, botany and the 
like and then supervise the less experienced junior instruc- 
tors who are responsible for discussion sections and labor- 
atories. Freshman and sophomore students at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland do come under the tutelage of our 
most capable senior faculty members. Students who are 
sufficiently mature to accept learning as a personal respon- 
sibility prosper in a setting of this nature. 

Our School of Social Work deserves special mention. 
The first class entered this two-year program in September, 
1961, and the first degrees were granted in June, 1963. 
The School was accredited by its national accrediting 
society, the Council on Social Work Education, on May 
28, 1963. Hence the initial graduates had the advantage 
of being graduated from an accredited institution. Even 
though it is the newest School to be associated with the 
University, it has had a very favorable influence on the 
welfare agencies of the State and it has obtained significant 
training grants in the areas of psychiatric social work and 
neighborhood social work. 

Much time, effort and persuasion are devoted to retain- 
ing key faculty members and in recruiting new persons of 
great promise. We must strive to improve our competitive 
position. Otherwise the qualitative gains which have been 
made can be greatly diminished in a very brief period. 
We are making every effort to refine the instructional pro- 
gram and to retain our key faculty members. 

the Maryland Magazine 



II. Research 



IN THE CURRENT NATIONAL ATMOSPHERE OF CONSTANT 
change, there is as much of a knowledge explosion as 
there is a population explosion. The demand for new 
knowledge and new facts has placed requirements on uni- 
versities to a greater degree than any requirements experi- 
enced in former eras. Ours is an age typified by constant 
innovation and new invention. Change must occur in 
order that we may progress; and without progress our 
survival may be at stake. 

More scientific information has been acquired in the 
past twenty years than in all previous history, yet doctor- 
ates still cannot be mass-produced. A decade is required 
to double the output. The University of Maryland in- 
creased its production from 46 in 1951 to 110 in 1963, 
representing more than two dozen areas of study in agri- 
culture, engineering, natural resources, the physical sci- 
ences, the biological sciences, the social sciences, the 
humanities, and the fine arts. 

As student enrollments have expanded, research has 
kept pace, increasing with equal rapidity to the increases 
in the instructional programs. Over 60 percent of the 
University's organized research of an estimated $ 1 1 mil- 
lion in 1962-63 was supported by U. S. Government 
agencies. Of 464 University research programs under 
Federal grants and contracts, 282 were conducted at 
College Park and 182 at Baltimore. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station has made sig- 
nificantly important contributions during the past year to 
the economy of the State and the nation. Two examples 
may be cited. First, two new varieties of tobacco have 
proved to be completely disease-resistant in black shank 
infested soils. Even more important, the two varieties 
have competed well in quality with other Maryland 
tobacco varieties and have been accepted by buyers at 
high average prices. Secondly, through a newly-developed 
insecticide, it is now possible to control completely the 
looper insect which has been widely troublesome to certain 
vegetable crops. More important, the spray has proved 
capable of controlling the insect without introducing 
chemical residues to the crops. 

The use of computer systems has established a nation- 
wide trend in research which is proving to be revolution- 
ary. In 1962, the University's Computer Science Center 
was established in its new and permanent building on the 
College Park campus. It possesses the triple function of 
providing computing service and programming assistance 
to all academic activities, administering an educational 
program for the various sciences, and conducting research 
programs in computer and computer related sciences. 

Many instances could be listed of both honors and 
recognition which have come to the University and to its 
scholars. The following represent bui a few: 

The Maryland Academy of Sciences award for the 
"Outstanding Young Scientist of 1963." 

• The Washington Academy of Sciences award for 
the "Outstanding Mathematical Scientist of 1963." 

• The William A. Dunning Prize in American 
History for the best book published in 1962. 

• The Mead Corporation Painting-of-the-Year 
Prize. 

• The Poultry Science Research Award for the 
outstanding publication by a junior scientist ap- 
pearing in Poultry Science in 1962. 

• The Washington Academy of Sciences Award for 
the "Outstanding Physical Scientist of 1963." 

January-February, 1964 






III. Extension Education 






FARM PROBLEMS AFFECT NON-FARM RESIDENTS AND 
urban problems affect farm operators. Interdepend- 
ence of the two groups is becoming increasingly important 
to the total economy. Consumer demands for new and 
improved agricultural products have led to sweeping modi- 
fications in the "business of agriculture." Services in food 
preparation, formerly accomplished in the home kitchen, 
are now to a large extent being performed by the market- 
ing services. Efficiency has become a key to survival in 
a competitive economy. 

During the past two years, Extension workers have co- 
operated closely with food processors in establishing 
methods which improve the quality of products. 

Plant pests — diseases and insects — were controlled by 
safe methods demonstrated by Extension workers after 
extensive research had disclosed the proper methods. 
Close working relations between county Extension Agentsj 
and producers resulted in better control of pests andjl 
higher quality food for consumers. 

The Extension 4-H and Youth program have been] 
expanded to include programs and activities of merit fori 
youth in urban areas. No longer is it essential that a 
member have at his disposal a farm where he or she can 
pursue a production-oriented project. Girls learn more of 
home management, clothing design and the basics of 
family living. Leadership of the kind necessary in today's 
society is developed through special educational courses, 
projects and training meetings. Purposeful camping op- 
portunities were made available to all 4-H members in 
every county for the first time in 1963. 

Homemakers are provided with up-to-date information 
pertaining to human nutrition, home management, cloth- 
ing, furnishings, family life and community improvement. 
Today's problems of the rural homemaker are similar to 
those of the urban dweller. 

An active part of Extension Education is that of Fire 
Service Extension headquartered at College Park. This 
association aids in the organization of training courses for 
volunteer fire departments throughout the State. The State 
may be justly proud of the national reputation which has 
come to the volunteer fire work in Maryland. This may 
be seen by the 13 percent reduction in fire insurance rates 
during the past five years, in addition to a premium rate 
reduction of 20 percent last year for homeowner policies 
in Maryland. These decreases for Maryland residents 
occurred at the same time that an overall-average increase 
has been applied to fire insurance premiums for other 
states. 



IV. Student Services 

A University education takes place both in and 
out of class. The student services program at the 
University tries to complement the classroom to make the 
University setting a total climate for learning. Students 
develop new understandings and appreciations through 
the opportunities for cultural pursuits and avocations made 
available to them. The objective of this program is two- 
fold: 

The key objective of this program is to maintain the 
intimacy of inter-personal relationships which characterize 
a smaller college, and yet capitalize upon the resources 
that are those of a great State University. An illustration 
of the dilemma these two goals pose may be found in the 



the Maryland Magazine 



orientation for entering Freshmen. In this program, stu- 
dents are introduced to the academic community during 
the summer prior to registration, in groups of 20 to 25. 
All evidence indicates that this approach instead of the 
mass assembly provides the student with a closer identi- 
fication with the purposes and goals of the University. 
This year 3,000 students participated in this two-day pro- 
gram. Two thousand participated a year ago. 

It is sometimes difficult to think of a University as a 
complex and highly concentrated city. Yet 7,200 students 
reside on campus and in the community. Few enterprises 
can report a growth equivalent to our 56 percent increase 
during the past five-year period. Yet this is the case for 
our residential population. 

V. Libraries 

THE UNIVERSITY'S ROLE IN EDUCATION AND RESEARCH 
continues to expand; the Library not only must keep 
pace with this expansion but must also anticipate it. 

Demands for library service continue to increase. The 
loan service during 1962-63 was over 15 percent greater 
than during 1961-62; the number of reference questions 
increased, during the same period, by nearly 20 percent; 
and attendance in the McKeldin Library reading rooms 
increased by nearly 40 percent. Such increases in activity 
reflect changes not only in enrollment but also in patterns 
of teaching, study, and research. To meet the growing 
needs of students and faculty, the Library's collections 
continue to expand at a rapid rate; this expansion must 
continue, with the Library purchasing not only the new 
books which reflect the latest findings of scholars, but also 
the older books of continuing value not now in stock. 

Although the University experienced an increase of 
2,260 students enrolled on the College Park campus in 
the fall of 1963, greater increases may be anticipated in 
the years ahead. The constant increase in enrollment 
places demands on library service equally as great as the 
demands in the instructional programs. The expansion of 
the Library's collections in the last few years has pro- 
ceeded at a faster pace than at any time in the history 
of the University and it is significant to note that this 
growth has been able to keep pace with increased 
enrollments. 

VI. Public Services 

THERE ARE MANY PUBLIC SERVICES PERFORMED BY 
the University of Maryland and the State Board of 
Agriculture. 

Animal Disease Control and Eradication is of economic 
importance to producers and is also related to public 
\ health. Diagnostic laboratories are operated at Salisbury, 
I Denton, Centreville, Bel Air, College Park, Frederick, 
I Hagerstown and Oakland by staff members of the Live- 
stock Sanitary Service. 

A survey and inspection of all sheep flocks in the State 
\ was carried out, with the cooperation of County Extension 
j personnel, practicing veterinarians and regulatory officials 
I to determine the presence of sheep scabies. Only a few 
cases were found. After their proper treatment, Maryland 
jwas declared a scab-free State by the Secretary of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Twenty Maryland egg producers have been approved to 
market top quality eggs produced in the State as Maryland 
j Fresh Eggs, as provided for in the Maryland Fresh Eggs 
Law. 

January-February, 1964 





A total of 414 communities in 15 counties participatec. 
in the Mosquito Control Program. This was an increase o 
54 communities over the previous year. In temporary 
work more than 639,400 gallons of spray and larvicidin^; 
mixtures were used. In permanent mosquito control work, 
733,469 linear feet (more than 138 miles) of ditch were 
cleaned or dug. 

VII. Auxiliary Enterprises 

IN ADDITION TO THE TWELVE PROGRAMS AT THE 
university which are provided for in the regular Legisla- 
tive Budget, there are a number of educational services 
which operate under Dedicated Funds. 

The following activities are typical of the components 
of this program. 

Laboratory Maintenance Funds. 

Dairy Manufacturing Laroratory. 

University College. 

Wind Tunnel. 

Summer School. 

State Inspection Service. 

Self-Liquidating Construction Program. 

Residence and Dining Halls. 

The University continues to increase the scope and use 
of Dedicated Funds. During the past four years alone, 
total dollar value of Dedicated Fund programs has in- 
creased more than 80 percent. 



VIII. General Expenses 

IN ORDER TO PROMOTE A GREATER OVERALL ECONOMY 
in educational endeavor and to prevent expensive 
duplication of professional facilities, the State of Mary- 
land has participated actively with 15 other southern 
states in the programs of the Southern Regional Educa- 
tion Board. Through the SREB, member states work 
together to promote greater effectiveness in programs of 
higher education, and to improve the economy of the 
region. 

General expenses also cover other costs which do not 
relate to any specific division of the University. Included 
in this category are endowment and development, informa- 
tion services, and the publication of catalogs announcing 
academic programs. 



IX. University Hospital 

THE HOSPITAL HAS INCREASED ITS SERVICES STEADILY 
over the past ten years. Its growth is related to a 
better utilization of facilities and better management of 
resources and personnel rather than an increase in total 
space available. Recently, new programs have been added 
in educational activities associated with a Cardio-Vascular 
Laboratory, a Child Inpatient Service in Psychiatry, a 
Clinical Study Center, a Shock-Trauma Unit, and an Adult 
Rehabilitation Unit. 

There has been an ever increasing load of students 
utilizing facilities in the University Hospital. During the 
past year there was a 28 percent increase in the entering 
class in Medicine. Constant increases are being reflected 
in Nursing programs. The five-year Pharmacy program 
now in effect also makes increased demands for Hospital 
services. 

the Maryland Magazine 



X. Administration 



BASED ON DATA DEVELOPED FOR 1962 BY THE OFFK I 
of Education, U. S. Department of Health, Education 
and Welfare, the University of Maryland is listed as the 
twelfth largest university system in the nation. It is signi- 
ficant to note that in 1956, the University ranked twenty- 
first nationwide. While institutions of higher education are 
increasing in size throughout the nation, the above figures 
provide evidence that the University of Maryland has grown 
at a more rapid rate than others. It is also interesting to 
note that the large majority of those institutions listed in the 
top eleven have multiple branches or centers of the parent 
institution. 

While experiencing an increase of 56 percent in enroll- 
ment during the past five years, the increase in authorized 
positions for Administration has been less than 19 per- 
cent. 

In the area of facilities, the first stage of the Student 
Union addition has been completed. A new dining hall 
and women's residence unit was occupied this fall. 
Through the expanded Student Union, commuting stu- 
dents are being served better than ever before. One room 
which has been designated as a foreign language center 
has drawn national interest. In this lounge are periodicals 
in a variety of foreign tongues. Only languages other than 
English may be spoken in the room. 



XL Physical Plant 



THE COMBINED DEPARTMENTS OF PHYSICAL PLANT AT 
College Park and Baltimore represent the largest re- 
quirement for facility maintenance of any State-supported 
installation in Maryland. 

The Physical Plant is responsible for the maintenance of 
more than four million gross square feet of building space 
in College Park and an additional 799,000 square feet at 
Baltimore. These represent total investments of $134,- 
300,000 at current replacement costs: $103,000,000 at 
College Park, and $31,300,000 in Baltimore. 



XII. Maryland State College 

MARYLAND STATE COLLEGE , A DIVISION OF THE 
University located at Princess Anne in Somerset 
County, has for many years sponsored a comprehensive 
program of higher education intended to serve especially 
the youth of the Eastern Shore area, as well as students 
located in other geographic regions of the State. 

Known throughout the Maryland community as "The 
People's College," this institution, in the true spirit of the 
Land-Grant College Act and subsequent acts, offers cur- 
ricula in agriculture, mechanic arts, arts and sciences, home 
economics, and Air Force Reserve Officers Training. In 
addition to these basic curricula, the following cultural 
events are sponsored: music, radio and television pro- 
grams; art exhibits and special speakers who come from 
all corners of the United States and from abroad. 

During the year 1962-63 a new dormitory for 106 
women was occupied, giving housing relief to a badly 
overcrowded situation and providing for additional resi- 
dent students. 

The September 1962 enrollment was 519 full-time 
students. 




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January-February, 1964 




: 

InsidC Maryland SpOrtS by Bill Dismer, Director of Sports Information 



BECAUSl 01 1 IMI I H> si \l|N(i < U'ACITY. FEWER SPECTATORS 
watch Maryland's winningest indoor sports team in 
action, but all Maryland followers know that personable 
Coach Bill Campbell has another winner in his current swim- 
ming team. As these lines were written the tri-champions of 
the Atlantic Coast Conference last year were undefeated and 
could move into the ACC meet at Chapel Hill the last three 
days of this month with a clean record. Ron Squiers, Mary- 
land's all-America diver last year, is co-captain of the squad 
with Doc Dunphy. Ten other lettermen are on the squad. 
Campbell can hardly wait for freshman Phil Denkevitz, 
whom he's tabbed "the fastest thing in water", to become 
eligible for varsity competition. 

Coach Sully Krouse's wrestling team was 2-1-1 after its 
first four matches and Navy, North Carolina and Duke re- 
main to be faced before the Conference tournament. That 
tourney, incidentally, will be held right here in Cole Field 
House on March 6-7. As February began, Krouse's matmen 
had a string of 57 successive conference victories under their 
belts. 

As expected, Coach Bud Millikan's basketball team was 
losing a few games here and there, but it was within a game 
of the .500 mark when exams hit and could surprise any 
opponent inclined to take its sophomore-dominated team 
lightly. The Terp quint swept it's first three ACC games 
with Virginia, N.C. State and Clemson only to drop its fourth 
to South Carolina in a pulsating, overtime game. Had leading 
scorer Gary Ward been able to play, Maryland might have 
won the Evansville (Ind.) Christmas Holiday tournament as 
it lost to Arizona, the eventual champion, by only a 57-54 
score in the opening game. The following night Arizona 
walloped the odds-on favored host Evansville team by 17 
points. 

Millikan's sophs were justifying his faith in them by hold- 
ing the first six positions in the team's scoring column. Ward, 
the 6-5 forward from nearby DeMatha, was the only one in 
double figures with a 15.7 average, but Rick Wise of Wil- 
mington, Del., George Suder of Aliquippa, Pa., Jackie Clark 
and Neil Brayton from Beverly and Youngstown, Ohio, and 
Mike DeCosmo from Camden, N.J. were closely-bunched. 
All had scored over 100 points after the first 15 games. 

Just as encouraging to the overall basketball picture has 
been the development of the freshman team under Coach 
Frank Fellows which ran through its first eight games without 
a loss. Jay McMillen, a 6-7, 215-pounder from Mansfield, 
Pa., was pacing the scorers with a 23.1 average with Joe 
Harrington, 6-5 of Phippsburg, Maine, close behind with 
19.2. Others who should be of help to the varsity next year 
are Paul Hauser, Dan Brotman and Gary Williams, all of 
whom were averaging in double figures. 

Incidentally, Kansas — reestablishing its role as a Midwest 
court power, is on Maryland's home basketball schedule next 
season. 



A look ahead . . . 

Hard to believe, but spring sports will be getting under 
way in just about a month's time. Coach Doyle Royal's tennis 
team will be the first to see competition with two matches at 
Clemson and South Carolina starting the schedule March 
20-21. 

Lacrosse, a sport in which Maryland has to bow to none, 
will be under the head coaching of another of Maryland's 
greatest stars of yesteryear, Al Heagy, when it opens its 14- 
gamc schedule March 24. Games with Navy and the Mary- 
land Lacrosse Club feature a 10-gamc home card with the 
stickmen slated to visit I'enn State. Army, Virginia and Johns 
Hopkins, lack Laber, who coached the sport for 36 years, 
now is Chairman of Maryland's Athletic Council. Heagy 
shared the coaching duties with Dr. Faber for 33 years before 
assuming sole responsibility this spring. 




Coach Jack Jackson's baseball team, like the tennisers. 
will open its schedule on the road, playing two games at 
South Carolina March 27 and 28 before moving over to 
Clemson for games on the 30th and 31st. Ten games are 
scheduled for Shipley Field including games with the five 
other ACC rivals, George Washington, Georgetown, Syracuse, 
West Virginia and Yale. 



The golf team, under Coach Frank Gronin, also the major 
domo of our fine course across University Boulevard, doesn't 
start until March 30 when it meets Dartmouth here. Five 
of the 12 matches are scheduled for Maryland's home course. 
The season concludes with the ACC tournament at Columbia. 
S.C. 



Coach Jim Kehoe's track team will start the outdoor sea- 
son in the South Carolina Relays on April 4. Duke, North 
Carolina and Navy will be met in dual meets while the thin- 
clads also will take part in the Penn Relays at Philadelphia. 
Kehoe & Co. also will play host to the ACC meet here in 
Byrd Stadium May 7-8. 



As this column was being written, the world champion 
Boston Celtics were due at the Cole Field House, February 
6 for a NBA league game with the Baltimore Bullets. The 
contest was under the sponsorship of the M Club. On 
February 8, the M Club was to meet to elect their new 
officers, sit down to a buffet supper and then watch the 
Maryland-Duke game in the Field House. 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF ACTIVITIES 



FEBRUARY 

10 Spring Semester Begins 

10 Swimming, Wake Forest, Away 

1 1 Swimming, Duke, Away 

13 Track, N.Y. Athletic Club, Away 

14 Basketball, Wake Forest, Home 

15 Wrestling, Navy, Away 
15 Track, Navy, Away 

15 Swimming, Washington & Lee, 

Home 
18 Basketball, North Carolina, Home 

21 Swimming, North Carolina, Home 

22 Track, National A.A.U., New 

York 
22 Wrestling, North Carolina, Home 



22 Basketball, Duke, Away 
25-March l'The Beaux' Strategem," 

University Theater 
25 Basketball, Georgetown, Home 

27 Track, N.Y.K.C, New York 
27, 28, 29 Swimming, A.C.C., Chapel 

Hill, N. C. 

28 Basketball, Clemson, Away 

29 Wrestling, Duke, Home 

29 Track, All-Eastern Games, Balti- 
more 

MARCH 

5-7 Basketball, A.C.C. Tournaments, 
Raleigh, N.C. 



6-7 Wrestling, N.C*. A. A. lourna- 
ments, Ithaca. N.Y. 

7 Track, I.C.4A., New York 

18-21 An Evening of Modem 
Dance, University Theater 

21 Easter Recess Begins 

3 1 Easter Recess Ends 
APRIL 

21-26 "Picnic. "' University Theater 
MAY 

13 AFROTC Day 
28 Pre-Examination Study Daj 
29-June 5 Spring Semester Examina- 
tions 

3 1 Baccalaureate 



New Major Appointments 

A Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences, Head of the Department of 
Botany, and Director of Alumni Rela- 
tions are among recent major appoint- 
ments made to the faculty and staff of 
the University. 

Dr. Charles F. Manning, a member 
of the University faculty since 1946 
and Acting Dean of the College of 
Arts and Sciences since 1962, succeeds 
Dr. Leon Smith who has retired. 

Dr. Robert W. Krauss, Professor of 
Plant Physiology in the College of Agri- 
culture and an authority on algal cul- 
ture, has been named Head of the 
Department of Botany. He succeeds 
Dr. Ronald M. Bamford, Dean of the 
Graduate School. 

John L. Schutz, a graduate of the 
College of Agriculture, is the new 
Director of Alumni Relations. He suc- 
ceeds David L. Brigham who resigned 
in June, 1963. 

Other major appointments include: 
Dr. Donald M. McCorkle, Director, 



Editor-in-chief of the Morvian Music 
Foundation and well-known author, as 
Professor of Music; Dr. Charles E. 
Barr, of the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia School of Denistry, as Coordi- 
nator for the Clinical Services and 
Associate Professor of Oral Medicine at 
the School of Denistry; and Dr. Ted S. 
Y. Koo, University of Washington Re- 
search Associate Professor, as Research 
Professor of Fisheries of the Mary- 
land Natural Resources Institute. 

At the same time, Dr. Raymond 
Morgan, former Head of the Depart- 
ment of Physics, was named Professor 
Emeritus of Physics. Dr. Morgan, 
who joined the staff of the University 
in 1942, retired last year. In addition 
to supervising a research program in 
gaseous electronics at the time of his 
retirement, he had long been teaching 
the basic course in physics. 

Dean Manning, a graduate of Tufts 
College, Harvard University and the 
University of North Carolina, came to 
the University in 1946 as an Assistant 
Professor of English. Previously a 
faculty member of Colby College and 



Centre College of Kentucky, he was 
promoted to Associate Professor and 
Assistant Dean in 1950. and Associate 
Dean in 1959. He served as Depart- 
mental Chairman of freshman English 
from 1947 until 1949. 

Dr. Krauss. who holds degrees from 
Oberlin College. University of Hawaii 
and the University of Maryland, was 
awarded the biology achievement award 
by the Washington Academy of Sci- 
ences in 1961. A consultant to the 
U. S. Air Force School of Aviation 
Medicine, he is the author of numerous 
articles in the field of plant physiology. 

Schutz. an alumnus of the College ol 
Agriculture, is a colonel in the U. S. 
Army currently assigned to the National 
Security Agency. The holder o( num- 
erous meritorious awards, including the 
Legion of Merit, he entered the service 
in 1940. While a student at College 
Park, he was a member of the varsit) 
track team, president of Omicron Delta 
Kappa, honorary fraternity, and Sigma 
Nu. social fraternity and manager ol 
the basketball team. He will assume 
his new duties on Jul\ I. 



January-February, 1964 



1 1 



Alumnus Edits New Book 

W. A. Douglas Jackson. Ph.D., BPA, 
Professor of Geography and As- 
sistant Director ol the Far Eastern and 
Russian Institute at the University of 

Washington. Seattle, is the Editor of a 
book of readings which comprise a new 
book in the field ol contemporary 
geographical thinking. 

1 ntitled Politics and Geographic Re- 
lationships, and published in June. 
1963, b\ Prentice-Hall Inc.. the book 
presents structural concepts underlying 
the phenomena and the motivations 
\>hich dictate man's organization of 
both himself and the surface of the 
earth. 

The focus of the book is the political- 
territorial unit, or the state. The read- 
ings present discussions of the nature 
of the state and its characteristics and 
functions, with particular emphasis on 
the makings of a people or the creation 
of a nation, followed by examinations 
of the problems of boundaries and 
frontiers, core areas and capital cities, 
doctrines of government and bases of 
economics and technology. A large 
section of the book deals with an ex- 
amination of problems confronting un- 
derdeveloped states and newly emerg- 
ing nations, and it closes with a detailed 
investigation of power and strategy on 
the international scene. 

Among the contributing authors are 
George Santayana, Gunnar Myrdal and 
Karl W. Deutsch. 



Physics, Astronomy Units 
are Under Construction 

Construction has been started on 
three new buildings here to meet the 
needs of the University of Maryland 
Department of Physics and Astronomy. 

The largest is a $1.6 million addition 
to tne present physics building which 
will include underground provisions for 
the first stage of a cyclotron installation. 
The new addition will consist of class- 
rooms, instructional laboratories, re- 
search laboratories, faculty offices, mis- 
cellaneous facilities and a machine shop. 

Two smaller laboratory installations 
are being built at a cost of about 
$55,000 and will be located on the 
western side of the campus. These will 
include a small astronomical observa- 
tory and a facility for experimental 
studies of general relativity. 

Opportunities for Alumni 
in the Peace Corps 

The Peace Corps estimates that it 
will require al least 9.000 Volunteers 
to meet the requests of host country 
governments in 1964. 

These needs include: 5.000 teachers, 
2,000 community development workers. 



700 health workers, 600 agricultural 
technicians and 700 skilled tradesmen, 
technicians and professional personnel. 

The greatest demand is for teachers — 
3.000 for secondary schools, 1,000 for 
elementary and 500 for colleges and 
universities. An additional 500 Volun- 
teers are needed for the fields of physi- 
cal, vocational and adult education. 

In the field of health, 500 nurses of 
all kinds are needed. Another 200 per- 
sons will fill posts as medical, laboratory 
and X-ray technicians, doctors, dentists, 
sanitarians, etc. 

Applicants are advised to submit an 
early application if they want to be con- 
sidered for either a February or June 
appointment. An application form may 
be secured from the Peace Corps, Divi- 
sion of Recruiting, Washington, D. C. 
20525. Special literature will be sent to 
those indicating the particular area of 
their skill and when they would prob- 
ably be available. 



Alumni 



Spring 



Reunion 



May 16 
2 p.m. 



College 



Park 



Some Recent Grants 
to the University 

For support of research at the 
Clark Lake Radio Observatory. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND 
ASTRONOMY 

$72,800. 

For construction of a center in Bal- 
timore for the study of shock and 
trauma. 

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH 
TO THE UNIVERSITY 

$800,000. 

* 

For support of an in-service insti- 
tute in physics for secondary school 
teachers of science. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND AS- 
TRONOMY 

$17,520. 

For research on singular partial dif- 
ferential equations and eigenvalue 
problems. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
INSTITUTE OF FLUID DYNAMICS AND 
APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

$1,750. 

For research on atmospheric pa- 
rameters of cepheid variables. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND AS- 
TRONOMY 

$7,500. 

For research on dynamics of astro- 
physical plasmas. 

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE 
ADMINISTRATION TO INSTITUTE FOR 
FLUID DYNAMICS AND APPLIED 
MATHEMATICS 

$97,622. 

* 

For support of an undergraduate 
instructional scientific equipment 
program. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

$17,500. 

For a conference on space com- 
munications. 

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE 
ADMINISTRATION TO UNIVERSITY 
COLLEGE 

$6,036. 

For study of phycophysiology in 
controlled environments. 

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE 
ADMINISTRATION TO DEPARTMENT 
OF BOTANY 

$99,250. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 




Law Alumni are Admitted to Practice before the Supreme Court 



Twenty-eight graduates of the School of Law, Class of 1960, 
were admitted to practice before the United States Supreme 
Court on January 20. The lawyers, all members of the Mary- 
land Bar, were welcomed by Chief Justice Warren. 

The Chief Justice said it is not often that so many graduates 
of one law school are admitted to practice before the high 
court in a single day. "On behalf of the Court," he said, "I 
want to welcome you to the bar of this Court." 

The lawyers were presented for admission by the Maryland 
Attorney General Thomas B. Finan. Also sworn in at the 
same time were Eugene A. Edgett, Jr., Class of 1951, and 
Michael Paul Yuhasz, a graduate of the University of Balti- 
more. 

Seated, left to right: Mrs. Barbara Day Nail, New 
York; Maryland Attorney General Thomas B. Finan; Forrest 
Johnston Prettyman, Rockville. 



Standing, left to right: Brian Randolph Williford, 
Hyattsville; A. Douglas Owens, Baltimore; David B. Rudow, 
Baltimore; Julian R. Manelli, Baltimore; Robert Franklyn 
Collins, Baltimore; William M. l.enck. Oxon Mill; Vincent J. 
Leahy, Jr.. Baltimore; George Louis Muber. Jr.. Baltimore; 
Stanley Simon Cohen. Baltimore; Thomas E. Kelly, Jr.. Balti- 
more; Michael Paul Yuhasz. Baltimore; Eugene Philip Kr.ieh. 
Baltimore; Charlie E. Hagwood, Baltimore: Harr\ Edward 
Silverwood, Jr., Baltimore: Andrew Joseph Burns, Balti- 
more; Julian B. Stevens, Jr., Annapolis: Benjamin H. Mur- 
ray, Baltimore; James Franklin Garrity. Baltimore: Alva 
Palmer Weaver, III, Baltimore; Richard C. Whiteford. Balti- 
more; William Ashby Agee, Baltimore: James Arthur Cole, 
Baltimore; Edward L. Blanton. Jr.. Baltimore: Benjamin 
Notes Dorman, Baltimore: and Howard J. Needle. Baltimore. 

Not pictured: Eugene A. Edgett. Jr.. Eugene M. 
Schreiber and James B. Stradtner, all of Baltimore. 



FOR SUMMER AND FALL, 1964 



MARYLAND ADVERTISERS 



Please Contact 

ROBERTSON LEACH 

Advertising Director 

826 West 40th Street 

Baltimore, Maryland 21211 

Telephone: BElmont 5-8302 



January-February, 1964 



13 



Lorraine Davis, Sophomore Qn\ 



Maryland Girls 



WHILE WE DO NOT WISH TO DENY THAT GIRLS OF 
singular beauty cannot be found on other campuses, 
we do affirm in truth that the fairness of Maryland girls 
is something different — something special. This much is 
evident to a casual visitor. 

Maryland girls have been well represented in the Miss 
America Pageant in Atlantic City. Five co-eds have ap- 
peared in competition in the past ten years, one of which 
was a first runner-up. A number of national magazines 
have selected Maryland girls as campus models. Several 
girls have been elected as queens of various associations. 

While no academic type has yet found a correlation be- 
tween beauty and scholastic achievement, the elusive 
quality is no less prized on the college campus. 

Beauty is its own excuse for being. 
— Emerson. 

And that's exactly how we feel. 




Anita Husen, Pledge Queen. 







* - V 



Alessia Passai.acqua, Military Hall Queen. 






\ 





Stephanie French, Freshman Queen. 




Sue Hammond, Greek Week Queen. 



Georgia Mayer, Miss Maryland. 
January-February, 1964 



15 




University Appoints New Alumni Director 



J Logan Schutz, B.S. 1938, M. S. 1940, Agricul- 
. culture, has been named Director of Alumni Relations, 
effective July 1. He is currently serving with the National 
Security Agency at Fort Meade. Col. Schutz will volun- 
tarily retire from the U.S. Army on June 30, 1964. 

At Maryland, Col. Schutz was President of Omicron 
Delta Kappa, honorary fraternity; President of Sigma Nu, 
social fraternity; and a member of Alpha Zeta, agriculture 
honorary. He ran the high and low hurdles and was a 
letterman in track. He was also a member of Scabbard 
and Blade, the Interfraternity Council and the Student 
Government Association. 

Twenty-four years after leaving the University as a 
graduate student, Logan Schutz returns to the campus with 
a young family and a distinguished career in the service 
of his country. Although his wife, Louise Matthews, 
attended the University, Logan first met her at Fort 
Leavenworth, Kansas. They have two boys, Logan (who 
is a Life Scout), 14, and Fred, 1 1, and a girl, Marian, 6. 

Col. Schutz is a graduate of the Army, Navy Staff 
College, Infantry School, the Command and General Staff 
College, the Armed Forces Staff College, and the Army 
War College. 

In 1940, he was commissioned under the Thomason 
Act and completed company officer duties with the 12th 
Infantry in Arlington, Virginia, and the 34th Infantry 
in Fort Jackson, South Carolina. In November, 1941, 
he became Aide de Camp to General J. D. Patch, who 
served as Professor of Military Science and Tactics at the 
University during the period 1936-1938. 

During World War II, Col. Schutz served as assistant 
to the Plans and Operations officer of the 80th Infantry 
Division at Camp Forrest, Tennessee; was U.S. Aide de 
Camp to General Sir Henry M. Wilson, Commander-in- 
Chief of the Mediterranean Theater, headquartered in 
Algiers and later in Italy; and served as Plans Officers, in 
the China Theater. Following the war, he instructed at the 



Command and General Staff College in Fort Leavenworth, 
Kansas, was battalion commander in the 3rd Amored 
Division at Fort Knox, Kentucky, and served with Head- 
quarters Caribbean Command, Quarry Heights, Panama 
Canal Zone. 

From 1952 to 1955, Col. Schutz served in the office 
of the Inspector General at the Pentagon, and in 1955, 
he assumed command of the 3rd Battalion, 85th Infantry, 
Fort Riley, Kansas and moved with that unit to Bamberg, 
Germany. In March, 1957 he was then transferred, as 
Plans Officer, to the Seventh U.S. Army Headquarters 
in Stuttgart, Germany. 

In 1957, Col. Schutz helped organize the Overseas 
Chapter in Germany of the University of Maryland 
Alumni Association, and served as its first vice president. 

Col. Schutz was assigned to Korea in 1959 with the 
1st Cavalry Division, as commander of the 1st Battle 
Group, 8th Calvalry of the 1st Cavalry Division. In this 
capacity, his responsibilities included providing early warn- 
ing of any Communist attack on American and South 
Korean forces, securing his area against line crossers, par- 
ticularly enemy agents, improving battle positions near the 
DMZ, and providing for the defense of a vital sector of 
the Korea front line. 

Assigned as Chief of Staff of the XXth U.S. Army 
Corps, Ft. Hayes, Ohio, in 1960, Col. Schutz was overseer 
of Army Reserve, ROTC and related active Army activi- 
ties in Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky. 

In July, 1963, Col. Schutz was assigned to the National 
Security Agency at Fort Meade, where, aside from his 
military duties, he also serves as chairman of a Boy Scout 
Troop and is engaged in a variety of post activities. 

The holder of numerous meritorious awards, his 
military decorations include two Legions of Merit for 
distinguished wartime service and the Commendation 
Medal for his command duty in Korea. 



16 



the Maryland Magazine 



LETTER 
FROM 

AN ALUMNUS 



Dear Sir: 

It was a month ago when 1 first 
learned from Dr. C. S. Shaffner, Head 
of the Department of Poultry Science, 
that Prof. F. Bridgers, the Foreign Stu- 
dent Advisor, is on a three-month mis- 
sion with the U.A.R. -U.S.A. Educa- 
tional Exchange Commission in Egypt. 
But it was only last week that I had a 
chance to leave Alexandria and visit 
Prof. Bridgers at his office in Cairo. 

While talking together about the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and our friends 
there, Prof. Bridgers showed me a list 
of the names of some fifty Egyptian 
students who have studied or- are at 
present pursuing study in the different 
fields there. As soon as I finished count- 
ing them, unconsciously I exclaimed: 
"But there were only three of us at 
first . . ." 

This short remark suddenly took me 
back to the middle forties when the first 
three Egyptian students, H. H. Hassan, 
S. Tewfick and I came to College Park 
to take graduate studies in horticulture 
and poultry. The human memory is an 
amazing "apparatus", it can unroll in 
seconds a story which needs hours if 
shown on a movie projector; and here 
is an account of the film-roll which sped 
through my memory as I remembered 
the first few months of my five-year 
stay in America. 

Whether inside or outside the cam- 
pus, there were many new and exciting 
things for us. Eating ice-cream at the 
Prince George restaurant while we 
watched snow falling outside; the de- 
tached and arm-rest chairs of the lec- 
ture rooms; self-service in cafeterias and 
grocery stores; the false-and-true, or the 
multiple-choice quizzes; the hitch-hiking 
to and from Washington; and several 
other things. But for people who never 
in their life walked on snow, this was 
probably the most wonderful of all 
events, one which reminds me of the 
following incident. 

It happened 48 hours after our arrival 
in the States. This was registration day 
for Spring, 1946. After meeting Dr. 
Appleman, the former Dean of the 
Graduate School, and completing, our 
registration, we were told to go and see 
the Dean of Men for our living accom- 
modations. When we asked where his 
office was, somebody who apparently 
had trouble with our very decided Medi- 
terranean accent, wrongly pointed to 
one of the women residence halls. 



Amidst the giggling of a lew young 
girls there, a dignified elderly lady tried 
to soothe our embarrassment and said: 
"Well boys, it happens that 1 am the 
Dean of Women. I think there was a 
slight mistake." But we could not get 
over it until we closed the door on leav- 
ing, and as soon as we stood outside, 
we burst into laughter, and kept laugh- 
ing while going down the icy stairs in 
front of the building. Suddenly one of 
us slipped, and trying to save himself. 
by holding on to one of us, caused all 
three of us to slip and tumble down the 
stairs. 

The do-it-yourself system was anoth- 
er experience to which we were not 
accustomed. In order to adjust our- 
selves to this American way of life, we 
needed strong will, and patience. This 
reminds me of a particular incident. 

I had to collect data on the body 
weights of some thousand turkeys for 
my M.S. thesis. Sometimes I had to 
weigh in a single day about two or three 
hundred turkeys which hatched together 
and reached a certain age on that par- 
ticular day. Although I had the kind 
help of Mr. Dahl, who was in charge 
of the turkey flock at that time, the job 
became increasingly tiresome as the tur- 
keys grew and became bigger and 
stronger. One had to wrestle with each 
turkey for awhile in order to put it on 
the scales. Two other factors added 
more difficulty to the job: the rise in 
temperature, as summer was approach- 
ing, and the fasting . . . every faithful 
moslem was obliged to observe from 
dawn to sunset, during the month of 
Ramadan, which came in June that 
year. 

After observing this religious tradition 
for seventeen days, I had to give it up 
as it happened that one of the turkey 
hatches had to be weighed on that par- 
ticular day. When I returned to my 
room in the afternoon, I was completely 
exhausted. I then decided that doing 
my job was more important than to ex- 
perience another 12 days of what the 
poor suffers when he does not find food. 
There were many such stories which 
were based on one cause in common. 
It was not very long before we discov- 
ered it and realized that we were pass- 
ing through an experiment of adjust- 
ment. Therefore we decided to make it 
last as short as possible. We came to 
the conclusion that in order to be able 
to live and study with Americans, we 
had to learn how to talk their language, 
literally and figuratively. Presently we 
worked hard on our accent, food habits, 
greetings, and we even changed our 
home-made suits, shoes and practically 
everything we brought with us. 

It should be added that this adjust- 
ment was not singlehanded. In fact our 
professors and friends contributed to it. 
On many occasions they directed us, 
and their orientation was most helpful. 
Not only that, but there were times 
when we felt that they were also going 



through a course ot adjustment i 

member the vv .i> the late ' >i Jull. 

former Head ol the Poultry 1 1 
ment, used to talk to me. ii 
completer) changed his pronunciation in 

order to make ever) syllable and 

clear, especially the r's. 

At home, Egyptians shake hand 

whenever two friends meet. The) mas 
do this with the same friend several 
times whenever they meet, even on the 
same day. Our American friends started 
to pick up this way ot greeting. While 
we were training ourselves to then 
methods, there were moments ol con 
fusion when sometimes an American 
friend stood with his hand extended 
while we answered, hatuls-in-poekets: 
"Hi". 

Occasionally we conferred together 
on the causes of the problems which 
both sides encountered in meeting and 
knowing each other. We agreed that 
cultural differences were the main cause. 
Isolation, whether complete or partial, 
was the main responsible factor. In- 
deed, this conclusion is not speculation 
It is a fact which stands firmly on sci- 
entific findings. If you mix together 
history, geography and biology, espe- 
cially anthropology, genetics and evolu- 
tion, you will take it for granted that 
racial and cultural differences among 
humans are not much different from the 
phenomenon of speciation in the plant 
and animal kingdoms. 

It is well established that the main 
causes of variations among plants, or 
animals are mutations, and isolation. In 
a similar fashion, they also operate on 
human morphological traits such as skin 
color, cranial dimensions, differences in 
eye color and shape, and other char- 
acters. They also operate on differences 
in culture. Philosophers, prophets, re- 
formers, great scientists, and artists ol 
all kinds, are merely cultural mutations 
whose cultures were operated upon b\ 
different methods of isolation whether in 
time, or in place. However, we notice 
that modern methods of transportation. 
and communication are levelling such 
differences to a certain extent. It seems 
that we are approaching a kind ot world 
culture. In my opinion, the best of all 
means for achieving that is a world-wide 
policy of students' exchange. 

I never forgot what my friend Dr. 
Henry W. Garren said when he came 
with his wife and children to say good- 
bye to us when we left the States. He 
started by asking: "How ^o you folks 
feel on leaving us after these years?", 
and quickly he answered. "o\ course 
America became a second home lor 
you." 

That was the exact truth. 

Dr. Hussein M. El-1biary. 
Ph.D. Agr. '50 

Professor of Poultry Production, 
Faculty of Agriculture, 
Univerity of Alexandria, I A.R. 



January-February, 1964 



17 



below: The Singers as they appeared at their 
farewell performance at the University. They 
wore attire which they will wear on their tour. 
right: President Elkins personally wished each 
member of the student group a successful and 
safe tour as they embarked at Friendship Airport. 
Miss Grentzer's flowers were a gift of the 
President. 





18 



the Maryland Magazine 



University Singers Leave 
for Mideast-European Tour 



AMID THE FLURRY OF HANDSHAKES, WAVES, AND PIC- 
ture-posing, the University of Maryland Singers de- 
parted on February 12 from Friendship Airport to begin 
a four-month tour of 12 countries, under the sponsorship 
of the Cultural Presentations Program of the United 
States Department of State. President Wilson H. Elkins 
was on hand to bid good-bye to the group. 

Directed by Miss Rose Marie Grentzer of the Depart- 
ment of Music, the Singers, composed of 18 University 
men and women, will present 75 concerts and lecture 
demonstrations in Greece, Turkey, Iraq, Iran, Egypt, 
Jordan, Cyprus, Lebanon, Morocco, Tunisia, Great 
Britain and Ireland. The tour will end in London and 
Dublin, Ireland, where the Singers will compete in the 
International Choral Festival in Cork. 

The Singers, who specialize in singing and playing 
Renaissance period music, will also present on this tour 
popular European music of the 16th and 17th centuries 
and contemporary American chamber music. 

While they vocally harmonize in Latin, English, French, 
Spanish and German, the Singers give their music the 
sound of authenticity by accompanying themselves with 
a lute, which somewhat resembles a modern classical 
guitar; a rebec, a forerunner of the violin; a recorder, 
a woodwind instrument; and a harpsichord, used as a solo 
instrument and for accompaniment during Renaissance 
and later periods. 

Colorful costumes in the style of the period, designed 
and constructed by students in the College of Home 
Economics, add a further touch to the performance of 
the Singers. When they sing Elizabethan music, they 
wear costumes adapted from Renaissance models, and 
for presenting modern and period American Choral music, 
which is the special emphasis of this tour, they wear 
modern evening clothes. 

The Singers got their start five years ago, in Miss 
Grentzer's class in choral conducting. It was then that 
the students got a taste of madrigal singing, and wanted 
to continue. In the beginning, they met informally dur- 



ing the noon hour, but later, as special interest intensified, 
the organization of the singers became more formal and 
the reputation and demand for performances by the group 
spread. To date, their engagements in the United States 
have included University and college concerts; community 
concerts; local, network television and radio performances: 
and an impressive round of special invitational appear- 
ances. In 1961, the Singers performed for all chiefs of 
diplomatic missions in Washington. DC. during the 
annual dinner for the chiefs given by U.S. Secretary of 
State and Mrs. Dean Rusk. They also appeared on the 
program for the 399th birthday celebration for William 
Shakespeare at Folger Shapespeare Library in 1963. 

The Singers are being accompanied on this tour b\ 
their assistant director, Stavroula Fanos. instructor in the 
Department of Music, and by Mr. and Mrs. LaVerne 
Baldwin. Mr. Baldwin is the State Department eseort 
for the group, who spent many hours before they left 
impressing upon them the responsibilities of being in- 
formal ambassadors of goodwill. 

Miss Grentzer considers this tour of the Singers the 
highest achievement of the group, and shares the belief, 
with President Elkins, that the Singers ". . . can make 
a substantial contribution ... to the welfare o\' inter- 
national relations." 

The itinerary of the Madrigal tour is as follows; 
February 14-February 29, Greece (Athens. Piraeus. 
Mytilini, Patras. Chania, Heraklion, Thessolonike); 
February 29-March 8. Turkey (Ankara. Izmir, Istanbul); 
March 8-March 1 3. Iraq ( Baghdad ); March I3-Mareh 18, 
Iran (Tehran, Shiraz); March 1 8-March 26, United Arab 
Republic (Cairo); March 26-April 3, Jordan (Jerusa- 
lem); April 3-April 12, Cyprus (Nicosia. Farmagusta. 
Larnaca, Limassol); April 12-April 1 C L Lebanon (Beirut. 
Tripoli); April 20-April 29. Morocco (Rabat. Casa- 
blanca, Marrakech, Tangier); April 30-Mav 6, Tunisia 
(Tunis); May 7-May 13, England (London); May 14- 
May 18, Scotland (Edinburgh); May 18-Maj 24. Ire- 
land (Dublin); May 25, depart for United States. 



January-February, 1964 



19 



Through 

The 

Years 



1895-1919 






■ 









i * mm* 

' I 11 



a h». 






<■. * 



<:««»•«« |£-v5cw-,i: 



John McMullen, m.d. '95, born in 
Florida, reared in Georgia, was a resi- 
dent of Washington, D.C. at the time! 
of his death in April of 1963. He was 
93. He was an eye surgeon and a 
specialist in trachoma, having donej 
much notable work in that field, as al 
doctor in the service of the Public 
Health Service. During his career with I 
the Public Health Service Dr. McMul- 
len also served with the offices of the ' 
Consulate General in London and Hong , 
Kong. 

Charles Franklin Cooper, m.d. 
'97, of Perry, Georgia, died in January 
of 1963 after a brief illness. He prac- 
ticed medicine for about 15 years, and 
then became more interested in farm- 
ing. He was 86 years of age. 

Albert F. Linscott, d.d.s. 1900, of 
Marion, Ohio, is still practicing den- 
tistry. 

Walter R. Mitchell, Engr. '04 of 
Virginia, died recently. 

W.A.S. Somerville, Engr. '08, who 
made his home in Frostburg, Maryland, 
died at his home on December 8, 1963. 

Enos S. Stockbridge, l.l.b. '10, of! 
Baltimore, Maryland, died in the Fall of 
1963. He was prominent in govern- 
mental affairs of Baltimore City and the 
State of Maryland. Not the least among 
the important positions he had held 
was his membership on the Board of 
Regents of the University of Maryland. 

Charles H. Keesor, m.d. '11, of 
2302 Chapline St., Wheeling, W. Va. 
has continuously practiced medicine 
since his graduation from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. He was a member of 
Theta Kappa Psi Medical Fraternity 
while in school. He not only served 
actively in his Medical career, but was 
intensely interested and active in his 
church and the Masonic Order. 

George Cullen Battle, m.d. '12, 
who resided in Columbia, South Caro- 
lina, died on March 28, 1963. 

Joseph Rottenberg, m.d. '12, of 
Detroit, Michigan, passed away on 
March 2. 1963. 

Harry Deibel, m.d. '12, resides in 
Baltimore, Maryland where he con- 
tinues in general practice and minor 
surgery. He previously was state insur- 
ance examiner and health officer of 
Baltimore City. He is a member of 
the American Medical Association, Bal- 
timore City Medical Society and the 
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of the 
University of Maryland. 

the Maryland Magazine 



Albert H. Sellman, Engr. '17, lives 
in Washington, D. C, having retired 
after more than 42 years in government 
service with the Bureau of Naval 
Weapons. 

J. L. ("Jim") Bradley, A&S '16, has 
been retired by Koppers Company, Inc., 
of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and is living 
in Alexandria, Virginia. 

Jessie Singleton Guzman, Nurs. 
'18, died October 4, 1963 in Red 
Springs, North Carolina where she had 
been living. 

Lester R. Martin, Phar. '19 of 
Cumberland, Maryland passed away 
during 1963. He was an honorary 
member of the University of Maryland 
Pharmacy Alumni. 

Arthur R. Remsberg, d.d.s. 19, re- 
sides in Frederick, Maryland. He 
served for six months in 1918 with the 
armed services. He has been active 
with the Frederick Lions Club, and 
several orders of the Masons. 




Dr. A bell 



Dr. Robert Ephraim Abell, of 
Chester, South Carolina, president of 
the class of '12 at the University of 
Maryland Medical School, died on 
March 9, 1963. He is survived by his 
widow, Alice Glenn Abell, by a son 
Dr. Thomas Abell, of Raymond, New 
Hampshire, and a daughter, Mrs. 
Sutherland Brown, of Charlotte, North 
Carolina, as well as by two sisters and 
a brother. Dr. Abell attained promin- 
ence in his profession in his native state 
of South Carolina as President of the 
State Medical Society and as a long- 
term member of the State Board of 
Medical Examiners. During World War 
I, Dr. Abell served in France in the 
Medical Corps of the Army as a Cap- 
tain. After the War he became inter- 
ested in the American Legion and was 
Commander of the Legion Post in 
Chester. He was founder of the Chester 
Sanitorium in 1915 and in 1926 be- 
came surgeon of the Pryor Hospital in 



Chester. His business co mections i i 
eluded a directorship ol I he ( oumiei- 
cial Bank in Chester. Prioi to entering 
the Medical School at the Univei 
of Maryland. Dr. Abell hail attended 
Davidson College where he was a mem- 
ber of Beta I beta Pi. In 1962 Dr. 
Abell and his wife ret irned to Balti 
more to participate in the Reunion ol 
the Class of 1912. 

Martha Maiiov LASSAHN, Nursing 
'13, continues to reside in Baltimore. 
Maryland. 

Richard C. Williams, A&S '14, oi 
Detroit, Michigan, passed awaj in 
August. 1963. He v\as a native ol 
Doncaster, Maryland, and also held a 
Master's Degree in '16. in chemistrj 
and bacteriology from Georg; Wash- 
ington University. He had a long and 
admirable career with Du Pont Com- 
pany, with whom he ultimately became 
national manager of automotive sales ol 
fabrics and finishes. 



1920-1929 

Franklin Murray Benson, ll.b. 
'23, of Baltimore, Maryland died on 
June 14, 1963. He was a Baltimore 
attorney, civic leader and former city 
and state official. Among many other 
appointments, he served as a member 
of the State Department of Economic 
Development and the Lexington Market 
Authority. He was president of the 
board of managers of the Maryland 
General Hospital and chairman of the 
board of trustees of Western Maryland 
College, which awarded him an honor- 
ary degree in 1955. 

John M. Lescure, Agr. '23. residing 
in Baltimore, is a native of Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. He served as an Infantry 
Officer with the Army in Wo _ ld War I. 
He was president of Western Maryland 
Dairy before it became part of Sealtest's 
Eastern Division. He became general 
manager for Sealtest Foods in Balti- 
more, and retired as of last November 
after 26 years with that company. 

Eugene McInnis, ll.b. '23, a native 
of Oregon, died in Baltimore during 
1963. He practiced law for 30 years 
despite having been blinded by a World 
War I wound. He was only two semes- 
ters away from completing an engineer- 
ing course at Washington University 
when he entered the armed forces dur- 
ing which service he was wounded and 
left completely blind. He was a mem- 
ber of the Delta Theta Phi legal frater- 
nity, an honorary member of the Rotary 
Club of Portland, Oregon and the past 
president of the Blind Veterans Associ- 
ation. 

John E. Faber, Agr. '26, M.S. '27 and 
Ph.D. '37, chairman of Maryland's 
athletic council and head of the Univer- 
sity's Department of Microbiology was 
elected to the Lacrosse Hall of Fame. 
An all-America lacrosse player in 1927, 



and captain oi the i I i 

h.is .i I ! yeai *.i>.u hii 
alma matei He turned o 
tional lacrosse champions '■ 

H.- u.is chosen coach ol the 
He is .i native ol H 
spire, Pennsj Ivania 

\ H B FlSHl I 

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania has retired 
fro ii Koppers Co., Inc ha hed 

the po lit on ol chiel eng •■ ith thai 

in ii I le h.is since t iken .i position 
with Jacob Engineering Inc. in the 
Pittsburgh area as vice president ol thai 
concern. 

I i son B Olds, hi. A&S 28, oi 
Chevj ( hase, Maryland died on Fanu 
arj i. 196 \. He was a native W 
toman. was elected president ol the 

Stock exchange in 1943 and president 
Ol the bond club in l ( >46. He was a 
partner in the \laekall & ( oe unest 
ment banking firm. He was ,i member 
of several civic organizations, and was 
a trustee of the AckJand Museum at the 
University of North Carolina. 

Robert Lee I vans. I ngr., '29 ol 
Arlington. Virginia, has been promoted 
to group head in the new General 

Engineering and Industrial Arts Opera- 
tion of the U. S. Patent Office. 

Hubert A. NELSON, D.D.S. '30, re- 
siding in Amityville. New York, passed 
away on August 2. 1963. 



1930-1939 

Joseph D. Caldera. A&S '31. is a 
Major General with the USAF. cur- 
rently Assistant for Mutual Security. 
Deputy Chief of Staff Systems and 
Logistics at Headquarters. USAF. He 
currently received the Legion of Merit 
(2nd Oak Leaf Cluster) for exception- 
ally meritorious conduct in the out- 
standing service to the U.S. from July 
1960-June 1963. He is a native ol 
Fairmont. West Virginia. He has been 
in active service since the Fall of 1932. 

Mark Schweizer, m.s. '31, Ph.D. 
'41, a native of Switzerland, died late in 
the Fall of 1963. He was a long time 
member of the Foreign language 
Department of the University o\ Mary- 
land. He received his early education 
in his native country an I came to 
the United States in 1920. beginning 
his teaching career at the University 
in 1929. He was elected a member 
Of Phi Kappa Phi in 1941, and was 
in charge of the Junior Year of the 
University in Zurich. Switzerland in 
1946-47.' 

G. Clifford Byrd. Agr. "3 1. a bac- 
teriologist and Federal employee, died 
on January 19, 1964. Mr. Byrd in- 
vented a heat-treating process for pre- 
serving the freshness of seafood and 
founded and operated a seafood labora- 
tory at Crisfield, Maryland, until join- 
ing the National Fisheries Institute in 
Washington as a technologist in 1954. 



January-February, 1964 



21 




Mr. Charles H. Rahe, Engr. '33, is 
a native of Baltimore, Maryland, now 
living at Emmaus, Pennsylvania. Fol- 
lowing service with the Chevrolet divi- 
sion of General Motors Corp. in Balti- 
more, he joined the Pennsylvania Water 
& Power Co. in 1937 as an electrical 
engineer. When that company merged 
into PP&L in 1955, he became gen- 
erating station engineer. He has just 
been appointed assistant to chief elec- 
trical-mechanical engineer, reporting on 
electrical engineering projects in the 
new System Power & Engineering Dept. 
of PP&L Co. 

Howard M. Biggs, Engr. '33, of 
Rockville, Maryland, has been ap- 
pointed as Chief of the Research Facil- 
ities Planning Branch (RFPB). The 
Division provides centralized scientific, 
technical, and engineering services to 
NIH medical research programs. Mr. 
Biggs joined NIH in January, 1963 as 
Acting Chief of RFPB. Before this he 
was an active member of the Washing- 
ton area construction industry. From 
1955-1962 he was with R.H.H. Spidel, 
Inc. He served with the U.S. Army in 
World War II, from 1940-1946, hav- 
ing attained the rank of Col. 

Robert E. Dunning, Engr. '33, who 
resided in Los Alamos, New Mexico, 
died on Oct. 20, 1963. He was chief 
of the AEC's construction branch. He 
was native of Washington, D. C. He 
had worked for the federal government 
since 1933, including military service 
from 1940 to 1948, having been dis- 
charged with the rank of lieutenant 
colonel. He was a member of the Amer- 
ican Society of Civil Engineers and was 
listed in "Who's Who in the West." 

F. L. Howard, A&S '34 of Silver 
Spring, Maryland died in October of 
1963. 



John E. Monk, A&S '34, residing in 
Montgomery County, Maryland, has 
been elected president of the Bank of 
Commerce, succeeding Thomas J. 
Groom. For 28 years he advanced 
through various departments of the bank 
and in February, 1961 was elected 
senior vice president in charge of loans 
and investment. He is active in the 
Washington Board of Trade, treasurer 
of the Rotary Club of Washington and 
a member of Robert Morris Assoc. He 
is also a member of Kappa Alpha 
Fraternity. 

Cecil Ball, m.a. '34, of Hyatts- 
ville, Maryland, collapsed while talking 
to a student in his office, and was pro- 
nounced dead on arrival at Leland 
Memorial Hospital in Riverdale. A 
member of the Maryland faculty since 
1932, Mr. Ball taught courses in 
English literature and linguistics. He 
also taught at the University's Balti- 
more campus and on the faculty of its 
Overseas Program. He was a native of 
Ditchley, Virginia. He also held a 
Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins. 

Olin C. Moultin, m.d. '34 of 
Reno, Nevada is presently an EENT 
specialist. He was LCDR with the 
United States Navy from January 1943- 
1946. He is a Diplomate of the Amer- 
ican Board of Ophthalmology; and be- 
longs to the AMA, FICS, American 
Academy of Ophthalmology and Oto- 
laryngology; and the Reno Surgical 
Society. 

Dr. Frank L. Howard, A&S, '34, 
Ph.D., '38, chief of the Pure Substances 
Section in the Analytical Chemistry 
Division at the National Bureau of 
Standards, U. S. Department of Com- 
merce, died of a heart attack October 
15, 1963, at the age of 50. An NBS staff 
member for over 26 years, Dr. Howard 
was born in Pueblo, Colorado in 1913. 
He joined the Bureau in 1937, and be- 
came leader of the group engaged in 
synthesis of hydrocarbons. During 
World War II he pursued research 
aimed at improving aviation gasoline. 
Following the War he turned his atten- 
tion to the study of jet fuel and the 
phenomena of combustion. He was 
appointed Acting Chief of the Engine 
Fuels Section in 1949, and during that 
same year was the recipient of the 
Commerce Department's Silver Medal 
for Meritorious Service. In 1951 he 
was named Chief of the Engine Fuels 
Section, and remained in that post 
until 1960 when he was appointed 
Chief of the Pure Substances Section. 

Col. Thomas P. Corwin, A&S '35, 
of Denver, Colorado was promoted to 
the rank of Brigadier General in August, 
1963 by the President. General Corwin 
assumed command of the Air Force 
Accounting & Finance Center on March 
14, 1963, after having served as Vice 
Commander since July, 1962. Prior to 
coming to the Center, he was Assistant 
Vice Commander of the Air Force Sys- 
tems Command. He is a native of 



Washington, D. C. where for a time 1 e 
served as a lawyer in civilian life and 
financial management specialist with tie 
Air Force for many years. He at ore 
time was associated with Riggs National 
Bank, and received a LL.B. degree from 
Georgetown University Law School in 
1942. He entered active service in 
1941. 

Gerson A. Freedman, d.d.s. '35 is 
a resident of Baltimore, Maryland. He 
has been named president-elect of the 
Baltimore City Dental Society. He is 
also chief of dental service at Levindale 
Hospital. He received his post graduate 
training at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania and Columbia Universities. He 
has served as editor of the Alumni 
Journal, University of Maryland Dental 
School. 

Dominic T Battaglia, m.d. '35 of 
Poplar Ridge, Anne Arundel Co., died 
in April, 1963. He was an attending 
physician at several hospitals in Balti- 
more. He was a Naval Lieutenant 
Commander during World War II. He 
was a member of the Medical and Chir- 
urgical Faculty, American Society of 
Abdominal Surgeons, a Fellow of the 
American College of Surgeons and a 
Fellow of the International College of 
Surgeons. 

John R. Small, A&S '35, residing in 
New London, Connecticut, is currently 
with Thames Broadcasting Corporation 
WNLC, at New London, Connecticut 
as a show producer and account execu- 
tive. He has held several positions pre- 
viously, including educational adviser. 
Civilian Conservation Corps, U.S. Dept. 
of Interior, teacher in the Montgomery 
County, Maryland, School System. He 
served as a lieutenant in the U. S. 
Coast Guard from 1942-1946; and then 
went into the publication business at 
Provincetown, Massachusetts as owner 
& editor of The New Beacon. From 
1947-1952 served as elected member 
of Provincetown's Board of Selectmen, 
and as chairman of Assessors. He was 
recalled to active duty with the Coast 
Guard from 1952-1954, at which time 
he joined his present employers. 

(Mrs.) J. Finley Cheston, A&S '36 
is a housewife and residing in Silver 
Spring, Maryland. 

E. P. Flint, p.h.d. '36, currently of 
Rockford, Illinois, on April 29, 1963 
received national recognition in the 
ceramic field, when he was made a Fel- 
low of The American Ceramic Society 
in a ceremony at the Society's 65th An- 
nual Meeting in Pittsburgh. Mr. Flint 
is assistant to the president at Ipsen 
Industries, Inc., Rockford, Illinois. He 
is a member of the Society's Basic Sci- 
ence Division, and of The National 
Institute of Ceramic Engineers. He 
holds several patents and has published 
a number of papers on his research 
work. 

W. Kennedy Waller, A&S '28, 
m.d. '36 of Baltimore, Maryland, died 
January 6, 1964. He served as intern 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 




Members and guests of the Maryland Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi. national honor 
society, met for the society's 54th annual initiation banquet, January 20 in the 
Student Union at College Park. 

Phi Kappa Phi elects to its membership senior and graduate students who are 
in the upper ten percent of their class from all colleges and schools of the Univer- 
sity. Faculty members who have distinguished themselves in scholarly endeavor 
are also elected. President and faculty advisor is Dr. J. Allen Cook, Professor of 
Marketing. 



illness He was 48 fears old. 
was a member ol th <.t 

directors and vice president 
Home Building Association and 
president ol Woodward «v Norri 
the i niversitj ol Maryland, he 
three letters in sports and in his senior 
year, was selected first-string end o 
.ill Maryland football team Hi owned 
several hoists that raced locally, includ- 
ing Kerfoot, Fallen \ngel and Gum 

t I I MORGI NROl H In I'll ■ 

ol Baltimore, Maryland, is owner-part 
ner ol a pharmacy He served with the 
armed forces from 1941 1946 He is 
presently president ol the Maryland 
Pharmaceutical Assoc., and has been 
president ol the Baltimore Pharmaceuti 
cal Assoc, and iIk- Alumni Association 
ol the School ol Phamacy, Ik- belongs 

to Rho-Chi, National I'h. inn Honoi 

He is also a Fellow ol the American 

College of Apothecaries. 



at University Hospital from 1936-1938, 
and was then a resident until the end of 
1939. He was a fellow in medicine 
with Dr. Maurice C. Pincoffs from 
1939 until 1942, when he entered the 
Army Medical Corps. He was Co- 
manager of General Hospital 42 in the 
Australian Bush for soldiers wounded 
in the South Pacific. The hospital was 
staffed by personnel from University 
Hospital. He was discharged with the 
rank of Colonel in 1945, when he 
joined the faculty of the University of 
Maryland Medical School as a medical 
associate. He was made an associate 
professor in 1963. He was a member 
of many medical societies. 

Theodore H. Erbe, A&S '36, of 
Baltimore, Maryland, during 1963 was 
notified of membership in the 1963 
Million Dollar Round Table of the 
National Association of Life Under- 
writers. All members of this organiza- 
tion must have sold at least a million 
dollars of life insurance in 1962, or 
else must have met the special require- 
ments for Life membership by their 
million-dollar-a-year sales in prior 
years. Mr. Erbe is employed by 
Travelers of Baltimore, Maryland. 

Alvan A. Welfeld, m.d. '38, of 
Baltimore, Maryland passed away on 
August 21, 1963. 

Walter C. Gakenheimer, Pharm. 
'38, currently residing in Wilmington, 
Delaware, has been appointed technical 
director of the international division, 
Atlas Chemical Industries, Inc. He was 
formerly with The Stuart Company at 
Pasadena, California and with Merck & 
Co., at Rahway, New Jersey. He was 
born in Baltimore. He is the author 
of numerous publications, holds patents 
in the field of pharmaceutical technol- 
ogy. He is a member of the American 
Pharmaceutical Assoc, American Chem- 
ical Soc, N.Y. Academy of Science, 
American Assoc, for the Advancement 



of Science, Sigma Xi, Rho Chi, and Phi 
Delta Chi. He has served for the Amer- 
ican Red Cross and Blood Bank. 

John H. Beers, A&S '39, was re- 
cently elected president of the Mont- 
gomery County Board of Realtors. He 
is a resident of Chevy Chase. Maryland. 
He is secretary-treasurer of Beers 
Brothers, Silver Spring Realtors, and is 
a certified property manager. 

Abner Brenner, ph.d. '39, lives in 
Chevy Chase, Maryland. He is cur- 
rently the Chief of the Electrolysis and 
Metal Deposition Section in the NBS 
Metallurgy Division, and has recently 
published a massive two-volume treatise 
entitled "Electrodeposition of Alloys," 
which represents the most comprehen- 
sive treatment of this subject in the 
field. Dr. Brenner is a recipient of the 
Commerce Department's Gold Medal 
for Exceptional Service for his contri- 
butions to the development of the tech- 
nology of electroplating, and its appli- 
cation to problems in industry and 
government. Dr. Brenner has been an 
NBS staff member since 1930, and is 
the author of many publications. He 
is also the holder of 22 patents. He 
holds memberships in the American 
Chemical Society, the American Elec- 
troplaters' Society, the Institute of 
Metal Finishing, the Electro-chemical 
Society, and the Washington Associa- 
tion of Scientists. 

George Knepley, Educ. '39, re- 
sides in Falls Church. Virginia. He is 
Staff Assistant to the Commercial Man- 
ager of the Washington Gas Light Com- 
pany, Washington, D. C. He served for 
three years with the U. S. Air Force 
and held the rank of Captain. He is a 
very active member of the University 
of Maryland "M" Club. 

John J. McCarthy, '39, Washington. 
D. C. real estate and savings and loan 
executive, died recently at Georgetown 
University Hospital after a lingering 



1940-1949 

Joslph S. Mi kkii i. Jr.. Agr. '40. ol 
Dundalk. Maryland, has been named 
president of the Allied Florists Associa- 
tion of Greater Baltimore. He served in 
the Army Air Corps for three years, 
and carried the rank of First Lieu- 
tenant. Mr. Merritt is a past president 
of the Middle-Atlantic Florists Associa- 
tion, a past president of the Dundalk 
Rotary Club, and has been very active 
in church work. He is a member of the 
board of managers of the Dundalk 
YMCA. 

Howard H. Fawcett, A&S '40 is a 
native of Cumberland. Maryland, now 
living in Burnt Hill. N.Y. He is em- 
ployed as a safety engineer at the Gen- 
eral Electric Research Laboratory, and 
has been presented the William H. 
Cameron Award, as general chairman 
of the Chemical Section of the National 
Safety Council. He has been on the 
General Flectric Research Laboratory 
staff since 1948. Previously he was em- 
ployed by E. I. DuPont de Nemours \ 
Company. 

George E. Lawrenc t -.. BPA '40. of 
Hanover, Pennsylvania, was appointed 
vice president of sales of the Hanover 
Canning Company in June oi 1963. 
He has been with the Company since 
Jan. 1. 1946, and was appointed sales 
manager shortly thereafter. 

Judith King Manning. BPA '40, a 
resident of Silver Spring. Maryland 
died in June of 1963. She was born in 
Washington. D.C. and was an accom- 
plished amateur musician. She was a 
member of Kappa Delta Sorority. 

Hei en B. Fit dberg, H.Fc. '41. lives 
in Silver Spring. Maryland. She is a 
homemaker at present. She also holds a 
Master of Nursing degree from Yale 

University, and previously was assistant 

supervisor, OBS Ward, at the New 
Haven Hospital, a 1st It. with the 



January-February, 1964 



23 




HOW 
SUCCESSFUL 

ARE 
YOU? 



We'd say success is doing what you most 
want to do . . . knowing that you do it 
well . . . and reaping certain tangible 
rewards in the process 

How successful are you? If you're an en- 
gineer on a treadmill ... if you're not 
working on the sort of projects that inter- 
est you most ... if you feel that your 
special abilities and experience are being 
wasted ... if you're not satisfied with the 
salary you're making or feel hemmed in 
with restrictions . . . then it looks like a 
change is in order. 

Let's talk about you and a future with 
Westinghouse. Here are stimulating as- 
signments in molecular electronics, bi- 
onics, optical physics, LASER, advanced 
weapons systems and dozens of challeng- 
ing fields. You can combine project work 
with pursuit of advanced degrees at Johns 
Hopkins, Maryland or George Washing- 
ton. Your career will flourish at Westing- 
house . . . "The engineer's company." 

To arrange an interview call 

SOuthfield 1-1000, Ext. 510 or 860 

or send resume to: 

L. M. Adkins, Dept. 404 



.-..Westinghouse 

VV J DEFENSE AND SPACE CENTER 




Aerospace BALTIMORE 

P.O. Box 1693 
Baltimore, Md. 21203 



Systems 
Underseas 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 



Army Nurse Corps, and a staff nurse 
with the D. C. Health Dept. 

Neal Hathaway, BPA '42 of Weston, 
Connecticut died September 3. 1963. 
He was a member of ATO. 

Robert R. Ayres, Jr., BPA '42, UC 
'60, living in Bladensburg, Maryland, 
has retired as a Lt. Col., USMC after 
22 years of service. He is now an Asso- 
ciate of the nationally known financial 
planning firm of J. D. Marsh & Asso- 
ciates, Inc. and works in D. C. 

Bessie A. Rich, Educ. '42, is now 
living in Baltimore, Maryland. She is a 
teacher at Forest Park High School 
in Baltimore, and formerly taught at 
Dundalk Elementary School in Balti- 
more County, and the Clara Barton 
Vocational School of Baltimore City. 
She belongs to a number of organiza- 
tions including the National Education 
Association. 

Irwin J. Schumacher, Engr. '42, 
of Washington, D. C, is a senior pro- 
ject engineer at the Research & Devel- 
opment Center, U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. In 
December, 1963, he learned he had 
won $1,000 in a national contest spon- 
sored by the H. J. Heinz Company to 
name its "Tomato Man." 

Milton H. Vandenberg, A&S '43, 
a Baltimore sales executive, has been 
named general manager of the Bulk & 
Institutional Division of McCormick & 
Company, Inc. He joined McCormick 
& Company in October 1962 as sales 
manager of Gilroy Foods, Inc., a sub- 
sidiary of McCormick & Company. He 
was also elected to the Board of Direc- 
tors of the California subsidiary. Pre- 
viously he had been a sales executive 
with the National Brewing Company of 
Baltimore. Mr. Vandenberg was an 
honor graduate at the University of 
Maryland, and had an outstanding 
athletic career. He was captain of the 
lacrosse team and was selected as a 
member of the All-Maryland, the All- 
South and the All-American Lacrosse 
teams while in College. He served in 
the Army during World War II, and 
holds the Purple Heart for wounds re- 
ceived in combat. He has also been 
very active in many civic groups. 

Henry S. Hohouser, d.d.s. '43, is a 
resident of Suitland, Maryland and is 
currently practicing dentistry. He was 
in service with the armed forces from 
1943 to 1946, and holds the rank of 
Captain. 

Ramon Grelecki, Educ. '43, lives in 
San Francisco, California. Since 1949 
he has been the president and owner 
of R. Grelecki & Co., manufacturers 
representatives for Pacific/ Far East 
Area. 

Cornelia M. Cotton, ph.d. '43, a 
resident and native of Bethesda. died 
during the spring of 1963. She was a 
microbiologist with the University of 
Maryland for more than 20 years. She 
was known for her research on brucel- 
losis, a disease also referred to as un- 



dulant fever, which she contractec 
while experimenting with guinea pigs 
She had also taught at Texas State 
College and American University. Sht 
was faculty adviser to Delta Gamm; 
social sorority, and a member of the 
American Association of Universin 
Women. She also belonged to tht 
American Society for Microbiologists 
Sigma Xi, The Sanitary Association and 
the Conference of Researchers Working 
on Animal Diseases. 

Melvin S. Cagen, Engr. '45, pres- 
ently lives in Rochester, N.Y. Kordite 
Corporation has announced his appoint- 
ment as manager of manufacturing for 
the Films Division. He has served Kor- 
dite as technical superintendent, and 
also as commercial development pro- 
ject manager. Prior to joining Kordite, 
Mr. Cagen was associated with Olin 
Mathieson Chemical Corporation and 
Heyden Chemical Corporation. He is a 
member of the A.I.CH.E, Society of 
Plastic Engineers and the American 
Chemical Society. 

Albert M. Mattocks, ph.d. '45. 
technical director of the R. P. Scherer 
Corporation, and former Professor of 
Pharmacy at the University of Mich- 
igan, has rejoined the University of 
Michigan faculty as Professor of Phar- 
macy and Coordinator of Hospital 
Pharmacy Education and Research. 

Robert M. Callaway, Jr., BPA '48 
of Charlottesville, Virginia, has been 
named agency director of a new Wash- 
ington office of the State Farm Mutual 
Automobile Insurance Co. 

Edwin A. Gee, ph.d. '48, who lives 
in Wilmington, Delaware, was ap- 
pointed director of the Development 
Department of the Du Pont Company 
recently. He joined Du Pont in 1948, 
and became one of the nation's out- 
standing authorities on titanium metal, 
and has written numerous publications 
in the field. He has served on many 
advisory committees for the govern- 
ment. He has served Du Pont in many 
capacities. He was assistant chief metal- 
lurgist of the United States Bureau of 
Mines prior to joining Du Pont. He is 
a member of the American Chemical 
Society, American Society of Metals. 
American Institute of Mining and 
Metallurgical Engineers, Delaware So- 
ciety of Professional Engineers, Sigma 
Xi, and Alpha Chi Sigma Fraternity. 

John M. Buchness, m.d. '48, a resi- 
dent of Bethesda, Maryland has been 
appointed assistant to the Deputy 
Director of the National Institutes of 
Health. He was formerly chief of the 
Foreign Operations Branch in the Divi- 
sion of Foreign Quarantine. After com- 
pleting his internship at Mercy Hospital 
in Baltimore, he joined the Public 
Health Service Commissioned Corps in 
which he served continuously. His 
Public Health Service career has been 
marked by a number of increasingly 
responsible assignments. He is a Diplo- 
mate of the American Board of Internal 



\ 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



Medicine and an associate member of 
The American College of Physicians. 
He is also a member of the American 
Medical Association, Public Health 
Service Clinical Society, and Associa- 
tion of Military Surgeons of the U.S. 
He was elected to Who's Who Among 
Students in American Colleges, and was 
president of his class for three years at 
the University of Maryland. 

Henry S. Bausum, A&S '49, a native 
of Annapolis, Maryland, is now residing 
in Jefferson City, Tennessee. He is cur- 
rently a professor in the History and 
Political Science Department of Carson- 
Newman College, and has just success- 
fully completed his work for a Ph.D. 
degree from the University of Chicago. 
Before joining the faculty of Carson- 
Newman College, he taught in the 
Chicago public school system. 

Charles Curtis, A&S '49, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. has been named advertis- 
ing manager for Kroehler Mfg. Co. He 
previously was general manager of 
Curtis Brothers Furniture Co. in Wash- 
ington, D. C. He joined Kroehler in 
June of 1962 as a sales representative 
in Colorado and Wyoming, and in June 
of 1963 was named a division merchan- 
dise manager. He is a native of Wash- 
ington, D. C. and prior to receiving his 
degree from Maryland attended Cor- 
nell and George Washington Universi- 
ties. He served as a Lieutenant in the 
United States Air Force during World 
War II. 

Charles Sheldon Bresler, BPA 
'49, lives in Chevy Chase, Maryland. 
He served with the Armed Services dur- 
ing World War II in the Counter In- 
telligence Corps. He has been presi- 
dent of Act Home Corporation, 
Montgomery Associates, Charles Burton 
Builders, Inc. His civic activities are 
legion. 

Neal J. Edwards, BPA '49, of 
Bethesda, Maryland is manager of 
WMAL Television. He was a Captain 
with the USAF from 1942-1945. He 
holds memberships in the Sigma Nu 
Fraternity, the Washington Board of 
Trade, Advertising Club of Washington. 

J. Trevor McIntyre, Engr. '49, 
lives in Rockville, Maryland. Opera- 
tions Research Incorporated announced 
recently that Mr. McIntyre has been 
appointed to the senior staff of the 
Logistics & Operations Division. He 
comes to ORI after eleven years with 
Research Analysis Corporation. 



1950-1959 

J. Donald Clagett, Jr., A&S '50, 
who resides in Silver Spring, Maryland, 
has been appointed as assistant secre- 
tary and manager of the Hyattsville 
Bldg. & Loan Association's new branch 
office in Bethesda, Maryland. He has 
been an appraiser-inspector with the 
association since 1955. 

January-February, 1964 



WILLIAMS 






CONSTRUCTION 






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Highways — Bridges — 


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ALL MEAT FRANKS 

Every ounce of the pure beef and 
pork in Esskay's all-meat Franks 
is carefully selected by Esskay's 
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these famous franks to whole- 
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sure to ask for Esskay Franks — 
they're the finest made! They're 
on sale in the Byrd Stadium and 
new Student Activities Building. 
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Bard-Avon School 
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Complete secretarial training 
9 months 

Special and pre-college eouraea 

3 months and 6 months 

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1- or 2-year courses 

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July. September .V: February 

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distributed by 
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3801 37th Place 
779-8800 Brentwood, Md. ^Byj^ca 




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FEED 

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EASTON. MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 



McLeod & Romborg 

Stone Co., Inc. 

— •— 

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— •— 
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25 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

RE 
5-3000 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

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RE 
5-3000 








WASHINGTON 21, D.C. 







Bacon for 
breakfast 




Del Haven White House Motel 

COLLEGE PARK, MD. 

Baltimore-Washington Boulevard 

2 Miles North — University of Maryland 

AAA — Duncan Hines — Restaurant 

Heat — Air Conditioning — Free TV 

Room Phnnes GRanite 4-6565 




Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 

Baltimore 24, Md. 



Albert F. Goetze, Inc 

CHOICER MEATS 
Baltimore, Md. 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 

Phone VErnon 7-8400 

Baltimore, Md. 

minimum* 



ARUNDEL FEDERAL 

Savings and Loan Association 

PATAPSCO AVE. & FOURTH ST. 



Baltimore 25, Md. 




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Does MAKE A DIFFERENCE 

Savings accounts insured up 

to $10,000 — Federal Savings & 
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355-9300 



-.-• 



BERGMANN'S LAUNDRY 

"Became Quality GcutdclauA-" 

PLANT: 621-27 G STREET, N.W. REpublic 7-5400 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

BRANCH OFFICE: HYATTSVIILE, MD. WArfleld 7-0880 



Richard L. Blanco, BPA '50, of 
Marietta, Ohio, a member of the facult* 
of Marietta College since 1960, has re- 
cently been advanced to the rank of 
Associate Professor. 

William Rosenberg. Engr. '50, a 
resident of Baltimore, Maryland was 
recently appointed to the position of 
manager of Universal Machine Com- 
pany, after having previously served as 
chief engineer of that concern. 

John P. Young, Engr. '50, lives in 
Baltimore, Maryland. He received his 
doctor of engineering degree in Oper- 
ations Research at the Johns Hopkins 
University in 1962, where he is a lec- 
turer at the School of Engineering Sci- 
ence, and assistant director of the Oper- 
ations Research Division in the health 
services of the Hospital. Previously he 
has been an industrial engineer for 
Westinghouse Electric Corp. 

Albert S. Salkowski, Engr. '50, is 
a resident of Lutherville, Maryland. For 
the past six years he has been employed 
as a supervisor in Structural Design in 
the Bureau of Engineering of Baltimore 
County. He has received his LL.B. 
degree from the University of Mary- 
land School of Law, and an ABA de- 
gree in accounting from the Baltimore 
College of Commerce. 

Donald Westra, UC '50, of Wash- 
ington, D. C. has been appointed by 
the Ohio State University Board of 
Trustees as an assistant dean for devel- 
opment in the College of Medicine, 
effective April 1. Formerly Mr. Westra 
was executive officer to the Surgeon 
General of the U.S. Air Force, super- 
vising medical installations throughout 
the world. Before 1957 he served as 
a staff officer in military medical assign- 
ments for the department of defense. 
He is a native of Randolph, Wisconsin. 
He also has an LL.B. degree from St. 
Mary's University Law School, San 
Antonio, Texas. 

Edward D. Sacks, BPA '51, of 
Washington, D. C, and president of 
the Bank of Bethesda since May 1, 
1962, was elected president of the 
Montgomery County Bankers Associa- 
tion in September 1963. He also grad- 
uated from the American Institute of 
Banking. 

Howard Krause, BPA '51 is a resi- 
dent of Baltimore, Maryland, and has 
been appointed senior brokerage con- 
sultant at the Connecticut General Life 
Insurance Company in Baltimore. 

William Rinehardt, P.E. '51, of 
Charlottesville, Virginia is now claim 
superintendent in the eastern region 
office of the State Farm Mutual Auto- 
mobile Insurance Co. His wife, the 
former Mary Ellen Travers of Laurel. 
Maryland is an A&S '50 graduate of the 
University of Maryland. 

Thomas J. Trainor, UC '51, of 
Dublin, Ireland, passed away on the 
18th of August, 1963. 

Walter H. Deyhle, BPA '52, of 
Chicago. Illinois died on January 4, 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



KOESTER'S 

TWINS 

PLEASE 



King Bros., Inc 

PRINTING & OFFSETTING 

SAratoga 7-5835 

208 N. Calvert Street 
BALTIMORE 2, MD. 




FEEDS 

SEEOS 

FERTILIZER 

LIMESTONE 

PETROLEUM PRODUCTS 



i Feed MO 3-3113 

FREDERICK \ 

I Petroleum MO 3-5422 
THURMONT 3111 MIDDLETOWN 6 



Maryland's Largest Locally Owned 
and Operated Cooperative 



1964. He was a former controller ol 
the Atomic Physics & Science Fund, 
Inc. in Washington. He had served lor 
several years with the Washington Mu- 
tual Fund, and previously had been a 
certified public accountant with the 
firm of Price. Waterhouse & I o Mr. 
Deyhle was an Army veteran ol the 
Korean War. He v\as a native ol Phila- 
delphia, but grew up in Washington, 
D. C. 

Arthur E. Biggs, BPA '51. living 
in Stamford, Connecticut has been ap- 
pointed assistant controller ol Mobil Oil 
Company, the operating division fol 
Socony Mobil Oil Company. Inc. in the 
United States and Canada. He v\as a 
consultant with McKinsey & Co., Inc., 
before joining Mobil in 1962. He also 
holds an M.B.A. degree in finance from 
the Harvard Graduate School of Busi- 
ness. 

Ait A. Hussain, Agr. '51, was re- 
cently appointed the Assistant Dean of 
the College of Agriculture for Scientific 
Research for the University of Baghdad 
in Iraq. He formerly held the position 
of Chairman of the Department of 
Entomology at the same institution. 

Vernon Benfer, Engr. '51, formerly 
of Baltimore, Maryland, during 1963 
was appointed as general manager of 
the Phoenix Division of Cannon Electric 
Company. Mr. Benfer comes to Can- 
non Electric with twenty years experi- 
ence in engineering and electronics, 
having been affiliated with Acoustica, 
as general manager; Pacific Airmotive 
Corp. as vice president of development; 
and with PAC subsidiary of Pacific 
Aero Engineering, as president. He was 
division manager for Lear, and just 
prior to joining Cannon, Mr. Benfer 
was president of Air Associates, a subsi- 
diary of Electronic Communication in 
Wichita. He also served two years as 
a pilot and navigation instructor for the 
U.S. Navy. 

Donald R. Jackson, BPA '52, a 
native of Bethesda, has resigned as 
treasurer of Hot Shoppes, Inc. to be- 
come assistant controller of Standard 
Brands, Inc., with offices in N. Y. He 
is a certified public accountant in Mary- 
land, and has been a director of 
The Financial Executives Institute, and 
of the Washington Chapter, National 
Association of Accountants. 

James R. Bookstaver, Engr. '52, of 
Endicott, N.Y., joined IBM in 1952, 
and last spring was promoted to mana- 
ger. Machine Technology & Communi- 
cations Systems in Product Engineering. 

Phin Cohen, m.d. '52, a native of 
Baltimore. Maryland, is now residing 
in Brookline, Massachusetts. Dr. 
Cohen has been promoted to the 
Faculty of Medicine at Harvard. 

Roderick Palmer, m.educ. '52. of 
Baton Rouge, Louisiana is a professor 
of English at Southern University, and 
a former teacher at Sumner High 
School. He has recently been appointed 
to the Commission of Listening Post 



HOTEL SUPPLY CO. 




BALTIMORE. MD. 



WINDOW - ON - THE - KITCHEN 

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DINNER Ouolily CoHee 5c a cup 

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11th Street Entrance of 

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NA 8 8140 



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Insulation 

Acoustical and Bricklaying 

Box 266 

COLLEGE PARK 

GR 4-4S00 MD. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, Inc. 

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Located In the Center of 
the Shopping Dittrict 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 

MU. 5-1990 BALTIMORE. MD. 



Buy U. S. Savings Bonds 

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January-February, 1964 



27 





gf gj . I! 



MJUH'i 



OLES ENVELOPE CORPORATION 

^Baltimore's Pioneer Onvelope ^Manufacturer 

Established 1912 

Office and Factory: 25th STREET & LOCH RAVEN ROAD 

Baltimore 18, Maryland CHesapeake 3-1520 

Washington Sales Office: 1500 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. 
Washington 5, D. C. 234-3979 



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Washington, D. C. 



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Construction Co., Inc. 

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BETHESDA, MD. 



OL 6-4545 • 




SALES • INSURANCE 

Near University of Maryland 

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WASHINGTON 6, D. C. 



FE 8-7880 



Monitors of the Phi Delta Kappan, a 
noted educational periodical of Phi 
Delta Kappa. 

Mary Perkins Stokes, A&S '53, 
who has been living in Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, will shortly move to 
Italy. From '56 to '58 she was an edi- 
torial proofreader for University of 
Washington Publications & Printing 
Plant, and from 1958 to 1960 worked 
as an Associate Editor on the U. of 
Washington Business Review. From 
1960 to 1961 she was an assistant edi- 
tor of the Yale Center of Alcohol 
Studies. From there she moved to Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, where she was 
assistant editor on the journal Ethnol- 
ogy, published by the U. of Pittsburgh. 
From 1963 to January 1964, she was 
employed by International Marketing 
Institute, working on The Gallatin An- 
nual of International Business, as man- 
aging editor. 

Albert Peter, Jr., Engr. '53 of 
Hyattsville, Maryland has been awarded 
a year of graduate training under a 
Ford Foundation grant. Currently he 
worked as a structural engineer with 
the General Service Administration in 
Washington, D. C, where he was chief 
trouble shooter for GSA's Public Build- 
ings Service. His first job was with the 
Washington Suburban Sanitary Com- 
mission as a construction engineer. Fol- 
lowing two brief periods with a con- 
sulting firm and a steel corporation, he 
joined GSA in 1956. Mr. Peter holds 
membership in the American Society of 
Civil Engineers, National Society of 
Professional Engineers and the Ameri- 
can Concrete Institute. He was with the 
armed services under Naval Aviation 
during 1945 and 1946. 

John F. Kirby, P.E. '53, living 
in Baltimore, Maryland, a veteran of 
fifteen years with the Bureau of Recre- 
ation of Baltimore City, has become 
supervisor of its boys' and men's activi- 
ties. Formerly he was director of the 
recreation centers at Gwynns Falls and 
Brooklyn Homes. He is a native of 
Williamsport, Pennsylvania. He is an 
Air Force veteran. 

Carroll D. House, Agr. '54, living 
in W. Hyattsville, Maryland has re- 
cently been promoted to project pro- 
grammer by the IBM Federal Systems 
Division. 

Evangeline Williams, Educ. '54, 
of Chevy Chase, Maryland died in 
October, 1963, after a very short ill- 
ness. 

Alice Ann Gates, Educ. '54 resid- 
ing in New Iberia, Louisiana, is a 
high school teacher. She recently was 
chosen to receive the Valley Ford 
Classroom Teachers medal from the 
Freedoms Foundation at Valley Forge. 
Miss Gates is the sponsor of the NIHS 
Civics Club. 

Gerald W. Longanecker, Engr. 
'54, is presently living in College Park, 
Maryland. He was the assistant project 
manager for America's newest scientific 



28 



the Maryland Magazine 



Sorority tea ? 
Fraternity party? 




order your favorite 

MRS. SMITH'S PIES 

So good ! So modestly priced ! 

just call 
JU 9-2818 

4 MRS. SMITH'S COLONIAL 
BAKING COMPANY 

Served in the University's own cafeteria 



NORTH 


WASHINGTON PRESS 


Inc. 


COMMERCIAL 


PRINTING 


5644 3rd Street, N.E. 


WASHINGTON, D. C. 


LA 6-8626 



M&uuncf. i-tudenti. and 

alumni o£ the 

tJniu&Uitif. ojj 

MaAyla+id 

4/ ifeaAi. 

LUSTinE 

Chevrolet 
Ol&Unoltile 

Phil J.udtine . . . 
head o^ both co+npani&L 

Baltimore Ave. on Route 1 
Hyattsville, A/Id. 
WArfield 7-7200 



satellite. Explorer XVIII, the Inter- 
planetary Monitoring Platform, He is 

a member of the AIAA. 

Robert R. Muller, bpa '54 who 

is employed by Fidelity Mutual Life at 
Philadelphia has received notification ol 
membership in the 196.1 Million Dollar 
Round Table of the National Associa- 
tion of Life Underwriters 

Thomas J. Holden, i i .b. '54, Engr. 
49, a resident of Baltimore for many 
years, was elected a director anil I ast- 
ern Regional vice president of the re- 
cently organized Baltimore-Washington 
Chapter of Strategic Industries Associa- 
tion. He is secretary and chief. Govern- 
ment Contracts Division of Aircraft 
Armaments, Inc., at Cockeysville. He 
was registered to practice in the U.S. 
Patent Office in 1952. Previously he 
has been affiliated with Bendix Radio 
Corporation, the Martin Company, and 
Phebco, Inc. He is a member of the 
National Association of Corporate 
Secretaries, and the Contract Negotia- 
tions Subcommittee of the National 
Security Industrial Assoc. 

Philip A. Ouellette, m.s. '55, liv- 
ing in New Jersey, has been appointed 
section head of Skin Product Develop- 
ment in the Toiletries Product Develop- 
ment Division of the Research & 
Development Department of Colgate- 
Palmolive Company. 

Joseph F. Lynch, Agr. '55, is a resi- 
dent of Baltimore, Maryland. He has 
recently been promoted to wholesale 
route supervisor by the Baltimore Dis- 
trict of Sealtest Foods. He formerly 
held the postion of wholesale solicitor. 
An Army veteran, he has been with 
Sealtest for six years. 

Charles Nicholas Lee, A&S '55, 
has been appointed to the Bucknell Uni- 
versity faculty as an assistant professor 
of Russian studies. Dr. Lee served as 
instructor in French, German and Rus- 
sian at the University of Maryland 
from 1956 to 1960, when he entered 
Harvard University to study for a doc- 
torate, which he received this past year. 

Jared Jules Collard, A&S '55, of 
Spokane, Washington, was appointed a 
career Foreign Service Officer by the 
late President Kennedy. The appoint- 
ment makes him a Vice Consul and a 
Secretary in the Diplomatic Service. 
He is a native of Madison, Wisconsin. 
Prior to joining the State Department, 
he served in the United States Army 
from 1955 to 1957. From 1958 to 1962 
he was with the United States Foreign 
Service Staff in Manila and Tehran. 

Helen Virginia Linthicum, m. educ. 
'55, who lives at Flintstone, Maryland 
is a public school teacher at the Junior 
High level, teaching English and Social 
Studies. Previously she was a social 
worker. She belongs to a number of 
teachers' associations, among which are 
the National Education Association, 
National Council of Teachers of 
English, and the Maryland State Teach- 
ers' Association. 



The gathering />I<ki- fot 
Marylandera of Good /'/«./-■ 




DUKE ZEIBERT'S 2 

RESTAURANT 
1722 L Street 

(Two doors wot of Conn. Ava.) 

STerling 3-1730 

Optn 'til Midnight— Sunday 'til 10 p m 



fe_u 



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INCORPORATED 



SUPPLYING 

EVERY 
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NEED 



Since 



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Phone— Executive 3-8120 

815 TENTH STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C 



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January-February, 1964 



2 l ) 



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WASHINGTON. D. C. 

AREA CODE 202 
832-6533 



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Day & Evening Classes 

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Secretarial (Medical & Legal) 

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600 Equitable Bldg. LE 9-5626 



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I MASONRY SUPPLIES I 


I BRICK - CINDER BLOCK j 


I River Rd. at B & O R.R. 01 4-1616 ', 


j BETHESDA, MD. j 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pesf Control Service And Products 

928 EYE STREET. N.W. 

Washington 1. D. C. NAtional 8-6478 






SWEETHEART 

Enriched Bread 

IT'S DELICIOUS 

SALISBURY. MARYLAND 



Paul F. Wire, Educ. '55, currently 
of Bethesda, Maryland, has been pro- 
moted to senior associate programmer, 
Goddard Programming Dept., Project 
Mercury, Space Systems by Interna- 
tional Business Machines Corporation. 
Ruth S. Kuntz, Educ. '55, of Wel- 
lesley, Massachusetts, is now a home- 
maker, having just finished a year as 
Intern in the Dept. of Children's Work 
of the National Council of Churches. 
Bruce L. Berlage, Agr. '56, of Ken- 
sington, Maryland entered the real 
estate business, in September of 1964, 
was elected vice president of J. D. 
Riviere & Co., Inc., Realtors of Wash- 
ington, D. C. He is manager of the 
Syndication and Investment Property 
Dept. of the Riviere firm and serves as 
general partner in numerous investment 
property syndicates. 

John P. McKee, A&S '56, now resid- 
ing in Missouri, has been named pen- 
sion supervisor for Pacific Mutual Life 
in St. Louis, Missouri. A member of 
Phi Delta Theta, he was also on the 
varsity baseball team from 1953 to 
1955. Following graduation he served 
as a lieutenant in the Air Force, and 
in 1958 joined Pacific Mutual Life. In 
1961 he was made manager of the com- 
pany's New Orleans Group insurance 
office. 

Stanley T. Piszkin, Jr., Engr. '56, 
is living in San Diego, Cailifornia. He 
has been with the Convair Division of 
General Dynamics since 1956. 

Robert W. Glenn, m.d. '56, a 
native of Illinois, and presently living in 
Canton, has just recently been ap- 
pointed staff physician. Health Center 
& McKinley Hospital and Assistant 
Professor of Hygiene. Formerly he was 
a partner of the Glenn Maguire Clinic 
in Canton. Previously he was an intern, 
Santa Clare County Hospital, at San 
Jose, California; chief physician of Illi- 
nois State Penitentiary at Menard; pri- 
vate practice in Canton for five years; 
chief surgery resident of St. Luke's 
Hospital, Chicago; U. S. Army, 1944- 
46. 

Sheldon Friedman, Pharm. '56, a 
native of Baltimore, Maryland has 
joined Eli Lilly & Co. as a salesman in 
Takoma Park, Maryland. Prior to his 
joining Eli Lilly & Co., he was manager 
of pharmacies in Baltimore & Hagers- 
town. He is a member of Alpha Zeta 
Omega, pharmacy recognition society. 
Charles E. Billinger, BPA, '57, 
Lt. Col. USAF, (Ret.) has completed 
his teaching credential requirements at 
the University of California, and has 
accepted a position on the faculty of 
Norte Vista High School in Riverside, 
California. 

Harvey A. Wallskog, Engr. '57, re- 
cently joined the staff of the Genera! 
Scientific and Administrative Depart- 
ment at the University of California 
Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in 
Livermore, California. 



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Are Compounded and Paid 

Quarterly! 

District 7-2370 

RrstR]deral 

jgfaiH>na& and 9£ca>n juMocuUton 

OF WASHINGTON 

610 — 13th Street, N.W. 

Bethesda Branch 
8216 Wisconsin Avenue 



Anchor Fence 

Anchor Post Products, Inc. 

Washington & Virginia Areas 

671-7000 

Baltimore 

ME 3-6500 

BETHESDA OLiver 2-5270 

TOWSON VAIley 5-7133 

ANNAPOLIS __ _ COIonial 8-3451 

GEN BURNIE _..SOuthfield 1-0190 

HAVRE DE GRACE ENterprise 9-6500 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

1701 SAINT PAUL STREET 
Baltimore 2, Md. 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 



B. Lucile Bowie, ed.d. '57, living 
in W. Hyattsville, Maryland, is an 
Associate Professor of Education at the 
University of Maryland. Previously she 
was Supervisor of Elementary Schools, 
Charles County, Maryland; an elemen- 
tary school teacher; and a Grant Foun- 
dation Fellow, Institute for Child Study, 
at the University of Maryland. She he- 
longs to Phi Delta Gamma, and Delta 
Kappa Gamma, having held the posi- 
tion of president of both local chapters. 
She belongs to many educational asso- 
ciations, among which are the National 
Education Association, American 
Assoc, of University Professors and the 
American Assoc, for the Advancement 
of Science. She has had many articles 
published. 

Joseph H. Ross, ph.d. '57, is now a 
research chemist with American Cyana- 
mid Co. 

Richard W. Seltzer, D. Educ. '57, 
residing in Bristol, Pennsylvania, is now 
Superintendent of Bristol Borough 
Schools. 

James S. Furst, Mil. Sc. '58, Cap- 
tain, USMC Ret., of Triangle, Virginia 
has recently received membership in the 
1963 Million Dollar Round Table of 
the National Association of Life Under- 
writers. 

Samuel M. Meredith, Agr. '58, was 
recently appointed sales contractor for 
the Upjohn Company's Washington 
Branch. He joined Upjohn in Febru- 
ary, 1961 and was assigned the Balti- 
more sales territory. 

Doris Walter Laber, BPA, '58, liv- 
ing in Chicago. Illinois, is presently 
employed as Information Specialist with 
the Agricultural Marketing Service, 
USDA. Previously she was assistant 
editor of the Extension Service Review. 

Robert H. Brubaker, Jr., Educ. 
'58, has recently been promoted by 
International Business Machines Cor- 
poration to the position of senior asso- 
ciate programmer in the Navy Systems 
Dept. 

John W. Newland, Educ. '58, a 
former history teacher at Bladensburg 
Senior High School, died recently at 
Andrews Air Force Base Hospital of 
leukemia. He was 27. Mr. Newland 
was a native of Washington, raised in 
suburban Maryland and graduated from 
Bladensburg High School. He is sur- 
vived by his wife, Barbara Dawson 
Newland, a teacher at Northwestern 
High School, of Hyattsville; his parents; 
and a brother. 

F. Dwight Smith, BPA '59, has 
been appointed personnel manager of 
Suburban Trust Co. Previously he was 
assistant in the personnel department. 

Edward L. Clabaugh, A&S '60, of 
Los Angeles, California, has his law 
degree from Harvard Law School, and 
has recently joined the firm of Shep- 
pard, Mullin. Richter & Hampton. 

Basilio M. Liacuris, BPA '60, has 
begun a two-year assignment as a Peace 
Corps Volunteer in Ecuador. 

January-February, 1964 



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Serving Baltimore's Finest 
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Baltimore 2, Md. 



. — Closed Mondays 
Mil 5-281 1 

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Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
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WASHINGTON, D. C. 



PHONE 474-5100 



B. SUGRUE — PRES. 



NORMAN MO TOR C OMPANY Inc 

SALES 4 & f fyB SERVICE 

8315 WASHINGTON-BALTIMORE BLVD. • COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



VICTOR CUSHWA & SONS 


MANUFACTURERS OF "CALVERT" COLONIAL FACE BRICK 


Main Office and Plant 


WILLIAMSPORT, MD. 


Office and Warehouse 


137 INGRAHAM ST., N.E. WASHINGTON, D. C. 


440 JEFFERSON-DAVIS HWY. ARLINGTON, VA. 


Sales Representatives In Principal Eastern Cities 



LA 3-1551 



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ARISTOCRAT 

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614-620 MOSHER STREET 
BALTIMORE 17, MARYLAND 

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for all commercial establishments 

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modern 
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General Machine Work 

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Class 1928 
Insurance of all Kinds 

UNion 4-1100 

4316 GALLATIN STREET 
Hyattsville, Md. 



Student's Supply Store 

University of Maryland 

College Park Md. 




Alumni 
Headquarters for 

• CLASS RINGS 

• CLOTH GOODS 

• ETCHED GLASSWARE 

• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



THE SIXTIES 

Edwin B. Geisler, BPA '61 has 
been promoted by The International 
Business Machines Corporation to the 
position of senior accountant, Budg- 
etary & Manpower. 

Ray E. Hiebert, m.a. '61, Ph.D. 
'62, has recently been elected to the 
American Society of Journalism School 
Administrators and appointed regional 
observer for the Pulitzer Prize Com- 
mittee at Columbia University. 

John W. Newton, Jr., Engr. '61, a 
native of Sewickley, Pennsylvania, is 
currently living in Newark, Delaware. 
He was recently appointed to the Re- 
search and Development Division of 
Du Pont's Plastice Dept. at the Experi- 
mental Station near Wilmington. 

James McCleary, Agr. '62, lives at 
Chalfont, Pennsylvania. He has recently 
joined the Agricultural Field Testing 
Group at the Rohm & Hass. He was 
previously associated with the research 
division of W. R. Grace & Company, 
Clarksville, Maryland. 

Noriko Kamei, A&S '62, is a resi- 
dent of Gifu-Ken, Japan, and is pres- 
ently an instructor at Japan Women's 
University. 

Miss June Lee Walker, A&S '62, 
currently lives at Riverton, New Jersey. 
She has received one of two Margaret 
Earhart Smith Fund Fellowships. While 
at Maryland she was active in college 
affairs, having served on the Executive 
Board of the Faculty-Student Senate, 
Executive Council Member of the Stu- 
dent Government Association. She was 
also an exchange student at the Univer- 
sitat Miinchen in Germany. 

Robert M. Hayes, Engr. '62, of 
Holliston, Massachusetts, has joined the 
Dewey & Almy Chemical Division of 
the W. R. Grace & Co. as a project 
engineer in the Engineering Depart- 
ment. Formerly Mr. Hayes was with 
Hooker Chemical Corp. He is a mem- 
ber of the American Institute of Chem- 
ical Engineers. He is a native of Eliza- 
bethtown, N.Y. 

Raymond Richard Donadio, ll.b. 
'62, a native of Baltimore, has been ap- 
pointed a field claim representative in 
the Catonsville Office of the State Farm 
Mutual Automobile Insurance Co. 

Patrick G. Rinaldi, A&S '63, a resi- 
dent of Silver Spring, Maryland died 
in November, 1963. He was one of the 
first blue babies to undergo corrective 
surgery. 

Margaret Rose Blackburn, A&S 
'63 has recently been appointed to the 
Federal Service for career employment. 
Her position will be classified as editor. 

Robert Ross Robinson, BPA '63 of 
Takoma Park, Maryland has been 
named manager of the Top Value 
Enterprises Gift Redemption Center at 
White Oaks Shopping Center, Silver 
Spring, Maryland. 



32 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme Iron Works 28 

Alcazar 26 

American Disinfectant Co 30 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc 30 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc 32 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn. ... 26 

Bard Avon School 25 

Bayshore Foods, Inc 25 

Bergmann's Laundry 26 

Bethesda Cinder Block Mfg. Co., Inc 30 

Bon Ton Food Products 25 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 28 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 27 

Victor Cushwa & Sons 31 

Del Haven White House Motel 26 

Farmers Cooperative Assn 27 

J. H. Filbert 27 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 30 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 29 

Albert F. Goetze Packing Co 26 

Gray Concrete Pipe Co 26 

Harvey Dairy 29 

Hotel Harrington 27 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 27 

King Bros., Inc 27 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 27 

Lustine Chevrolet 29 

Maria's Restaurant 31 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 27 

Modern Machinists Co 32 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc 25 

North Washington Press, Inc 29 

Norman Motor Company, Inc 31 

Oles Envelope Corp 28 

Park Transfer Co 30 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 30 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc 25 

Seidenspinner Realtor 28 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 2<> 

Mrs. Smith's Colonial Baking Co 29 

Strayer College 30 

Student's Supply Store 32 

Sweetheart Bread 30 

Thomsson Steel Co., Inc 2& 

Wallop & Son, Insurance 28 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange Inc. . 31 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 24 

Perry O. Wilkinson 32 

Williams Construction Company, Inc 25 

York Wholesalers, Inc 31 

Duke Zeibert's Restaurant 



the Maryland Magazine 



FOOTBALL IN MAY! 

Watch Tom Nugent and his 1964 football team phis then 
final game of Spring practice, May 16 at 2 p.m. at Byrd 
Stadium. The occasion: the Alumni Spring Reunion. 



University of Maryland 

Composite 1964 Spring Sports Schedule 



March 



BASEBALL 

Coach Jack Jackson 



April 



20 
21 

24 

25 

27 

28 
30 

31 

1 

2 

3 

4 
6 



10 

11 

13 

14 

17 

18 

20 

21 

24 

25 
27 
28 
29 



May 



12 
13 
14 
16 



South Carolina 

South Carolina 
Clemson 

Clemson 



• Syracuse, 2:30 p.m. 



• Yale, 2:30 p.m. 

• West Virginia, 2:30 p.m. 

Virginia 

• George Washington, 
2:30 p.m. 



LACROSSE 

Coach Al Ueagy 

• Wesleyan, 3:00 p.m. 



• Princeton, 
2:30 p.m. 



• M.I.T., 3:00 p.m. 

• Brown, 3:00 p.m. 

• New Hampshire, 
3:00 p.m. 



TENNIS 



GOLF 



TRACK 



• Duke, 2:30 p.m. 

• Wake Forest, 2:30 p.m. 

Georgetown 

• North Carolina, 
2:30 p.m. 

• N.C. State, 1:00 p.m. 

• Georgetown, 2:30 p.m. 



North Carolina 
N. C. State 



Wake Forest 
Duke 

Navy 

• Virginia, 2:30 p.m. 
Penn State (2) 



• Baltimore U. 

3:00 p.m. 



Penn State 



Virginia 

North Carolina, 
3:00 p.m. 



Navy, 2:30 p.m. 



Army 
• Duke, 2:30 p.m. 



• Md. Lacrosse 
Club, 12 Noon 



( oach Doyle Royal < oach I rank * ronin ( oach inn Kehoe 

(I I MMIN 

Sol I H ( \KOLINA 



I m a-, iiii, 2:00 p.m. 



Syracusi . 2:30 p.m. 



Virginia 



N. C. State 
Duke 



Georgetown, 3 p.m. 



• No. Carolina, 
3:00 p.m. 



George Washington. 
3:00 p.m. 



I)\K I \I(>1 I II. 

2:00 p.m. 



Penn Stati 

• Hopkins, 3:00 p.m. 

• Wake Forest, 3:00 p.m. 



ACC Tournament 
(at Durham. N. C. ) 



Mil -Pkini iiiin 

(il DRC.l iown 

Hopkins 



o South Carolina 
1:30 p.m. 



• ( i i mson. 1 :30 p.m. 

I'l nn Si \i I 

• N.C. State. 

1:30 p.m. 

Di Kl 

Nil. ( \K()1 IN \ 

Wvki Fori si 



Sou i ii ( \koi in \ 
Ki i \-.s i at 
Columbia, S. ( I 



• Di ki. 1:00 p.m. 



NllKI II ( \ROI IN \ 



Pi NN Rl I \1S 

(at Philadelphia I 



Navy 



• Navy, 1:00 p.m. 

VIRGIN] \ 

• ACC Moot 
ACC lourna- (at College Park. 
ment (at Md.) 
Columbia, S.< . ) 



N \\i 



Home Game 







Close by if you need her 



Jo matter what the hour — through the day 
the darkness of the night — there's always 
operator as close as your telephone. Just a 
ue turn of the dial and she is there! 
lelping people in emergencies. Working on 



calls that require special attention. Answering 
calls for information. Providing personal, 
individual service in so many, many ways. 

And seeking to do it always in a friendly, 
courteous and competent manner. 




BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 



SERVING YOU 



Maryland Room 

ity f M«ryWnd LJfe«r> 

; |lr.ec P«rk. Md. 

jmni Publication of the University of Maryland 







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Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXVI Number 2 



TVTfiryhxnd 




Tun Cover: This fine campus scene was photographed by Ronald Kreuder, 
a draftsman in the Physical Plant Department. It was taken through a 
window of the Memorial Chapel, south. Harford Hall is in the center; 
Washington Hall is the next building on the right. Of special interest in 
this issue are the text of President llkins' remarks concerning the Uni- 
versity's view oi freedom on the campus, a report on our wonderful 
Maryland Singers on lour, and the color insert, "World of Research' . 
printed by permission of the Editors oi the 1964 terrapin. Our special 
thanks to Advisor Jimmy Bedford, and a superlative photographer, Emory 
Kristof. The excellent photograph opposite, showing the setting sun caught 
in the spire of the Memorial Chapel, was taken by student James Spears. 
In the next issue of The Maryland Magazine, another eight-page coloi 
insert, '"Maryland: her promise to her people" will be published. Have 
a pleasant summer. 



University Dimensions of Freedom 



8 Ca 



ampus Scenes 



10 



The Maryland Singers 



13 



World of Research 



21 



Alumni and Campus Notes 



26 



Montgomery Johns 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 
EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 
B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
RICHARD W. CASE, Assistant Treasurer 
DR. WILLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 
MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
ROBERT J. McCARTNEY, Director 



OFFICE O F FINAN CE AND BU SINESS 
C WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



DR. EDWARD D. STONE, '25, President 

MRS. ERNA R. CHAPMAN, '34, Vice-President 

THE HONORABLE JOSEPH L. CARTER, '25, Vice-President 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

ROBERTSON LEACH 
826 W. 40th Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21211 
Telephone: Belmont 5-8302 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mad 
matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879.-$3.00 per year-Fifty cents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 



. 



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University Dimensions of Freedom 

An Address by President Wilson H. Elkins 
to the Students and Faculty of the University, April 8, 1964 



IN the February 23rd issue of the New York Times 
Magazine, there is a cartoon showing a young man vis- 
iting in the room of a coed at Smith College. It is called 
"Down to Earth" and the caption reads, "When men visit 
girls at Smith, the door must be partly open and all four 
feet on the floor." 

The topic of the article in which the cartoon appears is 
"Chaperones." The purpose is to show how social condi- 
tions have changed in our society, particularly in the col- 
leges and universities. It is, to some extent, symbolic of 
the crusade for "freedom" on the campus. It is not un- 
related to certain developments on this campus during the 
eventful year of 1963-64; notably the mounting current 
of student opinion with reference to the alleged "unfair" 
and "ill-considered" unilateral announcement by the Dean 
of Women that girls would not be allowed to check out 
for weekends unless they intended to go home. As usual. 



the critics were outspoken, and the voices o\' freedom 
(especially the male voices) rose to what must have been 
an alarming crescendo before the embattled Dean oi 
Women. Many o( us looked on and wondered if the 
boys, entrenched behind the Associated Women Students, 
would continue the attack. 

Perhaps the Dean was saved by the chaplain's bell. The 
discussion of women's rights was pushed off the front 
page of the Diamondback by another issue with rising 
overtones of freedom. Ironically, the President of the 
University, whose image on fraternity row had not been 
entirely favorable, was established as a defender o\' fra- 
ternity shenanigans. Newspapers suggested and editori- 
alized that taps had been blown on campus freedom. This 
accusation was made notwithstanding the appearance on 
the campus of Mrs. Murray, the admitted atheist, whose 
remarks should have laid to final rest am contention 



March-April, J 964 




We are learning so much that society is becoming very 
complex. The individual is having a hard time reconcil- 
ing his inalienable rights with governmental and institu- 
tional regulations. As the individual experiences the j 
alarming developments toward collectivism in our social | 
order, he becomes more conscious of human rights — of | 
the fundamental freedoms. Individualism emerges in 
many and strange ways to offset the movement toward 
uniformity. Some indulge in philosophical discussions of 
man's role in the universe; others grow beards and tailor 
them to their personalities. There is a genuine concern 
even among the vast majority that the individual's free- 
dom of choice and action may be subordinated to mass 
conformity. Some of this concern is reflected on the Uni- 
versity campus as a symptom of the period of develop- 
ment in which we are now engaged. 

The University of Maryland is experiencing the 
changes which occur and the attitudes that prevail in a 
large and growing institution. The student body is grow- 
ing more rapidly than that of most universities. Size is 
important because it indicates that more individuals are 
involved in the learning process, but there is constant 
fear of developing just a large quantity of mediocrity. 
The mission of the University is to provide each individ- 
ual the opportunity to develop his capacity to the fullest 
extent; to prepare not only for a job, but to live usefully 
in a free society and contribute to its advancement. The 
attainment of this aim demands a high student commit- 
ment, a competent and devoted faculty and staff, and 
facilities to accommodate the modern requirements of 
an educational institution. 



that dissenters were excluded. Looking back at it, per- 
haps her appearance was the event that aroused so much 
interest in the question of spiritual relationships at Mary- 
land. 

There were other developments which also demanded 
the attention of the press and, again, the individual and 
his rights — even his pleasure — was involved. The long 
dreaded report of the special committee to study the ef- 
fects of tobacco came as no surprise. Like so many re- 
ports, it could have been written before the committee 
was appointed. While no surprise, it was disconcerting 
to a number of people; and, individuals who defied the 
evidence were self-conscious as they approached, almost 
surreptitiously, the tobacco counter and asked for ciga- 
rettes in a faint whisper. Some wondered what would 
happen to the tobacco industry. What would southern 
Marylanders do who recently had lost the legislative bat- 
tle for the slot machine? Perhaps they and those of us 
with bad habits and little will power may take some com- 
fort from the following lines of doggerel poetry which I 
discovered soon after the report on "Smoking and 
Health" was issued. 

He was a very cautious man, 
Who never romped or played. 
He never smoked, he never drank, 
And never kissed a maid. 

But when he up and passed away, 
Insurance was denied. 
For since he hadn't ever lived, 
They claimed he never died. 



THERE IS SOME SATISFACTION TO BE GAINED FROM 
looking back on the developments of the past decade. 
I should hope that an objective appraisal would show 
progress in the areas of student qualifications and com- 
mitment to learning, faculty improvement, and physical 
plant and equipment for teaching and research. It has 
been a decade of high promise for the University and 
for its graduates. As I see it, the University is now in the 
somewhat uncomfortable position of the upper middle 
class striving to get into the company of the nation's 
aristocrats in higher learning. There are discernible 
rumblings which characterize all organizations sharply 
perceiving their potentialities and striving to attain 
them. The geographical location and the relative wealth 
of the State of Maryland provide important advantages, 
but the real test lies in the will of the State to attract and 
retain a faculty and staff of the highest quality. The 
decade ahead will be a decisive one for the University. 

Whatever the verdict may be on past achievement, we 
must turn our attention to the present and the future. The 
demands are and will be tremendous, even a little dis- 
turbing. Fortunately, the Board of Regents, the admin- 
istration, and the faculty have been aware of the enroll- 
ment trends in higher education as they relate to the Uni- 
versity. Although enrollment has surpassed expectations, 
preparation has kept apace with developments. Gen- 
erally, faculty and staff positions have increased in pro- 
portion to the growth of the student body. Buildings are 
now under construction on this campus which, with 
equipment, will cost approximately $10,000,000. Devel- 
opment of the Baltimore campus is progressing toward 
construction of major units for law, medicine and den- 
tistry and the improvement of facilities for nursing, 
pharmacy, and social work. 



the Maryland Magazine 



The General Assembly of 1964 responded favorably to 
the University. The Governor's recommendations were 
approved with only minor changes. The operating budget 
was increased by approximately $4,780,000 with a large 
part of the increase allocated for faculty salaries and new 
positions. (I hasten to add that determining the individ- 
ual increases is not likely to require excessive use of our 
Computer Science Center.) A Graduate School of Li- 
brary Science was approved and is scheduled to open in 
the fall of 1965. The total operating budget, including 
self-supporting activities, will exceed $60,000,000 in the 
coming fiscal year. This includes dormitory and dining 
hall accommodations and the far-flung operations of 
University College which, incidentally, is building a new 
home at the end of Campus Drive. 

Appropriations for capital improvements far exceed 
those made for any past year, totalling $11,177,300. 
Major additions are a new hospital facility in Baltimore, 
another addition to the Physics Building, a new dormi- 
tory, and the first two buildings of a brand new campus 
to be called, I hope, UMBC — University of Maryland in 
Baltimore County. It is scheduled to open in September, 
1966. 

With respect to branches, the University has been giv- 
ing top priority to the Baltimore County site. In the be- 
ginning, selected courses will be offered in the Arts 
and Sciences, Business and Public Administration, Edu- 
cation, and the pre-professional programs. Graduate 
study will develop in accordance with demand and avail- 
able resources. While it is dangerous to prophesy, I 
think that it is reasonable to predict that some day the 
Baltimore County Branch will rival the College Park 
campus. That will come about long after my administra- 
tion and after the echoes of current critics have died 
away. Other branches are being considered by the Board 
of Regents in accordance with legislative action, but the 
University is not rushing pell-mell toward expansion. 



I he purpose ol additional facilities is to provid< 
education for more people al less expense to the indi- 
vidual. I he branch in the Baltimore metropolitan a 
will, we believe, reduce admissions to tins campus and 
therebj stabilize enrollment here at around 25,000 With 
the growth and expansion ol the junioi colleges and 
colleges, the University will devote increasing attention 
to upper division undergraduate work and to the gradu- 
ate program. We sh;ill mOVC deliberately, however . ill 

raising admission requirements foi freshmen who seek 
admission to the University, since this should noi 
done until there are other well developed public highei 

educational institutions throughout the Stale. 

Most of you will be paying the bill foi the expansion 
and improvement of higher education in the State rh< 

bill will be high if the job is done properly. I he I niver- 
sity cannot afford to spread without depth, foi a second 
class education is a luxurs which neither individuals DOI 
states can afford. The University, therefore, will require 
adequate financial support as it expands. Students will 
be asked to pay a proportionate share as operating costs 
rise; parents should expect to assume the obligation ol 
sharing reasonably in the expense of educating their 
sons and daughters. The government should not be ex- 
pected to bear the total cost. This is the rationale foi 
modest fee increases to the student. It accounts for the 
decision to raise tuition for the undergraduate next year 
in the amount of $40., and the fee lor graduate courses 
by $3. per credit hour. Despite these increases, the 
percentage paid by the State toward the education of each 
student will remain about the same as in the past. 

At this point, I can hear echoes from some of the boost- 
ers of athletics at Maryland. "If the University is expand- 
ing so remarkably and requiring so much money," the) 
ask, "why doesn't it win more football and basketball 
games?" Perhaps 1 should say that size and athletic- 
prowess do not go together, or would it be safer for me 






to focus attention on our great successes in soccer, track, 
swimming, golf, wrestling and lacrosse? It might be 
even more rewarding to claim that the University has 
turned to a new sport — tray sledding — which one sports 
writer has acclaimed the greatest invention since Dr. 
Naismith threw a soccer ball through a basket. Let us 
hope that injuries, academic attrition, and a future scar- 
city of dining hall equipment do not reduce the ranks of 
our varsitj tray sledders next year. At any rate, we 
should cherish originality along with performance as we 
strive for excellence on the playing fields as well as in 
the classrooms. 

HAVING GIVEN YOU A PEEK INTO THE OPERATIONS 
and plans of the University. I return to the central 
theme of my remarks. To fulfill the mission of the 
University, objectives must be clear and the environ- 
ment must be supportive and favorable. The main pur- 
pose of helping students as individuals to develop their 
capacities and to improve the society in which we all 
live is accomplished through learning, research, intel- 
lectual inquiry, constructive criticism and a variety of 
activities designed to nourish individual growth. The 
best climate is one which is orderly and which, at the 
same time, allows for freedom of individual expression. 

In a large and growing institution, there is always a 
danger that individualism will be stifled by regulations 
and impersonal relationships. The use of electronic 
machines for administrative tabulations and other me- 
chanical aids for teaching may tend to create a feeling 
that the individual is just another number. Mechaniza- 
tion need not have this effect. Actually, the welfare 
of the individual is enhanced by mechanization if it en- 
ables the University to compile more information about 
the individual student — and if this information is used 
intelligently. Faculty-student relationships remain the 
heart of the learning process. Although there are many 
large classes and there may be too many time-saving 
tests, effective teaching is a prime consideration of the 
faculty and will be given increasing attention. Our re- 
sponsibility is to use the vast resources of the University 
in such a manner that the individual will not become 
just a pattern of holes punched into an IBM card. Mary 
Jones must be identified as Mary Jones and not just 
number 87449. 

In order to accomplish this aim, the student should be 
expected to perform with greater independence as he 
proceeds through college. There should be a gradual 
conditioning of every student of this expectation. More 
frequent use of the library is an important means of 
progress toward independent learning. The resources 
of the library have been improved and will receive addi- 
tional support. More students are using the libraries; 
but, at the undergraduate level, only a small percentage 
are now taking optimum advantage of the resources 
available. As all of the students are expected to do more 
independent work, a relatively small group of academically 
superior students will be encouraged to enroll in the 
honors programs. The University has an obligation to 
expand and enrich these programs as rapidly as practi- 
cable, and the development of our human resources de- 
mands that eligible candidates enroll in them. 

Recently, the faculty and the Board of Regents re- 
sponded to student agitation for more freedom in class 
attendance. In general, compulsory attendance is no 
longer required, except in freshmen courses. If you find 
lectures unrewarding and can perform satisfactorily 



without much exposure to the instructor, you will not be 
dismissed from the University. A strong word of warn- 
ing, however, is in order. Use your freedom wisely and 
remember that the instructor determines how you are 
graded. It is hoped that the change in the attendance 
regulation will produce better teaching and a better 
student attitude — and it could result in a higher attend- 
ance record on a voluntary basis. 

There is a lot of talk these days about individual rights 
and freedom, and considerable confusion about the lat- 
ter. Certainly, a university cannot fulfill its mission ex- 
cept in an atmosphere of freedom. The fundamental 
freedoms, however, are sometimes confused with a 
simple desire to eliminate university regulations. This, 
of course, would mean anarchy. In the areas of discus- 
sion and inquiry, students enjoy the same freedom as the 
faculty. In the government of the University, students 
are necessarily subordinated to the faculty and the ad- 
ministration who, in the final analysis, have the respon- 
sibility for the well-being and on-going vitality of the 
University. The degree of participation by students in 
the affairs of the University is determined by the maturity 
of the student body, and by the ability of individual 
students to discharge challenging assignments creditably. 

Academic freedom is a term applied directly to the 
faculty and only indirectly to students. It is the keystone 
in the structure and function of a university. It assumes 
that members of the faculty are competent in their 
special fields, and that they are qualified to pursue the 
truth whatever the effects may be. The right to search 
for the truth, whether in discussion with students or in 
examining related materials, is essential to the public 
welfare. It is necessary in order to protect the members 
of the faculty from those who would stifle free discussion 
for the benefit of special interests or to safeguard a par- 
ticular point of view. But the freedom of the teacher 
and the scholar to probe and to disturb the status quo 
imposes a heavy responsibility on the University and 
the teacher. The University endorses the capability and 
integrity of its members. The individual has the respon- 
sibility for reasonable accuracy, good taste, and fairness. 
The American Association of Universities states the 
following: 



HIS (THE FACULTY MEMBER'S) EFFEC- 
TIVENESS, BOTH AS A SCHOLAR AND 
TEACHER IS NOT REDUCED BUT ENHANCED 
IF HE HAS THE HUMILITY AND THE WIS- 
DOM TO RECOGNIZE THE FALLIBILITY OF 
HIS OWN JUDGMENT. HE SHOULD RE- 
MEMBER THAT HE IS AS MUCH A LAYMAN 
AS ANYONE ELSE IN ALL FIELDS EXCEPT 
THOSE IN WHICH HE HAS SPECIAL COM- 
PETENCE. OTHERS, BOTH WITHIN AND 
WITHOUT THE UNIVERSITY, ARE AS FREE 
TO CRITICIZE HIS OPINIONS AS HE IS FREE 
TO EXPRESS THEM. 



Academic freedom must be earned by years of prepara- 
tion for the teaching profession. The responsible indivi- 
dual who cherishes freedom in the University will not 
abuse it or use it as a cloak for irresponsible action. To 
my knowledge, academic freedom has never been violated 
at the University of Maryland. 



the Maryland Magazine 




WHILE STUDENTS ENJOY BROAD FREEDOM OF SPEECH 
and should be encouraged to question and express 
differing opinions, they must earn their right to self- 
government. Of different ages, they function in dif- 
fering stages of development. Above all, they cannot be 
held responsible for the continuum of University wel- 
fare. Final authority in such important matters as 
publications, the recognition of student organizations, 
the method of grading, and the policy concerning speak- 
ers on the campus must reside in those who have been 
charged with responsibility. Although conditions should 
enrourage student growth toward responsible citizenship, 
the faculty and administration must accept the conse- 
quences of the conditions that are established. 

All this does not imply that students should be treated 
as first graders. Opportunity for learning should be 
provided in accordance with maturity, time, judgment, 
ability and willingness to participate in the creation of a 
favorable academic climate. It should be recognized that 
mistakes will occur and that mistakes, if accompanied 
by counsel, are a part of the learning process. The policy 
of the University is to allow a wide latitude of action, but 



not to condone license to do as one pleases under the 
guise of freedom. I icense is the mortal enemy 
dom, Editors and reporters of publications cted 

to perform with due regard foi accuracy, fairness and 
good tasie. 11k- University's policj concerning speakers 
united to the eanipus by student organizations i^ 
erallv non-restrictive, except foi individuals advocating 
the overthrow of the government by force. Neverthcl 
there are myriads ol mediocre speakers available whose 
contribution to our intellectual life would be negligible 
and it can be hoped that student groups would exercise 
common sense in issuing imitations so that the intellec- 
tual climate of the University ma) be enriched 

There is much more talk today about freedom than 
there is attention to its corollary -responsibility. I his is 
because the exercise of responsibility is much more de 
manding than the exercise of freedom. I he professoi 
qualifies for academic freedom only after long sears ol 
professional preparation. Freedom of the press is sale- 
guarded by experienced editors and publishers who, in 
order to survive, must have the judgment to distinguish 
between libel and legitimate criticism. Living democ- 
racy does not activate from the ink and paper of a con- 
stitution; it emerges from an informed public which has 
demonstrated the capacity to govern itself. In a univer- 
sity, conditions are established for the development ol 
responsible individuals, and the process is a gradual one 
which requires teaching, counselling and supervision. The 
Student Government Association and other activities and 
organizations on campus are training grounds for the 
proper exercise of rights and privileges which must be 
earned by an acceptable standard of performance. The 
senior, for example, is usually much better qualified to 
accept responsibility than the freshman. Hence, there 
is more justification for a greater degree of freedom and 
independent conduct by the senior. Often, however, a 
clear distinction is difficult in the conduct of student af- 
fairs; but every reasonable effort should be made to 
free the student as he becomes a more responsible per- 
son. 

Whatever problems there may be in the area of student 
activity and emancipation from authority, the University 
is committed above all to the education of the individual. 
The University is a place where the intellect grows by 
the acquisition of knowledge and through a multitude of 
human relationships. Students, faculty and staff together 
are members of the most complex organization in our 
society, one which demands a prescribed performance 
and which, at the same time, is expected to provide op- 
portunity for creative expression. It can do this best if it 
is free to pursue the truth by testing the validity of each 
idea, and if each member cherishes responsibility equally 
with freedom. Individualism, freedom and responsibility 
are woven firmly together. A major test oi the Univer- 
sity is how well it succeeds in developing balance and 
proportion between these interrelated — sometimes clash- 
ing — qualities. 

The task is difficult; the episodes frequently controver- 
sial. The entire process is fraught with explosive and 
rebellious elements. It sometimes pits administration 
against faculty, or faculty against students; sometimes 
both against all authority. It is. in short, the lively 
drama of the individual in transition, and the result, 
though imperfect, is well worth the controversy and 
strife. The final achievement is the University's noblest 
objective: an individual who is mature, responsible and 
free. 



March-April, 1964 



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CAMPUS 

SCENES 

drawn by artist 

Howard Behrens 

for the 1964 

Commencement Program 



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the Maryland Magazine 







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March-April, 1964 



THE 

MARYLAND 

SINGERS 




Their Discipline and Vivacity Captivate Mideastern Audiences\ 




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MARYLAND UNIVERSITY 




SUITCASES BULGING WITH SOUVE- 
nirs and mementos, the Maryland 
Singers and their Director, Miss Rose 
Marie Grentzer of the Music Depart- 
ment, will depart for the United States 
from Dublin, Ireland on May 25, thus 
ending a three-and-a-half month con- 
cert tour of 12 countries in the Middle 
East, Great Britain and Ireland, spon- 
sored by the Cultural Presentations 
Program of the Department of State. 

Reports to the State Department 
from various posts and newspapers in 
the Middle East have been over- 
whelmingly complimentary of the 
group — both as to their performances 
and their deportment. 

The Embassy in Athens, Greece 
said: 

Although the musical impression 
created everywhere by the Singers 
has been excellent, the impact which 
the Singers themselves made on the 
Greek public is even more remark- 
able. The Post has rarely seen in 
Greece university students from any 
country who have conducted them- 
selves with such unfailing courtesy, 
intelligence, and good taste as have 
these young Americans. From the 
standpoint of public relations as well 
as their contribution to mutual un- 
derstanding between the two coun- 
tries, their mission to Greece must be 
considered as having fulfilled the 
high hopes of the Post as well as 
the cultural objectives of the Depart- 
ment. 



Another report from Athens stated: 
The Maryland Singers are now in 
their second and final week of con- 
certs in Greece. Everywhere they 
have sung to capacity houses and the 
enthusiasm of audiences has been 
tumultuous. The Singers, and their 
dynamic Director, Miss Grentzer, 
have been overwhelmed with atten- 
tion and appreciation in the form of 
receptions, sightseeing tours, flowers, 
plaques, photographs and gifts. 

A later report from the Embassy in 
Jordan said, in part: 



Parents and students were the 
leaders of a warmly enthusiastic re- 
ception given the Maryland Singers 
at the Friends Boys School in Ranial- 
lah, Jordan. The discipline and 
vivacity of the IK young singers 
captivated this audience. . . 

Greek and Turkish newspapers 

commented in this way: 

Lesviskos Kyrix, Mytilcne, Greece: 

. . . The concert was y i s c n at 9:30 

a.m. to a full house at the Arion 

Hall and was honored by the \litro- 

politis of Mytilene. the Nomarch 




Mr. Lygerakis and all local digni- 
taries. The program included works 
b\ distinguished American composers 
which were performed with great 
artistry and perfection. It was indeed 
a great joy for all music lovers of 
Mytilene. The Maryland Singers 
presented a beautiful sight in their 
Kuh Century costumes. 

Kiry.x, Chania. Greece: 

A crowd of enthusiastic people 
applauded the Maryland Singers at 
the Olympia Hall the day before 
yesterday. The Maryland Singers, 
founded in 1958, presented a very 
difficult program in a truly perfect 
way. These young boy and girl stu- 
dents sang with coordination, depth, 
passion and knowledge of music. We 
greatly enjoyed this artistic contribu- 
tion by our friend, the U.S.A., 
through this worthy example of the 
artistic life of America. 

Yeni Asir, Izmir's (Turkey) largest 

daily newspaper: 

The program presented by the 
Singers was diversified and colorful. 
They made us live the atmosphere of 
the 18th century through their soft 
and sweet voices. We thank those 
who made the concerts available in 
Izmir. 

Although the schedule of the group 
has been demanding and they have 
travelled from country to country via 
plane, train, bus and truck, written 
reports from the Singers have gen- 
erally expressed great enthusiasm 
over what they have seen and done, 
and gratefulness for the opportunity 
to travel. Lack of sleep seemed 
to be their major complaint, along 
with "a garlic-flavored shiskabob for 
the 15th time in three weeks!" Tele- 
vision, American prices and exams 
were most often listed as "least 
missed" items. 

To date, the "best purchases" of 
the group included a Bible from Jeru- 
salem, topaz earrings and ring, 
smoked silver jewelry, eight meer- 



schaum pipes from Istanbul, a stain- 
less steel sword, and a Nativity scene 
of olive wood from the Holy Land. 

The Singers seemed most impressed 
with the Parthenon, the pyramids, and 
the peace and solitude of the desert. 
They listed as "a most pleasant ex- 
perience," horseback riding on the 
desert in Egypt with the pyramids in 
the background, and the incident 
when the bus got stuck in the mud on 
the Island of Lesbos. "Within sec- 
onds, the whole village crowded 
around us," wrote one member of the 
group. "We sang for them and they 
in turn sang their folk songs and 
taught us their folk dances. They 
brought us oranges and candy and 
mountain flowers." 

The Singers, on the whole, were 
disturbed by the fact that other coun- 
tries think that all Americans are 
wealthy and, as a result, are constant- 
ly trying to sell something to the 
"rich Americans"; also, that teenagers 
abroad think that the only thing 
American teenagers can do is 
"Twist." "These same people were 
surprised to hear us sing serious 
music," said one Singer, "and they 
liked it!" 

Among the "most unforgettable 
persons met so far" by the Singers 
was an elderly lady who had taught 
Lawrence of Arabia to speak Arabic; 
the champion pyramid climber in 
Egypt who could climb the largest 
pyramid (up and down) in just seven 
minutes; and actor Anthony Quinn's 
secretary, who was "very British, very 
charming, and a real world traveler." 

Luncn in a Bedouin tent in the 
desert in Bagdad, seated on Persian 
rugs and pillows, rated high as a "best 
meal" by the Singers. It consisted of 
rice, lamb-kabob, boiled eggs, bak- 
lana, Arab bread and varieties of 
spiced fruits and olives, and ended 
with the "smoking of water pipes." 
A Chinese meal at the "only Chinese 



restaurant in Beirut" was also a 
favorite. 

Customs of the Middle Eastern 
countries intrigued the members of 
the group. Among their written com- 
ments: 

Some women wear jewelry on their 
noses. 

In Greece you wave to people 
with the back of your hand facing 
them; if you wave our way, you put 
a curse on them. 

When Greek audiences give per- 
formers top honors, they 'boo' them. 
In Greece, one celebrates name 
days instead of birthdays. 

A standard reply to 'thank you' is 
'please'. 

Males completely dominate the 
society. 

A Greek custom of giving a guest 
anything he strongly admires resulted 
in my being given a baby chick while 
we were visiting the American Farm 
School in Thessolonike. 
The Maryland Singers were unani- 
mous in reporting that they felt they 
were accomplishing their mission. 
This was being done, they wrote by: 
Informal and spontaneous meet- 
ings with the people. 

Meeting the backbone and future 
leaders of countries — the college 
students. 

Introducing Middle Eastern stu- 
dents to typical U.S. students and 
American folk and contemporary 
music. 

Exchanging culture and custom as 
an earnest and interested friend. 

Meeting students, talking and eat- 
ing with them — discussing things of 
common interest, such as home life, 
hobbies and interests, as well as dif- 
ferences. 
Evidently, the Singers have not had 
the time to get lonesome, since they 
have been too busy seeing, doing, and 
learning. Two of them wrote that, 
next to their next-of-kin, they missed 
most their "constant companion," 
one his "little bug (Volkswagen)" 
and the other, his dog. 



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World of Research 





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Progress in Science 

Maryland realizes the importance 

of the physical sciences 

and is developing facilities 

to complement their growth. 

A new Computer Science Center 

solves lengthy problems; 

wind tunnels teach 

the principles of air flow; 

and algae is tested 

as a source of food 

and' oxygen in outer space. 







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An Atomic Age Lab 



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^4 nuclear reactor is an object of quiet strength. Its only outward 
appearance of being in operation is a soft blue glow: inside, 
it is harnessing the fires of Hell for the benefit of mankind. 
To further the understanding of nuclear theory, the reactor serves 
as the central radiation facility to be utilized by graduate 
students from many countries in their research theses and projects. 





Do-It-Yourself Tools 

Much of the apparatus used for research 

is built and maintained on the campus. 

Engineers have constructed a wind tunnel; 

chemists become glass blowers; 

and the Physics Department has 

its own machine shop and technicians. 





Today's Challenge 

Extensive research is being done 

to better our world. 

From the lowly rat 

making his contribution 

in psychology 

to the student engaged 

in the study of audio dynamics, 

Maryland has joined 

in the crusade 

for scientific development. 

Photographed by Emory Kris; 



Lithographed by 

H. G. Roebuck & Son 

Baltimore 18, MaryllJ 






MAY 

1 3 AFROTC Day 

1 3 Tennis, Navy, Away 

14 Baseball, Virginia, Home 
16 Baseball, Penn State, Away 
16 Golf, Navy, Away 

16 Lacrosse, Hopkins, Away 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

28 Pre-Examination Study Day 
29-June 5 Spring Semester Examina- 
tions 
3 1 Baccalaureate Exercises 



JUNE 

6 Commencement Exercises 



15-19 Rural Women's Short ( ourse 

22 Summer Session Registration 

23 Summer Session Begins 



AUGUST 

3-7 4-H Club Week 

14 Summer Session I ikIs 



New Advances in Steroid 
Chemistry Announced 

A broad new attack on infectious 
disease was announced at the annual 
meeting of the American Chemical 
Society by Dr. Norman J. Doorenbos, 
Professor of Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
at the University of Maryland School of 
Pharmacy. 

Dr. Doorenbos, who has been syn- 
thesizing chemical compounds called 
steroids for the past seven years, has 
come up with a new kind of steroid that 
kills a whole range of infectious micro- 
organisms — not only bacteria but cer- 
tain kinds of fungi that cause disease 
defying all treatment thus far. 

Steroids are a group of compounds 
that include naturally occurring hor- 
mones, such as cortisone. Today many 
steroids are being synthesized in the 
laboratory and manipulated in various 
ways to change their chemical and phys- 
ical character as well as their effects 
within the body. 

Dr. Doorenbos, who presided at the 
ACS symposium in Philadelphia on 
heterocyclic steroids, reported work 
done in collaboration with 14 graduate 
and post-doctoral students in his labora- 
tory. This group found that substituting 
a nitrogen atom for one of the carbon 
atoms in the molecular skeleton of cer- 



tain steroids led to the wholly unex- 
pected result of producing a hormone- 
like compound capable of killing micro- 
organisms. 

Dr. Donald E. Shay, who heads the 
Department of Microbiology in the 
Schools of Pharmacy and Dentistry at 
the University of Maryland, and one ol 
his students, Rodney Smith, conducted 
experiments that established the lethal 
effects of these nitrogen-containing 
steroids (called azasteroids) on fungi — 
molds and yeasts, for example — and a 
group of bacteria that includes the 
troublesome "staph" and "strep" respon- 
sible for so many different infections. 

At the same time. Dr. Herbert Gold- 
berg, at the University of Missouri, was 
testing the effect of azasteroids on pneu- 
mococcus, which besides causing pneu- 
monia may also be responsible for 
meningitis, empyema, and pericarditis. 
He found that, even diluted a million 
times, the azasteroids stopped growth of 
pneumococcus in culture medium. 

Dr. Doorenbos also reported that 
azasteroids reduce inflammation, as 
cortisone and hydrocortisone do. 

He hopes that the discovery will lead 
to new steroid drugs that can be safel) 
used in treating many fungus infections 
as well as bacterial infections resistant 
to other treatment. 

The students who participated with 
Dr. Doorenbos in the work reported are 



Dr. Juanito Abcede. Paul Bossle, Sister 
Jane Marie Brown. Charles (anion. 
Robert Havranek. Chien Li Huang, 
Kenneth Kerridge. Charles Kumkumian. 
Dr. Leon Milewich. Masako Nakagawa, 
Vithalbhai Patel. Kenneth Scott. Arvin 
Shroff, Richard I amorria. Frank Tin- 
ney. and Mu Tsu Wu. 

Dr. Doorenbos has also been invited 
to discuss his work at a number ol other 
pharmacy schools participating in the 
\isiting scientist program conducted b) 
the American Association of Colleges ot 
Pharmacy with the aid of a grant from 
the National Science Foundation. 

The investigation was supported b) a 
research grant from the U. S. Public 
Health Service and by gifts ol steroid- 
starting materials from the Cancer 
Chemotherapy National Service (enter. 



Nurses' Alumni Publications 

The University o\ Maryland Nurses' 
Alumnae Association is presently com- 
piling a directory of all graduates from 
the University of Maryland School ol 
Nursing. It is scheduled to be published 
in the Fall o\ l l )64. Alumni who have 
recently married or moved, please notify 
Mrs. Bessie Pee Arnurius. l >3(> Dulanex 
Valley Road. Towson 4. Maryland. 

The Bulletin, the annual official publi- 
cation of the Universit) oi Maryland 



March-April, 1964 



21 



Nurses' Alumnae Association will fea- 
ture the 75th anniversary of our Alma 
Mater. Should you be interested in this 
special publication, forward two dollars 
per copy to Mrs. Shirley G. Bernstein, 
1005 Flagtree Lane, Pikesville 8. Mary- 
land. Please make all checks payable to 
the University of Maryland Nurses' 
Alumnae Association. 



Symposia Papers Published 

rwo volumes of the University of 
Maryland Symposia in Government and 
Politics were published in April by the 
Van Nostrand Company. The volumes 
represent a collection of papers pre- 
sented at symposia held in 1961 and 
1962 at the University under the spon- 
sorship of the Department of Govern- 
ment and Politics. 

The Role of Theory in International 
Relations, which contains the papers 
presented at the symposium held in 
1961, was edited by Dr. Horace V. 
Harrison, Professor and Director of 
Graduate Studies in the Department of 
Government and Politics. The essays 
are directed to a consideration of how 
to proceed with the task of building a 
coherent body of theory in international 
relations. 

Contributors to this volume include 
Professor Harrison; Professor Quincy 
Wright, University of Virginia; Ken- 
neth W. Thompson, Director of the 
Social Sciences Division of the Rocke- 
feller Foundation; Professor William 
T. R. Fox, Director of the Institute of 
War and Peace Studies, Columbia Uni- 
versity; and Professor Hans J. Morgan- 
theau. Director of the Center for the 
Study of American Foreign and Mili- 
tary Policy, University of Chicago. 

Systems of Integrating the Interna- 
tional Community, which contains the 
papers presented at the symposium held 
in December, 1962, was edited by Pro- 
fessor Elmer Plischke, Head of the 
Department of Government and Poli- 
tics. The papers in this volume analyze 
the various systems of international 
integration — confederal supranational, 
federal, and communist inter-party 
coalescement. 

Contributors to the second volume 
include Professor Plischke; Dr. Francis 
Wilcox, Dean of the School of Ad- 
vanced International Studies, The Johns 
Hopkins University; Professor Arnold 
Zurchcr, Co-ordinator of the Depart- 
ment of Government and International 
Areas Studies Program, New York 
University; Dr. Carl J. J. Friedrich, 
Eaton Professor of the Science of Gov- 
ernment, Harvard University; and Dr. 
W. W. Kulski, Professor of Interna- 
tional Relations at Syracuse University. 

The symposia of which these volumes 
are a product constitute the continua- 
tion of a series of some half dozen 
occasional "Lectures in Public Affairs," 



commencing in 1956 and held under 
the co-operative sponsorship of the 
Bureau of Governmental Research and 
the Department of Government and 
Politics of the University of Maryland. 



Baltimore Club Meets 

The University of Maryland Alumni 
Club of Greater Baltimore, Mr. Arthur 
G. Van Reuth, President, held its sec- 
ond meeting of the season on March 
13th in the Baltimore Student Union. 
The "Continuing-Education Program" is 
an annual event highlighted by a speak- 
er from the College Park campus. 

International scholar and author, Dr. 
William T. Avery, Professor and Head 
of Classical Languages and Literature 
Department, College Park, was the 
speaker of the evening. His topic, 
"Echoes from Olympus", was so infor- 
mative and stimulating that requests 
were made for its publication. 

The group was also privileged to hear 
a brief report of the University's 
progress from President Wilson H. 
Elkins. 

Preceding the program, a buffet sup- 
per was served in the main dining hall 
of the Union. 

Chairman of Arrangements, Dr. Ed- 
ward D. Stone, Jr., was assisted by the 
following Committee: Mrs. W. G. Mc- 
Kenney, Miss Beatrice Marriott, Mr. J. 
Lloyd Shaffer, Jr., Mr. James O. Proc- 
tor, Mr. H. Russell Knust, Mr. Ernest 
Trimble, Dr. Frank J. Slama, Mrs. Em- 
ma E. Hipp, Mrs. Arthur I. Bell, and 
Miss Beatrice Y. Jarrett. Dr. William 
H. Triplett, Secretary-Treasurer, served 
as Reservations Chairman. 

The Baltimore Alumni Club custom- 
arily holds four meetings a year. The 
first, an Oyster Roast, was held in Janu- 
ary at the Baltimore Engineers' Club 
with capacity attendance. The remain- 
ing two, which will round out the year, 
are the Annual Meeting and Election 
of Officers on Thursday, May 21st, and 
the Picnic-Crab Feast on Saturday, July 
11th. All Alumni residing in the 
Greater Baltimore area are cordially 
invited to join the Club. 



The 

Washington Wholesale 
Drug Exchange, Inc. 

Retail Druggist 

Owned Wholesale 
Drug House 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 




"And let's talk about 
your future'* 

Most engineers want the same things: good 
pay, stability and, if you're the kind of fellow 
we like to talk to, you want assignments that 
stir your mind. 

GOOD PAY. Where do you stand in the 
educational and experience tables? You'll 
earn accordingly. 

STABILITY. For 77 years Westinghouse 
has been a leader in the scientific field, and 
our far-flung projects have attracted many 
outstanding scientists and engineers. 

STIMULATING ASSIGNMENTS. At 

Westinghouse you'll find research and devel- 
opment projects in molecular electronics, bi- 
onics, optical physics, Pulse Doppler Radar, 
LASER, advanced weapons systems and 
other challenging fields. 

Pull up a chair . . . and let's have a heart 
to heart talk about your future. 

To arrange an interview call SOuthfield 
1-1000, Ext. 657 or send resume to: 

Mr. L. W. Henderson 
DEPT. 404 



Westinghouse 



DEFENSE CENTER 
BALTIMORE 

P. 0. Box 1693, 

Baltimore 3, Md. 

Air Arm Ordnance 

Electronics Systems 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 




W 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



Some Recent Grants 
to the University 

|1 For theoretical and experimental deter- 
i 
mination of potential curves. 

U.S. Army to Institute of Molecu- 
lar Physics 
| $30,300.17. 

For study of physiological factors in- 
fluencing voluntary food intake of 
chicks as they affect growth, which may 
have human applications. 
I 1 National Institutes of Health to 

i Department of Poultry 
$102,000. 

i * 

: i To finance a workshop on human rela- 
tionships in educational administration 
during the 1964 Summer Session. 

I] Danforth Foundation to College 

: of Education 

J $2,770. 
* 

; To continue study on the role of allergy 

' in certain skin diseases. 

! National Institutes of Health to 

School of Medicine 
I $10,765. 

I For support of a summer institute in 
science for secondary school teachers 
of biology. 

! National Science Foundation to 

I Department of Botany 

I $52,000. 
* 

1 For support of research on the metab- 
olism of steroid hormones. 
■ National Institutes of Health to 
i University of Maryland Clinical 
) Study Center 
' $14,917. 

I * 

'■ To provide funds for research on the 

properties of gases and plasmas in high 

speed flow. 
I U. S. Air Force to Institute for 
| Fluid Dynamics and Applied Math- 
j ematics 
i $105,577. 



For support of a program on research 
participation for college teachers. 
National Science Foundation to 
Department of Physics and Astron- 
omy 
$34,500. 

1 * 

i For support of a summer science train- 
ing program for secondary school stu- 
dents. 

\ National Science Foundation to 

! Department of Physics and Astron- 
omy 
$6,750. 

For support of a summer institute in 

mathematics for secondary school 

teachers of mathematics. 

National Science Foundation to 

Department of Mathematics 

$39,000. 



To support studies on physiology ol in- 
sect reproduction, and the morphologj 
and physiology ol inseel blood cells, 
National Institutes oi Health i<> 

Department of En iomoi <>(,<, 
$13,924. 

To provide funds tor an experimental 

investigation of two improved scoop 

configurations. 

U. S. Navy io Di pari mini oi I \ 

GINEER1NG 

$13,379. 

To provide funds for research studies 

on the basic fluid mechanics ol a two 

dimensional jet stream. 

U. S. Army to Institute for Fluid 

Dynamics and Applied Mathematics 

$9,099. 



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Alumni Club Organized 

The University of Maryland School 
of Medicine Alumni Club for the Great- 
er Washington Area was organized in 
September of this year and the first 
meeting was held in October. 

A luncheon meeting was held on No- 
vember 20, in conjunction with the 31st 
Annual Scientific Assembly of the D.C. 
Medical Society. It is planned to make 
this luncheon an annual event at the 
time of the annual meeting of the D.C. 
Medical Society. 

Serving as officers of the Club for 
terms of two years are: Dr. Irving 
Burka, president; Dr. Leo T. Brown, 
vice-president; Dr. Gerald D. Schuster, 
secretary-treasurer; Dr. S. Charles Jones, 
Dr. Benjamin Isaacson, and Dr. James 
T. Estes, members of the Executive 
Committee. 



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Medical Alumni Meet 
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The annual reunion of the University 
of Maryland Medical Alumni Associa- 
tion was held May 7, 8, and 9 in Balti- 
more. 

This year for the first time, the Med- 
ical Alumni Association met concur- 
rently with four groups of physicians 
who received their training at Univer- 
sity Hospital. Each of the specialized 
groups had scheduled scientific sessions. 

Highlight of the Medical Alumni As- 
sociation activities was the presentation 
of the Alumni Honor Award and Gold 
Key to Dr. Hugh R. Spencer, Professor 
Emeritus, who retired as Head of the 
Pathology Department in 1956. 

Dr. Gibson J. Wells, President of the 
Medical Alumni Association, opened 
the business meeting and general assem- 
bly in the Health Sciences Library audi- 
torium. Dr. William S. Stone, Dean 
of the School of Medicine, presented 
official greetings from the school. 

Dr. David L. Dingman, Assistant 
Resident in Surgery at University Hos- 
pital, gave a first-person account of the 
successful American assault on Mt. 
Everest last year. 

The several scientific meetings con- 
vened in the morning and afternoon. 

The University of Maryland Surgical 
Society met in the Health Sciences Li- 
brary auditorium with Dr. Edwin C. 
Daue and Dr. Harry C. Hull serving as 
moderators. Dr. William T. Raby and 
Dr. John Atkins chaired the University 
of Maryland Hospital Medical Asso- 
ciation sessions in Gordon Wilson Hall. 

The Douglass Obstetrical and Gyne- 
cological Society of the University of 
Maryland met in The Psychiatric In- 
stitute. Moderators were Dr. Arthur L. 



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24 



the Maryland Magazine 



Haskins and Dr. Richard S. Munford. 

Dr. J. Edmund Bradley and Dr. A. H. 
Finkclstein presided at the meeting of 
the University of Maryland Pediatric 
Society in the Baltimore Union. 

Reunions of the clas of 1^14 and 
every fifth class thereafter were held 
throughout the three-day period. 

Special recognition of 50-year mem- 
bers of the alumni association was made 
at a banquet at the Lord Baltimore 
Hotel. Dr. Jack C. Norris, Assistant 
Clinical Professor of Pathology at 
Emory University, Atlanta. Georgia, 
presented the principal address. His 
subject was '"The Ideal Physician — His 
Confused State in Today's World." 

Certificates of life membership were 
awarded to the following 50-year grad- 
uates of the medical school: 

University of Maryland — 1914. 
Drs. Charles W. Armstrong, Antonio 
Balart Y Cros, Yates M. Barber, George 
William Bishop, Lowrie W. Blake, 
James C. Brogden, Morton M. Brot- 
man, Arthur Casilli, Everett L. Cook, 
Gilbert L. A. Dailey, Theodore McCann 
Davis, Walter Lee Denny, Chauncey E. 
Dovell, Escheverria y Mora, Richard I. 
Esslinger, George Garland Grazier, 
Cecil Starke Hassell, Aaron L. Holstein, 
Morris B. Levin, Nolan D. C. Lewis, 
John F. Lutz, Charles L. Magruder, 
Albert D. McFadden, Challice Haydon 
Metcalf, Maj. Alfred Mordecai, John 
Charles O'Neill, William F. Rice, Walter 
L. Richards, George Loutrell Timanus, 
William Sebastian Walsh, H. H. Warner, 
David Tressler Williams, Austin H. 
Wood. 

College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons — 1914. Drs. William P. Black. 
O. H. Bobbitt, Manuel G. Carriera, 
Attie Thompson Gordon, N. A. Her- 
nandez, Howard Carrington Heilman, 
Jesse J. Jenkins, Harry Stanley Kuhl- 
man, Herbert Leonard Langer, Augustin 
R. Laugier, Joseph Lipskey, John E. 
Maher, Erwin Mayer, John Vincent Mc- 
Aninch, Lt. Col. Frank M. Moose, 
Manuel E. Pujadaz-Dias, Charles B. 
Rohr, Richard O. Shea, Ivy G. Shirkey. 
Byron William Steele, Frank Gregory 
Strahan, and Thurman Elroy Vass. 

Certificates were awarded posthu- 
mously to physicians who have died 
during their fiftieth anniversary year. 
They include the former Drs. John Rob- 
ert Agnew, Frank John Ayd, Clair 
Crouse Henderson, Merrill F. Hosmer, 
James W. Katzenberger, Abraham Scha- 
piro, and Raymond M. Troxler. 

Dr. Edward F. Cotter was chairman 
of the reunion arrangements committee. 

The 25th reunion of the Class of 
1939 of the School of Medicine was 
held on Saturday, May 9, on the Balti- 
more Campus. 

Raymond M. Cunningham served as 
chairman of the 25th reunion commit- 
tee, assisted by Harry Beck, James Cea- 
nos, Bernard Kleiman, Dexter Reiman 
and Ramsay Thomas. 




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25 



MONTGOMERY JOHNS 




Dr. Johns is seated to the right. 



Maryland College Teacher 
of the Mid-Nineteenth Century 



LJhortly before the civil war 
the Maryland Agricultural College, 
which later merged into the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, opened near Bla- 
densburg, Prince George's County. 1 
The war period and following years 
were very difficult for the new school 
— it was hard to keep either a student 
body or faculty. 2 One of the numer- 
ous teachers in the early days was 
Montgomery Johns, a graduate in 
medicine, a man of some skill in 
writing, and also of some financial 
means. In fifteen years he held five 
different teaching positions. 



Montgomery was the son of Henry 
Van Dyke Johns, native of New Cas- 
tle, Delaware, and Lavinia (Mont- 
gomery) Johns. 3 The elder Johns was 
an Episcopal clergyman and held 
churches in Washington, D. C, Roch- 
ester, N. Y., Cincinnati, Ohio, Fred- 
erick, Maryland, and finally Balti- 
more. W Other members of the 
family were prominent in politics 
(Delaware) and church (Virginia). 
Montgomery was born in Washing- 
ton, D. C, during his father's minis- 
try at Trinity Church in that city, 
1827 to 1830.V Henry was also 



by Theodore L. Bissell 

chaplain of the Senate while his 
brother Kensey, Jr., was a member 
of the Congress from Delaware. ,l ,"'." 
Thus, the boy had the advantage of 
a cultured and cosmopolitan rearing. 
I have no information on his earh 
schooling. 

Montgomery was a graduate of 
Princeton University, or College of 
New Jersey as it was then known, 
Class of 1847. 1 - This happened to be 
the year of the first centennial of the 
College and members of the class 
were awarded diplomas (A. B. de- 
gree) during the elaborate celebra- 
tion. Montgomery Johns was listed 
as from Maryland, and James Mont- 
gomery Johns, who may have been 
a close cousin, as from Delaware. 

The 1850 Census of Baltimore 
lists Johns as a teacher. About 1851 
he entered the University of Mary- 
land Medical School and in 1853 re- 
ceived the M.D. degree. 11 The same 
year there was published in Philadel- 
phia, under the authorship of Mont- 
gomery Johns, "A clinical phrase 
book; in English and German, con- 
taining the usual questions and 
answers employed in examining and 
prescribing for patients — with an 
English-German and German-English 
pronouncing lexicon, grammatical ap- 
pendix, table of idioms, . . .". This 
book in octavo, 1 6 cm high and con- 
taining 308 pages indicates a thor- 
ough knowledge of both medicine 
and the German language. In the 
preface the author explains the need 
for such a work among the many 
immigrants in the cities along the 
Atlantic Coast and further proposes 
the cultural value of learning Ger- 
man. "These materials . . . have 
accumulated during the daily attend- 
ance of instruction in the hospital 
connected with the University of 
Maryland. . . . My mode being Raca- 
mier's plan." Rabbi Abraham Rice 
of Baltimore aided in translations. 
"To my brothers who have kindly 
shared with me every portion of the 
work, and the labor of reading the 
proofs, I am deeply indebted". 

After receiving his degree Mont- 
gomery was Professor of Natural 
Science at Baltimore City College for 
about a year. 11 Another source lists 
him as Professor of Chemistry at 
Maryland Institute.", 1 ' 1 In 1857, ap- 
parently for a short time only, he was 
Professor of the Practice of Medicine 
at Iowa College. 17 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



On September 16, 1X57, Johns 
married Salome Lydia Diffenderfer 
of Baltimore who lived 1834 to 
1914. ,s 

About this time Johns took the 
chair of Mathematics and Natural 
History at Washington College, Ches- 
tertown and continued there until 
1X60. The George Avery Bunting 
Library of the College has several 
papers relating to him. 19 First is a 
letter from Johns, about a former stu- 
dent, Joseph T. Burchinal, and an ac- 



The opening date was October 5, 1859. 
The occasion was fully reported in the 
Baltimore American and Commercial 
Advertiser, and other Baltimore and 
Washington newspapers of October 6. 

: The Country Gentleman, Albany, N. Y.. 
October 24, 1861, reporting on the con- 
dition of M. A. C said "some teachers, 
. . . have buckled on their armour and 
gone to the wars". 

American Historical Co.. 1940. Colonial 
and Revolutionary Lineages of America. 
Vol. 4, see pages 5 to 7. 
Smith, Joseph Tate, 1859. A Discourse 
on the Life and Character of Rev. Henry 
Van Dyke Johns, Late Rector. May 22, 
1859. Maryland Tract Society, Balti- 
more, 48 pages. 

'Allen, Rev. Ethan, 1869. Clergy in 
Maryland, of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church since the Independence of 1783. 
Baltimore. See page 43. 

: Howard, George W., 1873-1883. The 
Monumental City. Baltimore, 1,002 pages. 
See page 964. 

Inventory of Church Archives in the 
District of Columbia (Protestant Epis- 
copal Church), Vol. 1, 1940. Washing- 
ton. 382 + xi pages. Entry 76: Trinity 
Parish, First rector Rev. H. V. D. Johns. 
1827-1830. Services were held first in 
the council chamber of the City Hall. 
The first church building was on Fifth 
St., N. W., between D and E Streets; 
in 1936 the church was closed. Early 
records are not available. 

'The birth date of Montgomery Johns 
has not been established but his age as 
recorded in the United States Censuses 
of 1850, 21; 1860, 32; and 1870, 42; 
Baltimore, Chestertown, and College 
Station (College Park), respectively, in- 
dicate 1828 or 1829 as the year. 

'Allen, ibid. 

'Biographical Dictionary of the American 
Congress, 1774-1949. 1950, U. S. Gov- 
ernment Printing Office, Washington. 
Kensey Johns served 1827 to 1831. 

1 H. V. D. Johns was Senate Chaplain 
December 13. 1829 to December 19, 
1831 according to records of the Secre- 
tary of the Senate. 

"' The First Centennial Anniversary of the 
College of New Jersey, Celebrated June, 
1847. Princeton, N. J. Printed by John 
T. Robinson. 1848. 36 pages. 

:: Cordell, E. F. 1903. The Medical Annals 
of Maryland, 1799-1899. Page 455. 

'Princeton University General Catalogue, 
1746-1906. 1908. Page 172. 

;Cordell. ibid. 

B The Maryland Institute for the Promo- 
tion of Mechanic Arts was organized in 
Baltimore in 1825 "for the instruction 
and improvement of the masses". It 
lapsed in 1835 and was reorganized in 
1847. G. W. Howard, ibid, pages 41 
and 980. 

1 Princeton Catalogue, ibid. 

8 American Historical Co., ibid. 

j Made available by Mr. Robert G. Bailey, 
Librarian. 



March-April, 1964 



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companying letter to Burchinal sug- 
gesting to him several openings as a 
teacher; second, a record of Johns' 
resignation of June 18, 1860, in the 
minutes of the Visitors and Governors 
of Washington College; third, a pro- 
gram of the Commencement exercises 
held at Chestertown, August 6 to 8, 
1 860, wherein Dr. Johns is listed as 
addressing the Mount Vernon Literary 
Society; and fourth, a letter, Locker- 
man to Burchinal, which mentions 
Johns. As Johns in his letter about 
Burchinal states he taught this man 
"more than two years", it is con- 
cluded that Johns went to Washing- 
ton College late in 1857 or early the 
next year as successor to one John 
Marshall Colby who had resigned in 
September, 1857. 

The name of M. Johns, age 32, 
Teacher, is recorded in the 1860 
Census taken at Chestertown on June 
1 1 . With him are his wife, Salome, 
age 28, and two children, Ann, age 2; 
and Lavinia, age 8/12. 2n 

Montgomery Johns' incumbency at 
Maryland Agricultural College began 
in the second year of its operation, 
1 860, and continued several years. 
His name is listed in five successive 
circulars or catalogs of the College: 
1860 to 1865, except 1862 when 
apparently none was issued, with the 
lengthy title "Professor of the Science 
of Agriculture, Chemistry, Geology 
and Mineralogy". Johns shortened 
this to "Prof. Chemistry" in the 
Burchinal letter which was written 
from the "Laboratory of Agricultural 
College, Md. Ap. 25, 1862". At the 
same time he was teaching anatomy 
at Georgetown Medical College. 

A Maryland Agricultural College 
student, Thomas L. Lockerman, 
writing May 11, 1861 to his friend 
Joseph Burchinal in Chestertown tells 
that Dr. Johns treated him for 
strained muscles, incurred "tusseling 
in the passage". He quoted the doc- 
tor as saying he might "be troubled 
with it for a year, or maybe not more 
than a week" — a noncommittal diag- 
nosis, or possibly an effort to allay 
the boy's concern. Lockerman also 
told his friend of soldiers stationed 
along the road from Washington to 
the Relay House, "a bad state of 
affairs". On short rations some sol- 
diers begged food at the College. 21 



"" Eighth Census, I860 Free Inhabitants, 
Kent County, Maryland. 

21 This letter was published in the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Alumni Association 
Newsletter, Alumni Day 1961. (College 
Park, Maryland) 



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28 



the Maryland Magazine 



Floridc Clemson, a visitor at com- 
lencement in 1 864, found Dr. Johns' 
lecture on ' 'Literary Culture' or 
something of the sort, awfully dull 
id long." And too she was piqued 
yhen "Mrs. and Dr. Johns" raised a 
report that she was engaged to Mr. 
Onderdonk, President of the Col- 
lege. -'" Miss Clemson was under- 
standably more interested in the 
younger and unattached men on the 
campus and nearby. 

There was an exciting event in 
July, 1864 when a force of Confed- 
erates under Gen. Bradley T. John- 
son, cavalry leader and a native 
Marylander, invaded Maryland Agri- 
cultural College. Johnson was work- 
ing under direction of Gen. Jubal A. 
Early 22 whose force passed through 
Rockville and threatened Washing- 
ton, July 11 and 12. The Washington 
Republican in an unsigned article 
entitled "Disloyalty Unmasked" bit- 
terly accused the M.A.C. faculty — 
President Onderdonk, Dr. Wharton, 
Dr. Johns, Mrs. Johns and "Miss 
Bettie" in particular — of befriending 
and lavishly entertaining the Rebels 
and of scorning the Union investi- 
gators who came later. The Baltimore 
American (July 22, 1864) reprinted 
the story and demanded an investiga- 
tion and purge of the College by State 
authorities. Dr. Johns replied to the 
American (July 27) with an account 
of the passage of the troops and of 
his own actions. 

Johns said the rebels stopped on 
the turnpike in front of Rossburg 
(presently called Rossborough Inn) 
ten minutes, then proceeding toward 
Bladensburg, were met by (Union) 
skirmishers at "Kenedy's Hill" and 
turned westward through the cam- 
pus. Some of the Confederates 
stopped at the Johns home and de- 
manded food. Johns was taken to 
see the leader, Gen. Johnson, "his 
distant Kinsman". 23 Altogether the 
troops, stated to be five hundred in 
number, were on the campus "about 
forty-five minutes." Johns denies dis- 
loyalty on his part or that of any 
other member of the faculty (he 
names Onderdonk, Wharton, Glover, 



: " McGee, C. M. and E. M. Lander Jr. 
1961. A Rebel Came Home. University 
of South Carolina Press, Columbia. Page 
54. 

"Bradford, N. W. 1956. Battles and 
Leaders of the Civil War. Appleton- 
Century, N. Y. Pages 527-537, "In sight 
of the dome of the Capital," by J. A. 
Early. 

13 Montgomery's uncle. Bishop John Johns, 
married Julianna Johnson. Aunt of Brad- 
ley Johnson. See John Sumner Wood, 
The Virginia Bishop, Garrett and Massie, 
Richmond, Va.. 1961, page 46. 



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Lorina, and Mrs. Johns) and asks 
that judgement be withheld until an 
investigation, already started by Un- 
ion authorities, be finished. He re- 
ferred to his career as a teacher and 
stated he had lived in Maryland 
"above suspicion" for 16 years, ap- 
parently referring to the beginning of 
his family's residence in Baltimore 
when he himself was 20 years of age. 

Testimony from several local resi- 
dents filed with the Union military 
authorities within two weeks (Baker- 
Turner file 4091, National Archives) 
overwhelmingly labeled Johns and his 
associates as Confederate sympathiz- 
ers and aides, and apparently they 
were. However we can not know 
how prejudiced and partisan the wit- 
nesses were. It was a time of strong 
feeling on both sides. 

An important fact of John's tenure 
at the Maryland Agricultural College 
is that he invested $6,800 in the 
bonds of the College, dated July 1, 
1860, thus showing confidence in the 
new endeavor.- 1 But the College 
could not redeem the bonds in the 
allotted five years and instead deeded 
to Johns on May 6, 1865, 62% acres 
of land, "together with the buildings 
and improvements thereon erected" 
from the southern edge of the college 
property of 428 acres, known as the 
Rossburg farm.-"' In addition to the 
surrendered bonds Johns paid for 
the property $855.15. The bonds 
were secured by a first mortgage exe- 
cuted to Johns Hopkins 258 and George 
William Brown of Baltimore and 
George W. Rigges of Washington, 
trustees for holders of the bonds. Dr. 
John C. Wharton, Register of the 
College, was appointed attorney for 
execution of the deed and James T. 
Earle signed it as President of the 
College. 

The Johns property, which became 
known as Homeside or Woodside, 
had a substantial house which stood 



-' Montgomery's father, H. V. D. Johns, 
died April 22, 1859, leaving a consider- 
able estate to his wife and six children. 
Montgomery received real estate in New 
Castle, Delaware, and about $12,000 in 
ground rents and cash. Thus he had the 
ready money to invest in the College 
bonds. — Will probated June 24, 1859, 
Office of the Register of Wills, City of 
Baltimore. Examined for me by my 
brother, Paul F. Bissell, December 7, 
1959. 

'' Deed Maryland Agricultural College to 
Johns. Prince George's County Land 
Records. Liber F. S. No. 2, pages 633- 
635. 

"''Johns Hopkins was a third cousin of the 
Rev. Dr. Henry Van Dyke Johns. The 
Virginia Bishop, p. 153. (Note by John 
Sumner Wood.) 



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the Maryland Magazini 




until September 1961. - (i It was built 
for the professors of the college at 
the beginning, as a companion to the 
one on the north side of the campus 
built for the president. The latter 
was known in recent years as Ger- 
neaux Hall, first dormitory for coeds 
of the University of Maryland. The 
two houses had similarities in con- 
struction. A wing was added to the 
north end of the Johns house which 
traditionally he used as a classroom 
and dormitory for boarding students 
of preparatory school age. Mrs. O. E. 
Baker of College Park, a recent occu- 
pant of the house, found a black- 
board covered with paint and coat 
pegs on the walls of the wing. 

Bearing on the Maryland Agri- 
cultural College — Johns transactions 
are several items in a report of the 
trustees made in 1864.' 7 The College 
had issued coupon bonds in the 
amount of $11,900 which netted 
$10,873. This sum must have in- 
cluded Johns' investment. Second 
item: the trustees, faced with a debt 
of over $40,000 had authorized the 
sale of about 200 acres of the Ross- 
burg farm "which when effected will 
leave 228 acres with all buildings on 
the property". They added in justi- 
fication that the remaining area 
would much exceed that required by 
the charter (50 acres) and be amply 
sufficient for all purposes of the in- 
stitution. The area was ample for 
many years but the sale to Johns did 
include a building. The report further 
noted that $7,351.1 1 had been spent 
for the erection of suitable buildings 
for residences of the president and 
professors. 

One of Johns' contemporaries at 



-" 43 13 Knox Road. College Park. 

''" Report of the Trustees of the Maryland 

Agricultural College to the Legislature 

of Maryland. January Session, 1864. 

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,_ 



the Maryland Agricultural College 
was Townend Glover. -Entomologist 
of the United States. Professor of 
Natural History. Botany and Pomol- 
ogy". Glover played w ith Johns' chil- 
dren, according to Anna Hopper 
Evans, his granddaughter." and later 
helped one child. Lavinia, and her 
husband to become established in 
Baltimore. Glover spent his last years 
with Lavinia Johns Hopper whom the 
biographer C. R. Dodge calls Glover's 
"adopted daughter". 29 

On August 17. 1869, Dr. Johns 
and his wife Salome Lydia Johns 
deeded, for the sum of $200, two 
acres of Woodside farm to James 
Stewart. Johns marked the corners 
of the plot with marble stones. 80 , 81 

Johns' most significant work was 
as teacher in the Medical Department 
of Georgetown College, District of 
Columbia, for some nine years in the 
1860's. The school was opened in 
1851 and grew considerably during 
the Civil War period with the demand 
for military surgeons. (1862, 3 grad- 
uates; 1865, 20; 1868, 47). Johns' 
title was Professor of General Micro- 
scopic and Descriptive Anatomy, 
changed in the last years to Professor 
of Anatomy, General and Descrip- 
tive. He served from September 1 1 , 
1861, to June 18, 1870, when he 
resigned "in a huff". Lectures were 
given in the evenings beginning at 
"5Vi PM", Monday through Satur- 
day. Prof. Johns in 1869 was sched- 
uled on Mondays and Wednesdays at 
8!/ 2 PM. 

The medical school was located in 
downtown Washington, first at 12th 
and F Streets and later at 10th and 
E Streets, N. W., and Johns may 
well have used the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad from and to his home 
at "Woodside". 

In 1868 the medical faculty of 
eleven men had themselves photo- 
graphed and presented a copy to 
Georgetown College. Our picture of 
Johns is reproduced from this copy.'- 
The Library of Congress has 
copies of two printed addresses by 
Johns, "Valedictory, delivered at the 
commencement of the Medical De- 
partment of Georgetown College, 
March 3, 1862", and "Address- 
delivered at the opening of George- 
town College, October 1 , 1 868". The 
first has 16 pages, the second 23. 
The valedictory to graduating stu- 
dents in 1862 is beautifully written 
as an inspiration to new medical prac- 
titioners. Johns emphasizes devotion 
to one's chosen profession and the 
need to build on one's experiences 



Johns pays tribute to one of his 
teachers Joseph Roby, at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland eleven years before, 
and reviews his association with the 
Georgetown students during the past 
year. He concludes with an admoni- 
tion against forgetting the teachings 
of literature, philosophy and religion. 
The address given at the opening 
of school in 1 868 is also of an in- 
spirational nature. By sketching the 
practice of medicine from ancient 
times to the present Johns stresses 
the need of dignity, a good appear- 
ance, "Kind politeness and polite 
kindness" to patients, and the com- 
pulsion of constantly improving the 
"science and art of medicine". Johns 
looks forward to the instruction to be 
gained from the large collection of 
"good and bad medicine and surgery" 
in the army medical museum assem- 
bled in Washington during the "re- 
cent American rebellion." 

Each address is prefaced by a 
letter from students asking for publi- 
cation of the talk just given, and an 
apology from Johns on the hasty 
preparation. This may have been a 
customary relation between pupil and 
teacher. The second letter Johns 
writes from Woodside, his home near 
the M.A.C. campus. 

During the Civil War Johns served 
as a surgeon in Washington and paid 
a substitute in lieu of military service, 
says Mrs. Evans, but we find no rec- 
ord of this. 

In 1866 he was granted an hon- 
orary M.D. degree by the University 
of Pennsylvania and an honorary 
Ph.D. degree by Princeton Univer- 
sity. 33 

Montgomery Johns died July 28, 
1871 at Bladensburg (College Park) 
and was buried in Greenmount 
Cemetery, Baltimore. 34 



■ s Mrs. James H. Evans, Wellesley Hills, 
Massachusetts, daughter of Lavinia, per- 
sonal communications, April to October, 
1959. 

29 Dodge, C. R. 1888. The Life and En- 
tomological Work of the Late Townend 
Glover, First Entomologist of the U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. USDA, Di- 
vision of Entomology. Bulletin 18, 68 
pages. 

'" Prince George's County Land Records, 
Liber H. B. No. 2, page 681. 

"The Ninth Census taken August 1870 
for College Station, Bladensburg Dis- 
trict, Prince George's County, Maryland, 
lists at the top James Stewart, Laborer, 
and Isabella Stewart, natives of Ireland. 
Following immediately are the names of 
Montgomery Johns, age 42, Physician, 
born Dist. Columbia; Salome, 37; Nancy. 
12; Lavinia, 11; Henry, 8; and three 
servants. This census also gives the 
names of President Register and several 
professors of the College, with their 
families, and of 66 young males who 
must have been college students. 



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:: " Besides the catalogs of the College and 
its Medical Department, the George- 
town University Library has two un- 
signed manuscripts "Chronicle of the 
first fifty years of the Georgetown Med- 
ical School" and "History of the Medical 
School of Georgetown University, 1900". 
from which several items have been 
drawn. These and the photograph were 
made available by Father W. C. Repetti. 
S. J.. Archevist. 

11 Princeton University General Catalogue, 
ibid. 

" Records of St. Lukes Church. Bladens- 
burg, Md., in St. Matthews Parish Hall. 
Hyattsville. Jno. B. Williams was the 
clergyman of St. Lukes. He recorded 
that Dr. Johns was baptized, confirmed, 
and a communicant of the Protestanl 
Episcopal Church. 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



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Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXVI May-June Number 3 




The Covur: Under completion this summer are foui major buildij 
The Adult Education Center. The Fine Arts Building, Elkton Hal) 
dormitory), and the College of Education and General ( lassroom Build 
ing. Pictured on the cover are workmen waiting lor a cargo ol brick 
for the Fine Arts Building. Anne Arundel Hall is in the background. 
Two other inside cover photographs require description. On the | 
opposite are Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, '34. newly-elected President ol th< 
Alumni Association; and Col. J. Logan Schutz, '38, newly-appointed 
Director of the University's Office ol Alumni Affairs. Biographical 
sketches of Mrs. Chapman and other new officers of the Alumni Associa 
tion will appear in the next issue. Moth of these photographs were taken 
by Doran Levy, a student assistant in the University's News Bureau. 
The other photograph, on the inside back cover, shows (apt. Donald I 
Koelper, USMC, 32 years of age, who served as an advisor to the Fourth 
Marine Battalion of the Republic of Viet Nam. Smiling Donald Koelpei 
loved children. This photograph shows youngsters following him in a 
South Vietnamese village. Capt. Koelper was six semester hours short 
of obtaining a Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Maryland, 
when on February 16, he was killed by a bomb in a Saigon movie house. 
When he caught sight of a terrorist placing a bomb in the theatre where 
500 Americans and their dependents were sitting. Capt. Koelper ran down 
the aisle shouting: "Everyone get down. There's a bomb!" The bomb 
exploded and Capt. Koelper was killed by falling debris. Donald Koelpei 
didn't want to be a hero. He wanted to be a history professor. 



J^ The Class of 1964 is Graduated 

(5 Alumni Day 

y Alumni and Campus Notes 

£ Through the Years 

[ J) Maryland: Her Promise to Her People 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

RICHARD W. CASE, Assistant Treasurer 

DR. WILLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

WILLIAM C. WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY R ELATION S 
J. B. ZATMAN. Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINE SS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

MRS. ERNA R. CHAPMAN, '34, President 

THE HONORABLE JOSEPH L. CARTER, '25, Vice-Presidenl 

MYLO S. DOWNEY. '27, Vice President 

COL. J. LOGAN SCHUTZ, '38. '40. Secretary Treasurer 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OFFICE OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS 

COL. J. LOGAN SCHUTZ. Director 



MARYLAND MA GAZINE STAFF 

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4* 



The Class of 1964 is Graduated 



THE MARSHALL EXTENDED THE MACE TOWARDS THE 
organist — the strains of the "March of the Priests" 
from Athalie by Mendelssohn boomed over the filled-to- 
capacity Cole Activities Building — and Commencement 
Exercises, 1964, were officially underway at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

This was the moment that 3,727 graduates had been 
waiting for — when they would at last file into the Field 
House, with all the pomp and circumstance due them — 
and receive their diplomas. Celebrating with them at 
10 a.m. Saturday, June 6, were more than 12,000 parents, 
relatives and friends, who proudly watched as President 
Wilson H. Elkins conferred academic degrees upon the 
candidates. 

The Rev. Mr. Merrill A. Stevens, Episcopal Chaplain 
at the University, delivered the Invocation, after which 
greetings were extended by the Honorable Thomas B. 
Finan, LL.B. '39, Attorney General of the State of Mary- 
land. 

Mr. Finan extended his own personal congratulations 
as a fellow alumnus, as well as those of Governor Tawes, 
who could not attend the exercises because his presence 
was required at the Governor's Conference in Cleveland. 

"Your commencement day represents a triumph for 
each of you — and your parents," said the Attorney Gen- 
eral. He said that the University of Maryland, more 
than any other, can be called "The University of the 
World" because of its instructional programs available 
to servicemen at campuses abroad. 



Charles P. McCormick, Chairman of the Board of Re- 
gents, also greeted the graduates and advised them. 
"You will be happier if you fear not the future and weep 
not over the past." And he concluded with, "Have cour- 
age and faith, and work dilligently, and you'll have happi- 
ness." 

Principal commencement speaker was Stuart T. Saun- 
ders, Chairman of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, 
who told the graduates that the world of today is far more 
difficult and complicated than it was when they entered 
it only about two decades ago, "for it is a world shrunken 
by the jet and the missile and frightened by the atom. 

"Yet, in many respects, it is a world in which you are 
better prepared to make your own way than your parents 
and grandparents," he continued. "For you have the 
advantages of flexibility, of open-mindedness, and of 
adaptability to change which regretfully seem to diminish 
as one advances in years. 

"The manner in which you accept the responsibilities, 
seek solutions to the unsolved problems you have inher- 
ited, and exercise your prerogatives of choice and deci- 
sion could very well make the difference, within your 
lifetime, between the renewal or the decline of democ- 
racy as we know it," he said. "The primary assignment 
for your generation is the development, within our rela- 
tively mature society, of a satisfactory, workable frame- 
work within which continuous innovation and reinvigora- 
tion of our democracy can occur." 

The greatest problem for the graduates, Mr. Saunders 



the Maryland Magazine 




said, is how to become mature without losing flexibility 
and responsiveness. "The knowledge which you have 
acquired here at the University of Maryland — the edu- 
cational basis upon which you will continuously enlarge — 
will help you find answers to this problem," he stated. 

"I am not willing to concede that you young people, 
as individuals, cannot bring new vitality to the old 
ideals; that you cannot replenish the reservoir of philo- 
sophical, political and religious traditions in which our 
ideals of freedom are nourished," said Mr. Saunders. 
"I am firmly convinced that you are equipped, through 
your heritage, your own ingenuity and your unique pre- 
paredness for the kind of civilization you face, to develop 
progressively the moral and ethical values which give 
cohesion to our otherwise divergent and pluralistic soci- 
ety." 

Freedom is the existence of alternatives or choices, Mr. 
Saunders said, "and you have today a multiplicity of 
choices far beyond those of other generations. Modern 
transportation and communication have opened to you 
horizons unlimited, with abundant opportunity to com- 
pare your culture, your attitudes and ideas, with those 
of people all over the world." 

Mr. Saunders continued, "If we can be certain of any- 
thing, it is that we can never return to a simple life. . . . 
Whether or not you utilize change to your advantage 
or are consumed by it depends upon how well you meas- 
ure up to the challenges of your time. 

"Sometimes I think that 'life, liberty and pursuit of 



happiness' should have been written as 'life, libert) and 
happiness ol pursuit'," he s.mi ■ | believe n 
of my generation recognize thai nuc happinest lit 
the pursuit oi worthwhile objective 

Mr. Saunders continued In asking th< gradual to in- 
volve themselves, "to establish .1 purpose foi '."in life 
and commit yourselves to values which you can sincere!) 
cherish. Much talent is wasted and much potential 
unrealized because ol a general sense oi aimlessness and 
drift." 

He warned the graduates that then lifetimes are likely 
to be filled with tumult and competition demanding and 
challenging, yet bristling with opportunity foi the 

strong, the courageous and the well-prepared, and he 

concluded that "As tree individuals, you must respond to 

these challenges. You must set your own difficult goals 

and be your own haul taskmasters I he true measure 
of a man. a nation or a civilization is the ability and the 
will to face crisis with courage and determination." 

Following Mr. Saunders' address, he was presented foi 
the honorary degree of Doctor ol Laws by Dr. Albm 
Kuhn, Executive Vice President. Mr. Saunders, who as- 
sumed the chairmanship of the Pennsylvania Railroad last 
year, received the Bachelor of Arts degree from Roanoke 
College in 1930 and the Bachelor oi laws from the llai 
vard Law School in 1934. He practiced law in Washing- 
ton, D.C. and then began service with the Norfolk and 
Western Railway. In 1958 he became President ol the 
Company. He serves as Director of a number of banks and 
other companies and is a member of the President's Ad- 
visory Committee on Labor-Management Policy; the Presi- 
dent's Business Committee for the National Cultural 
Center; and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; and 
serves as Trustee for Roanoke College, Hollins College, 
the Virginia Foundation for Independent Colleges, the 
John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library Corporation, and the 
Foundation for Independent Colleges, Inc. of Pennsylva- 
nia. He is the recipient of the Salzberg Medal for Dis- 
tinguished Contributions to Transportation, and the 
Hampton Roads Maritime Association Award lor Dis- 
tinguished Service. 

An honorary Doctor of Laws degree was also conferred 
upon the Honorable Emory Hamilton Niles. Judge 
Niles was presented for the degree by Dr. William P. 
Cunningham, Dean of the School of Law. Judge Niles 
served as Chief Judge of the Supreme Bench of Baltimore 
City from 1954 to 1962. He began his service with that 
body as Associate Judge in 1938. Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity conferred on him the Bachelor of Arts degree in 191 3 
and he studied as a Rhodes Scholar from 1913 to 1916 
at Oxford University, receiving from that school the 
degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Master of Arts and Bachelor 
of Civil Law. He received the Bachelor oi Laws degree 
from the University of Maryland in 1917. He was a lec- 
turer at the University from 1925 to 1956 in the laws ol 
admiralty and evidence. He also lectures on medical 
jurisprudence at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. 
Judge Niles is a member of the American Bar Associa- 
tion, the Baltimore City Bar Association, and the Mary- 
land Bar Association and has served in executive posi- 
tions in these bodies. He is now President of the Institute 
of Judicial Administration of New York, and is an Hon- 
orary Fellow of Hertford College. Oxford. He is the 
founder and Editor of American Maritime Cases, 

Dr. Russell B. Allen. Associate Dean of the College ol 
Engineering, presented for the honorary degree. Doctor 
of Engineering, Stanton Walker. Director of 1 ngmeer- 



May-June, 1964 



ing Emeritus of the National Sand and Gravel Associa- 
tion and the National Ready Mixed Concrete Associa- 
tion. Mr. Walker was responsible for the establishment 
in 1938 of the Joint Research Laboratory at the University 
of Maryland, beginning a relationship between the Uni- 
versity and the two associations unique in engineering. 
He was also responsible for the establishment of the Re- 
search Fellowship Foundation which supports study and 
research leading to the master's or doctor's degrees in 
engineering. He also established at the University the 
Annual Short Course on Concrete and Concrete Aggre- 
gates. Mr. Walker has served as a member of the Exec- 
utive Committee of the American Society for Testing 
Materials, President of the American Concrete Institute, 
and as a member and Chairman of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Highway Research Board. 

An honorary Doctor of Letters degree was bestowed on 
Dr. Rene Wellek, Sterling Professor of Comparative Lit- 
erature and Chairman of the Department at Yale Uni- 
versity. Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs, presented Dr. Wellek. Dr. Wellek is 
currently President of both the International and the 
American Association of Comparative Literature. His 
principal books are Kant in England, The Rise of English 
Literary History, Theory of Literature, A History of 
Modern Criticism, Concepts of Criticism, and Essays on 
Czech Literature. Dr. Wellek received his Doctor of 
Philosophy degree from the University of Prague in 1926. 
He has taught at Princeton University and the University 
of Iowa in this country, and in Czechoslovakia and Great 
Britain. He has been in residence at Yale since 1946. In 
1959, Dr. Wellek received the Prize for Distinguished 
Service to Humanistic Scholarship of the American Coun- 
cil of Learned Societies. 

Artist Andrew Wyeth received the honorary degree, 
Doctor of Fine Arts. Mr. John Lembach, of the Depart- 
ment of Art, presented Mr. Wyeth. Mr. Wyeth's temperas 
hang in most of the major American museums: the Met- 
ropolitan Museum of Art, the Modern Museum of Art. 
the Milwaukee Art Center, the Wilmington Society of 
Fine Arts, the Addison Gallery of American Art, the To- 
ledo Museum of Art, the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 
the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, the William A. 
Farnsworth Library and Art Museum, the Shelburne Mu- 
seum, the New Britain Museum of American Art, the 
Wadsworth Atheneum and the Currier Gallery of Art. 
In 1963, President Kennedy selected Mr. Wyeth as one of 
the first recipients of the Medal of Freedom — the highest 
American civilian honor. In December of last year. Pres- 
ident Johnson presented it to him with a citation de- 
claring that "he has in the great humanist tradition 
illuminated and clarified the verities" of life. 

Honorary certificates of merit in agriculture were 
awarded to four Maryland citizens for their contributions 
to agriculture in the State. They were: Kenneth A. Clark, 
Talbot County; Harry M. McDonald, Baltimore County; 
Ruth J. Miller, Harford County; and Charles H. Rems- 
berg, Frederick County. 

FOLLOWING THE CONFERRING OF HONORARY DE- 
grees and certificates, the 1964 graduates filed onto 
the stage, each receiving his own diploma from his re- 
spective Dean. Dr. Elkins then requested that all par- 
ents, wives or husbands, stand so that the new graduates 
might applaud them for the help they gave them in 
obtaining their degrees. 

Musical selections. "Battle Hymn of the Republic." 



arranged by Waring, and "Thanks Be To God," from 
Elijah by Mendelssohn, were presented by the combined 
University Choral Groups, directed by Fague K. Spring- 
mann. 

Officers of the United States Air Force and the United 
States Marine Corps who successfully completed the 
ROTC program at the University received their commis- 
sions from Colonel Vernon H. Reeves, Professor of Air 
Science. 

Benediction was given by the Rev. Mr. Theodore R. 
Casper, Lutheran Chaplain at the University, followed bv 
the Recessional to the strains of the March from Tann- 
hauser by Wagner. 

Special music for the exercises was furnished by Charl- 
ton G. Meyer, University organist; Stewart L. Gordon 
and Paul P. Traver, pianists. Program coordinators were 
Professor George F. Batka and Dr. Paul R. Poffenber- 
ger. Marshal was Dr. Robert D. Rappleye. 

Commencement was preceded by a flurry of activities 
throughout the various schools and colleges within the 
University. 

The Reverend Walter J. Burghardt, S. J., managing 
editor of Theological Studies, addressed the University 
of Maryland Class of 1964 at a Baccalaureate Service on 
Sunday, May 31 in the Memorial Chapel in College Park. 

A native of New York City, Rev. Burghardt holds 
M.A. and Ph.L. degrees from Woodstock College, where 
he has served as Professor of Patrology and Patristic 
Theology since 1946. He obtained an S.T.D. degree from 
the Catholic University of America. 

Since 1957, he has served as coeditor of the Woodstock 
Papers. In 1958, he was named coeditor of Ancient 
Christian Writers. He also is president of the Patristic 
Academy of America and editor for patrology for The 
New Catholic Encyclopedia. 




The School of Nursing sponsored several activities in 
honor of its graduating seniors. On Saturday, May 23, 
special honors were awarded by Miss Virginia C. Conley. 
Chairman of the baccalaureate nursing program, to ten 
graduating nurses at the senior convocation held in the 
Health Sciences Library auditorium. Recipients were: 
Louise Stark, Baltimore, Nurses' Alumnae Association 
Award for the highest average in scholarship; Peggy E. 
Heffner, Baltimore, the Elizabeth Collins Lee Award, 
for the second highest average in scholarship; Bonnie 
Britt, Beltsville, the Mrs. John L. Whitehurst Award, 
for executive ability; Katherine O'Hare, Hyattsville, the 
Flora Hoffman Tarun Memorial Award, for leadership. 



the Maryland Magazine 



loyalty, and school spirit; Rebecca Hays, Baltimore, the 
Mrs. Charles A. Reifschneider Award, for the best pro- 
fessional appearance and conduct toward patients and 
hospital personnel; Patricia Downs, Ridgewood, New 
Jersey, the Neurosurgical Nursing Prize, for the most 
interest, enthusiasm, and proficiency in neurosurgical 
nursing; Connie Cooper, Baltimore, the Elizabeth Aitkcn- 
head Award for the most interest, enthusiasm, and profi- 
ciency in the nursing care of surgical patients; Jean Strand- 
quist, Salisbury, the Elizabeth Aitkenhead Award for the 
most interest, enthusiasm, and proficiency in operating 
room nursing; Carol Magee, Washington, D.C., the 
Woman's Auxiliary Board Award, for outstanding per- 
formance in professional nursing care; and Karen Keller 
Dickson, Glen Burnie, the Nurses' Alumnae Association 
Award for leadership in the professional student nursing 
organization. 

Dean Florence M. Gipe and Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, Vice 
President for Academic Affairs, greeted the graduating 
students. Principal speaker was Dr. Matthew Tayback, 
Deputy Commissioner of Health for Baltimore City and 
Associate Professor of Preventive Medicine at the School 
of Medicine. 

The Rev. F. Stuart Taylor of Providence Methodist 
Church delivered the Invocation and the Rev. James P. 
Koerber of St. Peter of the Apostles Catholic Church, the 
Benediction. A reception was held in Whitehurst Hall, 
following the ceremonies. 

Other senior activities included the class picnic Monday, 
June 1 and the cap-stringing banquet on Wednesday, June 
3 at Bernie Lee's in Towson. The seniors were also 
guests of the Nurses' Alumnae Association at the annual 
banquet and dance on Friday, June 5 at Blue Crest North 
in Pikesville, which this year celebrated the school's 
seventy-fifth anniversary. Dr. George H. Yeager, Pro- 
fessor of Clinical Surgery at the School of Medicine, was 
featured speaker. 

Newly elected members of the honorary dental fra- 
ternity, Omicron Kappa Upsilon at the Baltimore College 
of Dental Surgery, Dental School, were announced Wed- 
nesday evening, June 3, at the fraternity's annual banquet 
and convocation at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. 

The initiates were introduced by Dr. John J. Salley, 
Dean of the Dental School. Representing the upper 12 
per cent of the graduating class, they were: Lucien Ern- 
est Benoit, Woon, Rhode Island; Albert Edward Car- 
lotti, Jr., Warwick, Rhode Island; Wayne Lance O'Roark, 
Chevy Chase; Norman Henry Proulx, Manchester, New 
Hampshire; Rodney Frank Golden, Silver Spring; Ed- 
ward Robert Emerson and Clark Neamand Foulke, both 
of Hyattsville; and William Langton Brice, Francis Leon 
Fraser, Franklin Eugene May, Stanley Martin Plies, and 
Herbert Barry Taragin, all of Baltimore. 

Dr. Louis Kreshtool of Wilmington, Delaware was made 
an honorary member of the fraternity. A graduate of 
the University of Maryland Dental School, he is a past 
president of the Delaware State Dental Society and one 
of the founders of the Cleft Palate Clinic of Delaware. 

Graduates and alumni of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School, were honored on Friday, 
June 5, at an Academic and Awards Program held at the 
Health Sciences Library Auditorium. 

Dr. John J. Salley, Dean of the Dental School, pre- 
sented the following student awards: University Gold 
Medal for Scholarship, Summa Cum Laude, Albert Ed- 
ward Carlotti, Jr., Warwick, Rhode Island; Certificates 
of Merit, Magna Cum Laude, Lucien Ernest Benoit, Woon, 




Rhode Island. Francis Leon Fraser, Baltimore and I 
ward Robert Emerson and (lark V aiii.mil Foulke, !">'>th 
of Hyattsville; The Alumni Association Medal, Stanle) 

Martin Plies. Baltimore; I he Ham 1 Iakham Memo 
rial Medal. John Nicholas Russo, Wilmington, Dela- 
ware; The Harry E. kclsc) Memorial Award, Stephen 
Michael Grussmark. Miami Beach. Florida; I he Harr) 
B. Schwartz Award, Albert Edward Carlotti, Jr : I Ik 
Edgar J. Jacques Memorial Award. Glenn Boyd Dicker- 
son, Lexington, South Carolina: I he Herbert Freidb 
Memorial Key, John Patrick Hackett, Woodstown, V-u 
Jersey; The Timothy O. Heatwole (hair. Charles Ed- 
ward Toomey III, Baltimore; The Katharine loome) 
Plaque, Wayne Lance O'Roark. Chevy Chase; The Gray- 
son W. Gaver Memorial Award. Robert lore Early, 
Adelphi; The Sigma Epsilon Delta Memorial Medal. Her- 
bert Barry Taragin, Baltimore; The Alexander H. Pater- 
son Memorial Medal. Albert Edward Carlotti, Jr.; The 
Alpha Omega Scholarship Award. Albert Edward Car 
lotti, Jr. 

The Honorable Wilbur J. Cohen. Assistant Secretary 
of Health, Education, and Welfare, was the speaker at 
a convocation honoring the second graduating class ol 
the School of Social Work on Wednesday. May 27 in the 
auditorium of the Health Sciences Library. 

Mr. Cohen, on leave from the University of Michigan 
School of Social Work since he was appointed to his pre- 
sent post in 1961. is a Professor of Public Welfare Ad- 
ministration and has been affiliated with the University 
of Michigan School of Social Work since 1956. He is a 
former Director of the Division of Research and Statistics 
of the Social Security Administration and has repre- 
sented the U.S. government in international conferences 
on social security, social work, and labor. 

The School of Social Work awarded Master of Social 
Work degrees to 16 candidates at the Commencement 
exercises in College Park. 

THE 1964 HONOR AWARD AND GOLD KEY I ROM till 
Medical Alumni Association of the University of 
Maryland was presented on May 8 to Dr. Hugh R. 
Spencer, retired Chairman of the Pathology Department 
of the School of Medicine. 

Dr. Spencer, a native oi Jarrettsville, Maryland, was 
graduated in 1910 from the Baltimore Medical College 
and was appointed Associate Professor of Pathology and 
Bacteriology at the University of Maryland in 1913. a 
post he retained until he left to serve as a pathologist 
with the First Army during World War 1. Shortly after 
his return from France in 19 ls>. he was named Professor 
of Pathology. In 1921, he was made Head of the Depart- 
ment. From 192? to 1950, Dr. Spencer's name appeared 
frequently in national and local medical journals. His 
service to the school includes main years spent on the 
student admissions committee. A member ol the lnter- 



May-June, J 964 



national Academy of Pathology, he became Emeritus 
Professor of Pathology upon his retirement as Head of 
the Department in 1956. 

Dr. Gibson J. Wells, who, as President of the Alumni 
Association, presented the award, commented on the sig- 
nificance of the occasion. 

•Here is truly a scholar and gentleman of the old 
school," Dr. Wells said. "His kindness, humility, dry 
humor, and ready accessibility to anyone seeking his aid 
and advice will long endear him in the hearts and mem- 
ories of his students." 

Two other Gold Key recipients of past years are mem- 
bers of the University of Maryland Medical School Class 
of 1914, which celebrated its fiftieth reunion that week. 
They are Dr. Nolan D. C. Lewis, Emeritus Professor of 
Psychiatry at Columbia University, who received the 
award in 1949, and Dr. Arturo Casilli, a leading New 
Jersey pathologist, who was the 1 962 recipient. 

Senior Week at the School of Medicine began on Sun- 
day, May 31, with a class picnic at the home of David 
M. Nichols, a member of the class. 

Other activities included the senior class banquet and 
dance on Tuesday, June 2, at Blue Crest North in Pikes- 
ville and Dean's Day pre-commencement exercises in the 
courtyard of University Hospital Friday afternoon, June 5. 

Principal speaker at the Dean's Day celebration was 
Dr. Paul J. Sanazaro, Director of the Division of Educa- 
tion of the Association of American Medical Colleges, 
who's subject was "Revolution and Renewal in Medicine." 

In addition to his position with the Association of 
American Medical Colleges, Dr. Sanazaro is a clinical 
Associate Professor of Medicine at the University of Illi- 
nois College of Medicine. A diplomate of the American 
Board of Internal Medicine and a fellow of the Ameri- 
can College of Physicians, Dr. Sanazaro is a graduate 
of the University of California School of Medicine and a 
former Associate Professor of Medicine at the University 
of California, San Francisco. 

The Dean's Day academic procession began at 1 : 45 
p.m. Following the convocation prayer by the Rev. Don- 
ald C. Kerr, Pastor of the Roland Park Presbyterian 
Church, Dr. R. Lee Hornbake, Vice President for Aca- 
demic Affairs, extended greetings to the graduating class. 

Prizes and honors were awarded to outstanding stu- 
dents by Dr. William S. Stone, Dean of the School of 
Medicine. 

Recipients were: Faculty Gold Medal (Summa Cum 
Laude), Charles Henry Asplen, Baltimore; Certificate 
of Honor (Magna Cum Laude), Richard Douglas Biggs, 
Jr., Baltimore; Certificates of Honor (Cum Laude), Don- 
ald Theodore Lewers and Marvin Frederick Saiontz, Bal- 
timore, Milton Siegfried Michaelis, Silver Spring, Charles 
Evans Reckson, Miami Beach, Florida, and Harold Clark 
Standiford, Aberdeen; Balder Scholarship Award for 
highest degree of academic achievement, Charles Henry 
Asplen; Dr. Leonard M. Hummel Medal for excellence 
in internal medicine, Donald Theodore Lewers; Dr. Harry 
M. Robinson Sr. Prize for excellence in dermatology, 
Marvin Frederick Saiontz; Dr. Wayne W. Babcock Award 
for excellence in surgery, Jonathan David Tuerk, Balti- 
more; Dr. Bradley Gaither Prize for excellence in genito- 
urinary surgery, Charles Evans Reckson; Medical Book 
Award for outstanding scholastic attainment, Stuart 
Handwerger, Ruth Elizabeth Luddy and Robert Elmer 
Stoner, all of Baltimore. 

In addition to these awards. Dean Stone presented to 
wives of graduating students certificates attesting to the 



assistance they had given their husbands in obtaining 
medical degrees. The wives, who acted as ushers at the 
exercises, were also hostesses at a reception and tea 
held in Howard Hall following the ceremonies. 

The Alumni Association of the University of Maryland 
School of Law held its annual banquet on Saturday, May 
2 at the Sheraton-Belvedere Hotel, Baltimore, and fea- 
tured an address by Dr. Manfred S. Guttmacher, Chief 
Medical Officer of the Supreme Bench of Baltimore City. 

Dr. Guttmacher, an Associate Clinical Professor ot 
Psychiatry at the University of Maryland School of Medi- 
cine, was a defense witness at the Dallas trial of Jack 
Ruby. His topic at the banquet was "A Psychiatrist 
Takes the Stand." 

The Honorable Joseph L. Carter, outgoing President of 
the Alumni Association, presided as toastmaster and 
introduced the following list of officers for the ensuing 
year: Thomas N. Berry, President; Samuel J. Fisher. 
First Vice-President; Emma S. Robertson, Second Vice- 
President; Perry G. Bowen, Jr., Third Vice-President; 
L. Whiting Farinholt, Jr., Secretary; and Benjamin A. 
Earnshaw, Treasurer. Members of the Executive Com- 
mittee are George W. Bowling, Clare Green Duckett, 
Harry E. Dyer, George Gump, M. King Hill, Thomas H. 
Lowe, James McSherry, William H. Price, H. Paul Rome, 
Ernest C. Trimble. 

Dean William P. Cunningham welcomed the graduating 
class to its forthcoming membership in the Association, 
and awarded the following honors and prizes: The Eliza- 
beth Maxwell Carroll Chesnut Prize, for good scholarship 
in a broad sense, John H. Gurley, Glen Arm; The Roger 
Howell Achievement Award, for leadership, scholarship, 
and moral character, H. Rutherford Turnbull III, Balti- 
more; The Sam Allen Memorial Prize for leadership and 
scholarship, Stanley David Klein, Baltimore; The Samuel 
S. Levin Prize, for character and leadership, Mrs. Shiela 
K. Sachs, Baltimore; The Lawyers Title Award, for pro- 
ficiency in the law of real property, Paul J. Stakem, 
Cumberland; The U.S. Law Week Prize, for most satis- 
factory progress in the senior year, Adrian J. Johnston, 
Hyattsville; The Nu Beta Epsilon Prize for the most 
significant piece of legal writing in the Maryland Law 
Review, Mrs. Shiela K. Sachs. 

Elected to the Order of the Coif (a national law school 
honor society founded to encourage scholarship and to 
advance the ethical standards of the legal profession; 
only students among the first tenth of the senior class 
are eligible): John H. Gurley, Glen Arm; Adrian J. 
Johnston, Hyattsville; Paul Stakem, Cumberland; and 
Berryl A. Speert, Baltimore. Faculty members elected 
were William G. Hall, Jr., Garrett Power and Sanford 
J. Rosen, all Assistant Professors of Law. An honorary 
member elected to the Order was J. Francis Ireton, a 
member of the Baltimore Bar, who spearheaded the adop- 
tion of the Uniform Commercial Code in Maryland. 

Maryland Law Review certificates were presented to: 
H. Rutherford Turnbull III, Jules R. Willen, Robert S. 
Fertitta, Mrs. Shiela K. Sachs, Abel J. Merrill, Stanley 
D. Klein, Ronald P. Fish, Berryl A. Speert, Louis B. 
Price, all of Baltimore; Austin J. McGreal, Philadel- 
phia; and John H. Gurley, Glen Arm, Maryland. 

The annual meeting of the Alumni Association of the 
University of Maryland School of Pharmacy was held at 
8 p.m. Thursday, June 11, in the Baltimore Union. 

Dr. Frank L. Black of Baltimore, a member of the 
class of 1904, received a certificate of distinction for 60 
years of service to the profession. 



the Maryland Magazine 




Dr. Arnold J. Toynbee addresses the Heidelberg Commencement 



Fifty-year certificates were presented to the following 
members of the class of 1914: Drs. Charles L. Armstrong, 
Samuel C. Cohen, L. Reyner Dukes, and Ferdinand 
Pross, Jr., all of Baltimore; Dr. Frank N. Britcher of 
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania; Dr. Claude H. Harris of Flo- 
rence, South Carolina; Dr. Israel Liebmann of Tampa, 
Florida; and Dr. Harvey E. Todd of Anderson, South 
Carolina. 

New Alumni Association officers were installed at the 
meeting and plaques were presented to the 1963-64 Pres- 
ident, Milton A. Friedman, class of 1934, and Dr. Mel- 
ville Strasburger, class of 1900, honorary President. 

THE CLASS OF 1964 OF THE FAR EAST DIVISION GRAD- 
uated in three separate ceremonies this year — in To- 
kyo, Japan; Seoul, Korea; and Kadena Air Base, Oki- 
nawa. 

Far East Division Director, Dr. Leslie R. Bundgaard, 
delivered a brief graduation address at each of the three 
ceremonies, in which he proudly reviewed Maryland's 
record of eight years in the Far East, during which 139,- 
254 enrollments have been recorded and 331 bachelor's 
degrees conferred. 

In Seoul, a banquet was held at the Eighth Army Offi- 
cers Club on March 26. Of the eleven students who had 
completed degree requirements during the year, six were 
present to receive their diplomas from Dean Ray Ehrens- 
berger. University College, who conferred them on be- 
half of Dr. Wilson H. Elkins. 

Among distinguished guests at the banquet were the 
Honorable Samuel D. Berger, U. S. Ambassador to Korea, 
who congratulated the graduates and the U. S. Armed 
Forces for providing the encouragement and financial 
support which makes it possible for persons to pursue a 
college degree overseas. Other guests included Donald 
G. Vorhis, special assistant to the Ambassador, and 
William E. Phipps, Counselor for Public Affairs. Amer- 



ican Embassy; Bi Gei G I i i i hth 

Army Deputy ( hie! ol Staff; and I ol i: njamin I 
man, Commanding Officer, 6313th \n Bas< G 
Air Base, 

Thirty-two bachelor's degrees were conferred in I 
although onlj thirteen students were present to 
their diplomas, in banquet ceremonies <>n March 10 in 
the Sanno Hotel. Background music i<>r this affaii 
provided in the Japanese Koto players 

David J. Rhoads, full-time lecturer in the division 
had completed all degree requirements on the ( ollege 
Park campus prior to coming to the Fai I ast, 

awarded a Doctor ol Education degree, probably the lirst 

time such a degree was given in the I ai l asl by anj 
U. S. college or university. 

Among guests present at the lokyo banquet were Maj 
Gen. and Mrs. Chester \\ . ( [ark, Maj den and Mi 
Ethan A. Chapman, and Brig. Gen. I) ( Polhamus, 
Chief of Staff, 5th AF. Dean Ehrensbergei was assisted 
in presentation of degrees by Dr. loseph I Dellen. 
Associate Director of the Far East Division, and Mrs 
Gene H. Bundgaard. Assistant Director ol Admissions and 
Registrations. 

On the evening preceding commencement, the Spring 
Faculty Banquet was held at the Sanno Motel, when 
Dean Ehrensberger presented the annual "You Never 
Had It So Good" award to Hugh D. Walker, who had the 
"the most harrowing experience of the year" with a 
Vietnamese terrorist. 

In ceremonies at the Wing Club, Kadena Air Base. Oki- 
nawa, 22 bachelor's degrees were awarded. Nine of the 
students graduated in absentia. 

During the ceremonies, Lt. Gen. Paul W. Caraway. U.S. 
Army, High Commissioner, Ryukyus Islands, was cited 
with a membership in Pi Sigma Alpha, national honorary 
society in political science. Dr. Bundgaard presented the 
citation. 

Dean Ehrensberger conferred the degrees, assisted by 
Dr. Walter V. Hohenstein, Assistant Director of the Far 
East Division. 

Distinguished historian Arnold J. Toynbee was Ma- 
tured speaker at the European Division Commencement 
ceremony in Heidelberg on Sunday, May 31. Professor 
Toynbee was also awarded a Doctor of Letters degree tor 
his contributions to world historiography. 

President Wilson H. Elkins conferred bachelors degrees 
upon 171 European Division students, the second largest 
number in 15 years of overseas operations. Nearly half 
of the Class of 1964 took their degrees in absentia, and 
93 candidates were present. 

Dr. Thomas B. Symons, Professor and Emeritus Dean 
of the College of Agriculture, represented the Board of 
Regents. 

Professor Toynbee. famous for his ten-volume Study 
of History, in which he elaborates a cyclical view of the 
world's civilizations, has written do/ens of other books 
since his graduation from Oxford in 1911. 

A former faculty member oi Oxford and London Uni- 
versities, Professor Toynbee is currently pursuing research 
at the Royal Institute oi International Allans in London. 
He holds honorary degrees from several leading Amer- 
ican and British universities, among them Oxford. Cam- 
bridge, Columbia and Princeton. 

Graduates and their guests had the opportunity o( meet- 
ing Professor Toynbee at a reception following the after- 
noon ceremony, which was held in the University's main 
auditorium, the Neue Aula. 



May-June, 1964 



The Class of 1909 ► 



ALUMNI DAY 



ALUMNI DAY, SATURDAY, MAY 16, 1964 DAWNED A PER- 
fect spring day — the day set for traditional spring 
class reunions on the College Park campus and in gen- 
eral for all University of Maryland alumni. Especially 
honored were the five-year classes, beginning with the 
Class of 1904, and on to 1909, 1914 (celebrating its 
Golden Anniversary), 1919, 1924, 1929, 1934, 1939 
(its Silver Anniversary), 1944, 1949 and 1954. 

Officially the day started with Registration at the Stu- 
dent Union Building's lobby, where many old friends 
met and greeted one another for the first time in a num- 
ber of years. 

Next on the agenda were the various school and col- 
lege business meetings where those present elected their 
officers for the ensuing year, and also representatives to 
the Alumni Council, which governs the entire Alumni As- 
sociation. President Elkins attended and visited with the 
alumni. 

Home Economics, getting an early start, held its busi- 
ness meeting at 9:00 a.m. in its own building. At this 
meeting, Dave Brigham, the former Director of Alumni 
Affairs and Secretary Pro Tern of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, 1963-64, was presented an award for his enthusi- 
astic support of the College of Home Economics. 

After the business meetings, class pictures of the Five- 
Year Reunion Classes were taken on the front steps of 
the Student Union Building. 

A delicious Alumni Luncheon was served in the Student 
Union Cafeteria beginning at approximately 11:30 a.m. 
The Five- Year Reunion Classes were seated at individ- 
ual tables. The new Director of Alumni Affairs, desig- 
nate, Col. J. Logan Schutz was introduced and expressed 
his desire to serve upon the assumption of his duties on 
July 1. 

Thomas Mullendore was the oldest alumnus present, 
and was celebrating his 60th Anniversary. He was the 
only one attending from the Class of 1904. J. J. T. Gra- 
ham and J. Milton Hunter from the Class of 1906, were 
the next oldest alumni present. 

At 2:00 p.m. many of the returning alumni wended their 
way over to Byrd Stadium to enjoy the final Intersquad 
Football Game of the spring training season. Following 
the game, there was a coffee hour at the Student Union. 
The visiting and reminiscing continued for an hour or 
more, when many of the returning alumni began leaving 
for other destinations. 

The Class of 1924 departed to enjoy a dinner at the 
Holiday Inn at 6:00 p.m. Approximately 20 indicated 
they would be there to celebrate their 40th Anniversary, 
and we know they are looking forward to their Golden 
Anniversary ten years hence. 

The engineers of the Class of 1929 had made plans for 
a cocktail party at Ledo's at 5:30 p.m. Approximately 
24 persons attended this gay affair. 

For the "young at heart" there was a concert given 
by Peter Nero at the Ritchie Coliseum at 8:00 p.m., 
which was a fitting way to end a really perfect Alumni 
Day. 



X 




The Class of 1929 




JM 

Tlie Class of 1939 meets for its 25th Reunion 





UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



JUNE 

6 Commencement 

15-19 Rural Women's Short Course 

22 Summer Session Registration 

23 Summer Session Begins 



AUGUST 

3-7 4-H Club Week 

14 Summer Session Ends 

SEPTEMBER 

8-11 Firemen's Short Course 



14-18 Fall Semester Registration 

19 Football. Oklahoma. Home 

21 Instruction Begins 

26 Football, South Carolina, Home 




Alumnus Edits New Book Retirees Honored 



New Telescope Installed 

In the photograph above, the University 
installs its 20-inch optical telescope at 
the Astronomical Observatory, located 
on the University golf course. 

The telescope has a mirror with a 
diameter of 20 inches, which concen- 
trates the starlight into a focus where 
pictures of the heavens can be made on 
photographic plates. Also, the intensity 
of the starlight can be measured with 
complicated and highly sensitive photo- 
electric photometers. 



W. A. Douglas Jackson, Ph.D., BPA, 
'53, Professor of Geography and Assist- 
ant Director of the Far Eastern and 
Russian Institute at the University of 
Washington, Seattle, is the Editor of a 
book of readings which comprise a new 
book in the field of contemporary geo- 
graphical thinking. 

Entitled Politics and Geographic Re- 
lationships, and published in June, 
1963, by Prentice-Hall, Inc., the book 
presents structural concepts underly- 
ing the phenomena and the motivations 
which dictate man's organization of 
both himself and the surface of the 
earth. 

The focus of the book is the political- 
territorial unit, or the state. The read- 
ings present discussions of the nature 
of the state and its characteristics 
and functions, with particular empha- 
sis on the makings of a people or the 
creation of a nation, followed by exam- 
inations of the problems of boundaries 
and frontiers, core areas and capital 
cities, doctrines of government and 
bases of economics and technology. A 
large section of the book deals with 
an examination of problems confront- 
ing underdeveloped states and newly 
emerging nations, and it closes with a 
detailed investigation of power and 
strategy on the international scene. 

Among the contributing authors are 
George Santayana, Gunnar Mydral and 
Karl W. Deutsch. 



A reception and tea honoring faculty 
members who retired this academic 
year was held recently at the Rossbor- 
ough Inn on the College Park Campus. 
President Wilson H. Elkins presented 
certificates to the guests of honor, who 
included: Fred L. Bull. Professor in 



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Agriculture; Geary F. Eppley, Dean of 
Men; Paul M. Galbreath, Soil Conser- 
vationist in Agriculture; Dr. Elizabeth 
E. Haviland, Assistant Professor in 
Agriculture; Frank K. Haszard, Direc- 
tor in Administration; Dr. G. Kenneth 
Reiblich, Professor in Law; Claire S. 
Schradieck, Assistant Professor in For- 
eign Languages; Dr. P. B. Storey, As- 
sociate Professor in Medicine: Dr. Al- 
len F. Voshell; Professor in Orthopedic 
Surgery; and Sivert M. Wedeberg, Pro- 
fessor in Accounting. 

The event was sponsored by the Fac- 
ulty Club and the American Association 
of University Professors. 



New University Relations 
Director is Appointed 

J. B. Zatman, Director of Public Re- 
lations for the Maryland-National Cap- 
ital Park and Planning Commission, 
has been named Director of University 
Relations at the University. Mr. Zat- 
man succeeds Mr. Robert J. McCart- 
ney, who moves to the University of 
Massachusetts. 

A graduate of the University of Pitts- 
burgh and Peabody High School in 
Pittsburgh, he also attended Cornell 
University. 

Zatman came to this area in 1937 as 
a reporter and later Assistant Editor 
of the Washington Star. In 1952 he was 
appointed Director of Public Relations 
for the Maryland-National Capital 
Park and Planning Commission. 

Between 1957 and 1959, he served as 
Public Information Officer for the 
Washington Suburban Sanitary Com- 
mission. He was an Administrative 
Assistant to Mrs. Gracie Pfost, a mem- 
ber of the House of Representatives 
from Idaho, from 1959 until 1960. He 
was reappointed to the Park and Plan- 
ning Commission post in 1960. 

Mr. Zatman is a member of Sigma 
Kappa Phi, honorary languages frater- 
nity, and the Public Relations Society 
of America. 

Robert J. McCartney, Director of 
University Relations at the University 
of Maryland since 1956, has resigned 
his position to accept the post of Secre- 
tary of the University of Massachu- 
setts, his Alma Mater, and Director of 
University Relations. 

In his new administrative post as 
Secretary, Mr. McCartney will serve 
the President of the University, the 
Board of Trustees, and the Faculty 
Senate, and as Director of University 
Relations, he will supervise the opera- 
tions of the News Service, Publica- 
tions Office and the Broadcasting and 
Photographic Service. 

Prior to coming to Maryland, Mr. 
McCartney was associated with the 
University of Massachusetts for sev- 
eral years, as News Editor, Director 
of Publications, and founder and first 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 



Editor of The Massachusetts Alumnus. 
While in Massachusetts, he also served 
as a communications and public rela- 
tions consultant in Worcester and 
Springfield. 

Mr. McCartney received his B.A. de- 
gree from the University of Massachu- 
setts in 1941 and attended the Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts Graduate School 
from 1946 to 1947. During World War 
II, he served as Cryptographic Super- 
visor in the U. S. Army Signal Corps. 

Mr. McCartney's publications include 
"Where Are We Going in Public Re- 
lations?", The Massachusetts Alum- 
nus, 1955, and "The Case for a Laurel 
League," also in The Massachusetts 
Alumnus, in 1956. He is listed in Who's 
Who in Public Relations and Who's 
Who in American Education. He has 
written, directed and produced three 
sound-color films: "Your State Univer- 
sity," for the University of Massachu- 
setts; and "The University of Maryland 
Choir in Puerto Rico" and "Climate 
of Learning," for the University of 
Maryland. 

In 1957, Mr. McCartney received 
White House Accreditation on the oc- 
casion of the British Royal visit to the 
University of Maryland. 

A leading figure in numerous pro- 
fessional organizations, Mr. McCartney 
is a member of the Greater Washing- 
ton Educational Television Association, 
the American College Public Relations 
Association, the American Alumni 
Council, and the Baltimore Public Re- 
lations Council. He is past president 
of the New England Land-Grant Public 
Relations Council, and was a charter 
member of the Information Committee 
of the American Association of Land- 
Grant Colleges and State Universities. 
He is also a member of the Advisory 
Board of The Humanities Center for 
Liberal Education and the Advisory 
Board of The Massachusetts Alumnus. 
He is a member of the Public Rela- 
tions Committee of the Southern Re- 
gional Education Board. 

Among the many honors accorded 
Mr. McCartney in recognition for his 
noteworthy achievements in the field 
of public relations have been the Alum- 
ni Citation of the University of 
Massachusetts; membership in the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts Honor Socie- 
ty, Sigma Delta Chi (professional 
Journalism fraternity), and Tau Kappa 
Alpha, (honorary Forensic fraternity). 

At the University of Maryland, he 
served as the first Director of Univer- 
sity Relations. He was charged by 
President Wilson H. Elkins with estab- 
lishing a professional public relations 
program including publications, speak- 
ers bureau, branch office in the Balti- 
more Professional Schools and, sub- 
sequently, a University Film Center. 
Recently, a service program to the 
broadcasting media was established. 
The existing News Service and Photo- 



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11 



graphic Sections were incorporated into 
University Relations when the office 
was established several years ago. 



Dentist-Population 
Ratio Drops 

Now short 500 dentists, the State of 
Maryland will be facing a shortage of 
1.150 by 1975 if the present ratio of 
one dentist for every 2,333 persons con- 
tinues, cautions a report from the 
School of Dentistry. 

Figures from the 1963 American 
Dental Association manpower survey 
put Maryland's ratio in sharp contrast 
to the national average of one dentist 
to every 1,709 persons. Of Maryland's 
23 counties, only Montgomery has a 
favorable ratio of 1:1,515. 

Baltimore City and County have a 
1:1,1985 ratio; the remaining 21 coun- 
ties average one dentist for every 3,- 
474 persons. 

The dental school report places eight 



counties on a "critical" list headed by 
Somerset County, where there is one 
dentist for every 9,750 persons. 

The others, in order, are Charles 
( 1 : 8,550) ; Queen Anne ( 1 : 8,450) ; Cal- 
vert (1:8,250); St. Marys (1:5,800); 
Anne Arundel (1:5,200); Cecil (1: 
5,110); and Dorchester (1:5,017). 

Projected population figures indicate 
that by 1980 some 126 additional den- 
tists will be needed in Maryland every 
year to meet the national average ratio. 

The University of Maryland School 
of Dentistry is in the midst of studies 
and planning to expand faculty, pro- 
grams, and facilities to permit entering 
classes of 1 28 each year. Present facili- 
ties can handle maximum entering 
classes of 100. 

While the number of out-of-state stu- 
dents has been decreasing since the 
recent openings of dental schools in 
New Jersey, North Carolina, and West 
Virginia, the enrollment of Maryland 
residents has been increasing steadily. 

Seventy-five per cent of Marylanders 




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1895-1919 

C. Baltimore Calvert, agr. '97, a 
Washington lawyer and a direct de- 
scendant of the Maryland Calverts of 
Colonial times, died at his home April 
15, 1964 after a long illness. 

Dr. W. C. Richardson, d.d.s. '98, 
died on February 7, 1964. 

Dr. Andrew F. Ludwig, pharm. 
'01, who operated a pharmacy in Balti- 
more for 35 years, died March 18, 
1964 at his home on Rosewood Avenue 
in Catonsville, Maryland. 

Curtis Atlee Sheely, d.d.s., '02, 
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, died at his 
home on June 27, 1964. He was a 
founder and a charter member of the 
Harrisburg Dental Society, and in '52 
received a Certificate of Distinction 
from the National Alumni Association 
for personal merit and professional 
achievement. 

Curtis O. Tyson, ll.b., '04, retired 
Baltimore lawyer, died March 23, 1964, 
following a long illness. He was 83 
years old. 

Dr. William Benjamin Warthen. 
m.d. '05, is retired from the practice of 
medicine and is living in Davisboro, 
Georgia. Dr. Warthen was 83 years 
old in November. 

Charles W. Sylvester, engr. '08, 
who might be described as "the father 
of vocational education in Baltimore," 
died February 4, 1964 at the House-in- 
the-Pines Nursing Home, at the age of 
77. When he became director of voca- 
tional education in 1922, Baltimore's 
only vocational school was located in 
improvised quarters; when he retired 
as assistant in 1956, the system included 
two technical high schools, five tech- 
nical schools at the junior high school 
level and a comprehensive program of 
industrial arts in all secondary schools. 

Frederick Henry Barclay, ll.b. 
'08, Baltimore, died April 13, 1964 at 
his home. 

A. H. Siskind, ll.b. '09, 73, Balti- 
more lawyer, died at his home February 
3, 1964. Mr. Siskind began his career 

(continued on page 21) 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 



I » 









lis 




!■ *■' 



CURTIS BAY T ft W 



*• S- 



m 






MARYLAND 

Her Promise to Her People 





Serenity 

and 

Strength 

The faint reflections 

of the clouded sun 

on the peaceful farmlands 

blaze into a flaming scene 

of power in the steel mills. 



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The Siren's Song 

Water longs for a playmate, 
and Maryland answers the call. 
She sends ships to ply the Bay 
and nymphs to romp on the beaches. 
Even the smallest wood feels 
impelled to host a waterfall. 





A Living Canvas 

Pathways lead the curious 
on pleasant family hikes, 
through the turning leaves 
or into mountain valleys, 
to enjoy the spectacle 
of ever-changing scenes 
which nature paints about. 






V? 


' * i- 


"T*^ 






fca* 










F r I 











'ZJ&Y* 1 




A City Dreams 

What does a city dream of 
when its street lights go on, 
of its harbor and mills 
or its new Civic Center? 
Does it wonder if its blight 
of slums will be cured 
by costly redevelopment? 
Or, is a city a mindless thing 
as blank as the smog it spews? 



Lithographed by 
H. G. Roebuck & Son, Inc. 
Baltimore 18, Maryland 



Through the Years 

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE: 12) 

by managing the first campaign of Rep- 
resentative Charles P. Coady. He was 
a member of the American, Maryland 
and Baltimore City Bar Associations, 
and belonged to the Oheb Shalom Con- 
gregation and the Elks. 

Dr. Howard E. Harman, m.d. 11, 
died at his home in Chillicothe, Ohio 
on December 12, 1963. 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, m.d. '12, 
a Baltimore physician, has been named 
President of the Medical and Chirugi- 
cal Faculty of Maryland. 

Dr. J. Francis Healey, d.d.s. '12, 
Baltimore resident who practiced at 
Highlandtown for more than 40 years, 
died February 17, 1964. 

Carl J. Flom, pharm. '14, who had 
owned and operated an East Baltimore 
drug store for more than 32 years, died 
on May 7, 1964 at his home, at the age 
of 69. 

J. Louis Raap, ll.b. '14, retired 
attorney and a trustee of the Maryland 
Historical Society building fund, died 
at his Baltimore home on January 28, 
1964. Mr. Raap served during World 
War II with the Coast Guard Reserve 
and later became president of the Gar- 
rison Lane Building and Savings As- 
sociation. 

Hooper S. Miles, ll.b. '16, Balti- 
more resident, who served seven con- 
secutive terms as State Treasurer, died 
at his home March 8, 1964. At the time 
of his death, he was chairman of the 
board of the Maryland National Bank, 
Maryland's largest banking firm. He 
also had been active in civic affairs, 
most recently as head of the Metropol- 
itan Area Study Commission, appointed 
by Gov. Tawes. 

Emory H. Niles, ll.b. '17, retired 
chief judge of the Supreme Bench of 
Baltimore, has been elected president 
of the Institute of Judicial Administra- 
tion with its headquarters at the New 
York University School of Law. Judge 
Niles has formerly served as a presi- 
dent of the Maryland State Bar Asso- 
ciation, a former chairman of the sec- 
tion of judicial administration of the 
American Bar Association, and an hon- 
orary fellow of Hertford College, Ox- 
ford University. He is a resident of 
Baltimore. 

Arthur Charles Keefer, agr. '17, 
a former member of the Maryland 
House of Delegates, died February 5, 
1964 at Doctor's Hospital, Washington, 
D.C. A member of local and statewide 
Republican organizations, Mr. Keefer 
was a Mason, a member of the Sigma 
Delta Kappa legal fraternity, and the 
University Club of Washington. He also 
was the first president of the Prince 
Georges County Kiwanis Club. 

Dr. J. Frederick Fehler, d.d.s. '19. 
died March 11, 1964. 

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more resident, an attorney for 45 
years, died on May 14, 1964 after a 
prolonged illness. 

Dr. Cyrus F. Horine, m.d. '19, a 
practicing physician who combined 
teaching, research, inventiveness and 
public service with his 42 years as a 
surgeon, died in Baltimore on February 
26, 1964. Since 1926, Dr. Horine had 
served as Associate Professor of Sur- 
gery at the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine. At the time of his 
death he was medical examiner of the 
Maryland State Police and consultant 
surgeon to the Maryland State Roads 
Commission and the Maryland Train- 
ing School for Boys. 

1920-1929 

Albert G. Leatherman, pharm. 
'20, retired March 31, 1964 after almost 
31 years as a salesman in Baltimore for 
Eli Lilly and Company. 

Argyle N. Finney, educ, '22, a 
district area sales executive with 
Christmas Club Inc., of New York, died 
February 19, 1964. He belonged to Sig- 
ma Nu fraternity. 

Harry O. Yates, agr. '24, Merchant- 
ville. was honored for his outstanding 
service to New Jersey horticulture dur- 
ing New Jersey day at the Philadelphia 
Flower Show. 

Dr. Edgar R. Miller, m.d. '25, of 
Wilmington, Delaware, a Methodist 
layman and chest surgeon who pio- 
neered in helping to set up the first 
Christian medical work in Nepal, has 
been honored by that Asian country. 
The Methodist physician, who has 
treated members of Nepal's royal fam- 
ily, was the first foreigner ever to re- 
ceive a national citation, called "Gor- 
kha Dakstshiva Bahu." 



Charles H. Remsburg, agr. '26. 
Angela Remsburg, 18, the daughter of 
Charles H. Remsburg, Middletown, 
flew to Chicago June 21 to compete for 
three days with 21 other state princes- 
ses for the National Dairy Princess 
honor. Angela, a University of Mary- 
land freshman, is the Maryland Dairy 
Princess. 

John B. Morsell, agr. '26, resi- 
dent of Prince Frederick, Maryland, 
agricultural and civic leader, died 
March 31, 1964 at his home. He was 
past president of the Calvert County 
Board of Education, the Maryland To- 
bacco Co-operative and director of the 
Maryland National Bank, and a County 
Agent for Calvert County. 

Karl Graham Pfeiffer, a&s '26, a 
professor at New York University and 
a Washington native, died in New York 
City March 25, 1964 after a long 
illness. 

Michael F. Delea, ll.b. '26, Balti- 
more attorney, died at his home on 
February 18, 1964. He was a member 
both of the State and City Bar Asso- 
ciations. A former member of the 
Democratic State Central Committee, 
Mr. Delea served on the board of di- 
rectors of the Madison Square Build- 
ing and Loan Association. 

Myron B. Stevens, educ. '27, De- 
partment of the Army patent attorney, 
died May 22, 1964 of a heart attack 
while playing golf in College Park. 
He resided in Bethesda. Known to 
Maryland football fans of the 1920's 
as Mike Stevens, a flashy, drop-kicking 
halfback, he was one of the Univer- 
sity's top athletes, with varsity letters 
in football, baseball, and basketball. 
He was a member of the District of 
Columbia and Maryland Bar Associa- 



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tions. 

Dr. Hiram Upton, m.d. '27, Burling 
ton physician, died February 1, 1964 at 
his home at the age of 61. He was a 
member of Lambda Iota fraternity. 
Phi Sigma Kappa, and Nu Sigma Nu 
medical fraternity; a member of the 
AMA and a member and past presi- 
dent of the Vermont Medical Society. 
1950-51. 

Henry L. McCabe, agr. '27, a re- 
tired employee of the Census Bureau, 
died February 4, 1964 of a heart at- 
tack. He lived in Clinton, Maryland. 

Joseph F. Strohman, mech. engr. 
'28, retired June 30, 1964 as Director, 
Estimates Division, Public Buildings 
Service, General Service Administra- 
tion. 

Harry M. Miller, ll.b. '29, Balti- 
more lawyer, active leader in West 
Coast Zionist organizations, died of a 
heart attack on January 26, 1964. 

Colonel Frederick S. Wolf, m.d. 
'28, Baltimore, Maryland, has completed 
the combat operations course at the 
Air Force Operations School, Hurlburt 
AFB, Florida. 

J. Slater Davidson, Jr., engr. '28, 
has been elected president of the 
Charles H. Tompkins Co., a Washing- 
ton subsidiary of the J. A. Jones Con- 
struction Co. of Charlotte, N. C. He 
was in charge of such projects as The 
Evening Star newspaper plant, Central 
Intelligence Agency building, Langley, 
Virginia, National Security Building at 
Fort Meade and the East Front of the 
Capitol. 

Mrs. Roger S. Whiteford, a&s '29, 
has been named Director of Education 
for the Maryland Academy of Sciences. 
The former Edith Burnside, she re- 
sides in Baltimore, Maryland. 

May-Louise Wood Corder, educ. 
'28, m.a. '35, a teacher in Montgomery 
County schools for more than 35 years, 
died January 22, 1964 at Providence 
Hospital, Washington, D.C. 

1930-1939 

Paul J. Linder, agr. '31, Agriculture 
Department employee and a resident of 
Silver Spring, died on March 21, 1964 
after a long illness. He was a Civil 
Service employee and served as a 
plant physiologist in the Department of 
Agriculture where he studied the ef- 
fects of growth regulating chemicals on 
plants. 

Charles F. Cashell, engr. '31, as- 
sistant chief of the Electrical Depart- 
ment at the U.S. Army Mobility Com- 
mand's Engineer Research and Devel- 
opment Laboratories, Fort Belvoir, 
Virginia, recently received his seventh 
and eighth work performance awards. 

Harry T. Kelly, engr. '34, Colum- 
bia, Ohio building executive, has re- 
turned to the Washington area and has 
been named executive vice-president of 
the Sterling Park Development Corpora- 
tion. 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 



forr 



Arthur H. Bryan, a&s, m.a. '34, 

rmerly Assistant Professor of Bac- 
teriology and Public Health. School of 
Pharmacy, University of Maryland, 
Baltimore, is retiring after 33 years' 
teaching service in Baltimore and 
Florida. 

Dr. William Schofield, ph.d., 
agr. '36, is manager of Purina's Profes- 
sional Services Division of the Veterin- 
ary Department and is known to farm- 
ers everywhere, due to the many 
Purina group meetings he addresses 
each year, emphasizing the importance 
of disease prevention. Dr. Schofield's 
enthusiasm comes from nearly 30 
•• years of poultry disease diagnostic 
work — most of it with Purina. 

William A. Stanton, a&s '36, 
ph.d. '41, director of DuPont's Photo 
Products Research Laboratory in Par- 
lin, New Jersey, has been appointed to 
the newly-created position of product 
marketing manager in the Photo Prod- 
ucts Department. 

Mrs. John Taylor Fisher, a&s '36, 
the former Rebecca Charlotte Miller, 
of Washington, D.C., died in Indianap- 
olis February 19, 1964. 

Bernard Graeves, a&s '37, is a 
Colonel with the United States Army 
and is currently Commanding Officer 
of Letterkenny Army Depot, Cham- 
bersburg, Pennsylvania, one of the 
largest installations in the U. S. Army 
Supply and Maintenance Command. 

Miss Mary Washington Frazer, 
agr. '37, Nashville, Tennessee resident, 
was the recipient of an award by the 
AAUW Educational Foundation College 
Faculty Program. Miss Frazer will 
study Spanish under the program. 

Robert A. Jackson, engr. '37, has 
recently been appointed one of three 
district sales managers of the Chicago 
Bridge and Iron Company, world-wide 
metal plate fabricating and construc- 
tion firm. 

John J. McCarthy, a&s '38, Wash- 
ington real estate and savings and loan 
executive, died at the Georgetown Uni- 
versity Hospital January 15, 1964 after 
a long illness. He was a member of 
the board of directors and vice presi- 
dent of the Home Building Association 
and vice president of Woodward and 
Norris. At Maryland, in 1939, he was 
selected first-string end on an all- 
Maryland football team. 

Dr. Robert C. Sheppard, m.d. '38, 
surgeon for Spring Grove State Hos- 
pital and a member of the medical de- 
partment of Western Electric Com- 
pany, resident of Catonsville, 
Maryland, died April 26, 1964. He was 
a member of the Medical and Chirurgi- 
cal Faculty of Maryland, a fellow of 
the American College of Surgeons, the 
American Medical Association, and the 
American College of Surgeons. 

Jerome S. Hardy, bpa '39, has been 
named publisher of Life magazine. 
Mr. Hardy at one time did public rela- 



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tions work for the automobile industry 
in Washington. 

1940-1949 

Major Charles W. Weidinger, 
educ. '40, died on June 5, 1964, at Fort 
Knox, Kentucky. While at Maryland, 
he was a pitcher on the baseball team 
and a quarterback on the football 
team. 

J. Lee Smith, ll.b. '42, a Catons- 
ville attorney who once served as Bal- 
timore County magistrate, died Janu- 
ary 23, 1964, of a heart attack. 

Seymour D. Wolf, engr. '42, presi- 
dent of the Engineering Alumni Coun- 
cil, University of Maryland, 1964-65, 
received a master's degree in business 
education from American University 
this spring, after eight years of night 
school. Making graduation this year a 
family affair, Mrs. Wolf received a 
bachelor's degree in education, also 
from American University; 17-year-old 
Douglas graduated from Fork Union 
Military Academy in Virginia; and 11- 
year-old Deborah and 14-year-old Beth 
accepted diplomas from Rollingwood 
Elementary School and Leland Junior 
High School, both in Chevy Chase, 
Maryland, where the Wolfs make their 
home. 

Professor Robert M. Rivello, 
engr. '43, has been cited as one of the 
outstanding AIAA faculty advisors of 
the American Institute of Aeronautics 
and Astronautics. The citation was in 
recognition of the outstanding interest 
he has shown in, and guidance he has 
given to, the AIAA student branch at 
the University of Maryland. 

A. Budd Cutler, bpa '43, attorney, 
received recognition for his three years 
of service as president of the YMCA 
of Miami, Florida, and has been in- 
stalled in the position of Honorary 
President. 

J. David Lambert, mech. engr. '45, 
recently was transferred to the Com- 
putation Center of Sun Oil Company 
where he is in training to be a com- 
puter programmer. He was formerly 
a Technical Writer in Sun's Industrial 
Advertising Department. 

SlGMUND GROLLMAN, A&S '47, M.S. 

'49, ph.d. '52, Associate Professor in 
the Department of Zoology at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, is the author of 
the book, The Human Body: It's Struc- 
ture and Function, published May 1 1 by 
Macmillan. The native of Stevensville, 
Maryland, has been a Research Fellow 
of the American Physiological Society 
and The National Institute of Health. 
He has also served as vice-president of 
the American Society of Professional 
Biologists, and is a member of the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. 

M. E. Stambaugh, agr. '47, of North 
Kansas City, Missouri, has been named 
district manager for Armour Agricul- 



Students Supply Store 

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24 



the Maryland Magazine 



tural Chemical Company in Baltimore, 
Maryland. 

Edward M. Rider, a&s '47, Chevy 
Chase, Maryland, was elected presi- 
dent of the Institute of Shortening and 
Edible Oils, Inc. Formerly executive 
director of the National Vitamin and 
Drug Association, he has also been as- 
sociated with the National Canners As- 
sociation and the National Association 
of Margarine Manufacturers. He is 
also a member of the National Press 
Club and the Washington Trade Asso- 
ciation Executives. At Maryland, he was 
president of Omicron Delta Kappa and 
Editor-in-Chief of the Dianwndhack. 

George H. Rosedom, ll.b. '48, the 
first Negro Assistant State's Attorney 
in Maryland history, died February 
28, 1964, of a heart attack. Before he 
became Assistant State's Attorney, he 
had been a social worker, parole offi- 
cer and probation officer. He was a 
member of Omega Psi Psi fraternity, 
the Y.M.C.A., and the Monumental 
and Baltimore City Bar Associations. 

John C. Bouma, b.s. '48, m.s. '49, 
Hyattsville, Maryland, was awarded the 
Superior Service Award at the 18th An- 
nual Honor Awards Ceremony at the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. 

Lieutenant Colonel Robert T. 
Duff, educ. '48, graduated June 5, 
1964, from the Air War College, the 
U.S. Air Force's senior professional 
school, at the Air University, Maxwell 
AFB, Alabama. 

1949-1959 

Anthony M. Johnson, engr. '50, 
has been named marketing manager of 
Korad Corporation, Santa Monica, 
California. 

Kenneth N. Ports, engr. '50, has 
been promoted to lieutenant colonel at 
Headquarters Fourth U.S. Army, Fort 
Sam Houston in San Antonio, Texas. 

Gerald S. Kantorow, pharm. '50, 
has joined the Washington, D.C., sales 
force of Eli Lilly and Company. He 
previously served from 1950 to 1952 as 
a medical supply officer in the United 
States Army and earned a law degree 
from Georgetown University in 1955. 

Robert M. Burton, a&s '50, has 
been promoted to Associate Professor 
of Pharmacology at Washington Uni- 
versity School of Medicine, St. Louis, 
Missouri. He has been a member of 
the faculty since 1957. 

Robert B. Doty, a&s '50, has been 
appointed to the staff of the Depart- 
ment of Microbiology, Pennsylvania 
State University, as an Assistant Pro- 
fessor. 

Leonard C. Wright, a&s '51, has 
been appointed director of program 
management for Melpar, Inc. He will 
be responsible for cost and schedule 
performance on contracts handled by 
the company. 

(continued on page 27) 




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15 



Craig Fisher 
will Produce 
NBC-TV 
News Feature 



the news and public affairs depart- 
ment. He was associate producer on 
the "Woman" series, which won a Syl- 
vania Award and on "The Right Man" 
program devoted to presidential cam- 
paigns. 

Mr. Fisher is married to the former 
Elva Paul, Educ, '54, of Washington. 
They live in Westchester County, New 
York, with their two children, Cathleen 
and Dean. 



Subscribe to 



MARYLAND MAGAZINE 



CRAIG FISHER, A&S '54, HAS BEEN 
named producer of "Sunday," an 
NBC News magazine-format television 
series which will start Sunday, October 
27, on the NBC-TV Network from 4 to 
5 p.m. EST. 

With this new assignment, Mr. Fish- 
er, who also produces "Exploring," 
will be in charge of two hour-long pro- 
grams each week for the network. 

Mr. Fisher, 31, is a former associate 
producer of the NBC-TV "Today" pro- 
gram who, in 1962, was asked to devel- 
op a children's program for NBC. The 
result was "Exploring," which in its 
first season won a George Foster Pea- 
body Award as "an outstanding TV 
series for youth and children; a Thom- 
as Alva Edison Foundation Award as 
"best children's television program," 
and a first-place award given by the 
Institute for Education by Radio-Tele- 
vision of Ohio State University. 

The citation accompanying the Pea- 
body Award noted that "With taste, 
wisdom and imagination, 'Exploring' 
opens new vistas to the child viewer." 
The Ohio State Award was won in the 
Fine Arts and Humanities category. 
The citation read: "The 'Exploring' 
series could compete successfully in 
several categories, but in the Fine Arts 
and Humanities, this particular pro- 
gram is outstanding. Skillful selection 
of host, subject matter and visual ma- 
terials are thoughtfully combined in a 
presentation paced so that the program 
is both fascinating and instrumental 
for young people." 

In the 1962-63 season, "Exploring" 
used a "theme object" — a piece of 
string or a lump of coal, for example 
— to unite the six major areas of learn- 
ing it covered. Instead of these ob- 
jects, a person or a group of people 
will connect the various segments dur- 
ing the coming season. 

"Our basic aim will remain the same, 
however," Mr. Fisher said. "We will 
attempt to stimulate rather than edu- 
cate. We hope that children watching 
our program will ask 'why?' and then 
will go to their parents, their teacher 
or their library to find more informa- 
tion about whatever whets their curi- 
osity." 

Prior to joining NBC, Mr. Fisher was 
with CBS in New York as an associate 
producer, film director and writer in 



Thomas Wilson Assumes Presidency 

of the Federal 

Communications Bar Association 



THOMAS W. WILSON, ENGR. '34, 
was recently appointed President of 
the Federal Communications Bar As- 
sociation for the year 1964-1965. 

A graduate of the Georgetown Law 
School, Mr. Wilson has been practicing 
law in Washington, D. C. since 1938. 
He is now one of the senior partners in 
the law firm of Dow, Lohnes and Al- 
bertson, probably the oldest Washing- 
ton firm specializing in radio-television 
and communications law. Mr. Wilson, 
in charge of communications practice, 
oversees a dozen lawyers who special- 
ize in communications law, primarily 
broadcasting. 

Mr. Wilson received a degree in 
civil engineering from the University 
of Maryland and worked at that pro- 
fession while attending law school at 
night. A professor suggested that he 
study law when Mr. Wilson discovered 
that finding a job in the civil engineer- 
ing field was more difficult than he 
expected. While studying at George- 
town, he was employed at the U. S. 
Coast & Geodetic Survey and the U. S. 
Corps of Engineers. 

Mr. Wilson was active in the legal 
fraternity, Delta Theta Phi, while at 
Georgetown University, and served as 
head of his local chapter and also 
"chancellor" of the Washington region. 
At that time, the late Horace Lohnes 
was national chancellor of the frater- 
nity, and, when Mr. Wilson obtained 
his law degree, he asked Mr. Lohnes 
for a recommendation. Mr. Lohnes 
wrote the recommendation and then de- 
cided he wanted Mr. Wilson to stay 
with his own firm. 

One of the first assignments Mr. Wil- 
son handled was helping Mr. Lohnes 
and Fred Albertson in their work on 
the FCC's 1944-45 radio spectrum allo- 
cation review. Their firm represented 
Major Edwin H. Armstrong, who in- 
vented FM. 

Mr. Wilson has served on numerous 




committees dealing with his law prac- 
tice and his community. He is a mem- 
ber of the finance committee of the 
Republican County Committee of 
Montgomery County, Maryland; the 
Board of Governors, (and past presi- 
dent) of the Western Bethesda Planning 
Association; the American Bar Associ- 
ation; the District of Columbia Bar As- 
sociation; the Federal Communications 
Bar Association; National Lawyers 
Club; Broadcasters Club; Congressional 
Country Club; and Edgemoor Club. He 
is a vestryman at St. John's Church, 
Norwood Parish (Episcopal). 

Mr. Wilson is a native of Washington. 
D.C. and now lives in Bethesda, Mary- 
land. He is a tennis player of local re- 
nown, a sailing and golfing enthusiast, 
and is presently taking flying lessons. 

He is married to the former Nancy 
Webber and they have three children: 
Anne, 20; Marcia, 15; and Thomas, Jr. 
10. 



26 



the Maryland Magazine 



Through the Years 

(CONTINUHD FROM PAGh 25) 

Harold V. Maull, u.c. '52, former 
Air Force officer, has ventured into the 
realm of politics. The first Air Force 
officer at Maryland, he has heen 
elected Mayor of Boca Raton, Palm 
Beach County, Florida. He announces 
that plans have heen approved for the 
establishment of a state university in 
Boca Raton. 

George W. Scott, engr. '52, Os- 
wego, New York, has been appointed an 
advisory engineer in ASQ-28 Magnetic 
Drum Memory Development at IBM's 
Space Guidance Center in Owego. 

Walter J. Blaha, engr. '52, has 
been transferred and promoted to 
Plant Supervisor, Carbon Plant, in the 
Activated Carbon Division at the Nev- 
ille Island Plant of Pittsburgh Chemi- 
cal Company. He was formerly Pro- 
duction Supervisor at the Division's 
Big Sandy Plant, Catlettsburg, Ken- 
tucky. 

Captain Robert M. Maccallum, 
a&s '52, of South Orange, New Jersey, 
arrived for duty at Sembach AB, Ger- 
many, with a unit of the United States 
Air Forces in Europe. He received his 
commission upon graduation at Mary- 
land, where he was a member of Theta 
Chi. 

Herbert P. Stutts, agr. '52, m.s. 
'57, is serving as Placement Director at 
American University in Washington, 
DC. 

Thomas E. Long, ll.b. '52, has 
been promoted to Regional Marketing 
and Distribution Manager of the 
Kansas City, Missouri, division of the 
American Oil Company. 

Captain Robert Campello, jr., 
bpa '52, is participating in Exercise Air 
Boon Choo, a Southeast Asia Treaty 
Organization military training operation 
being staged in Thailand. Captain 
Campello is an intelligence officer with 
Headquarters, Thirteenth Air Force at 
Clark AB, Philippines. His unit will 
provide tactical support for the joint 
U.S. -Thailand- Australia-New Zealand- 
United Kingdom operation. 

Dr. Robert N. Headley, a&s '56, 
m.d. '56, has been promoted from In- 
structor to Assistant Professor of Med- 
icine at the Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Caro- 
lina. 

Dr. Edgar Allan Day, agr. '53, re- 
ceived the Institute of Food Technolo- 
gists award for research at the annual 
meeting of the Institute May 24-28. The 
award, which consisted of an honarium 
of $1,000 and a plaque, was given to 
"recognize research scientists who 
have demonstrated outstanding ability 
in research in some area of food 
science and technology." 

Lieutenant Colonel Dante E. 
Bulli, mil. sci. '53, has been 

May-June, 1964 



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awarded the United States Air Force 
Commendation Medal for his meritor- 
ious achievement as chief of the stand- 
ardization division of the 99th Bombard- 
ment Wing at Westover AFB, Massa- 
chusetts. He presently is a student at 
the Air War College at Maxwell AFB, 
Alabama. 

Captain Lawrence D. Conway jr., 
bpa '53, San Francisco, California, has 
graduated from the course for U.S. Air 
Force air armament officers at Lowry 
AFB, Colorado. 

Captain Ernest B. Milligan, a&s 
'54, an Air Force reserve pilot, died 
April 18, 1964, in a collision of two 
C-119 troop carriers over Ohio. While 
at Maryland, he was active as presi- 
dent of Gymkana and a member of the 
freshmen baseball team. 

Daniel B. Lyons, bpa '54, has been 
named manager of operations and 
traffic. Greyhound Van Lines, Inc., 
Greyhound's Chicago-based nationwide 
moving and storage subsidiary. 

Dr. John J. McGonigle, m.d. '54, 
is one of the 22 physicians to enter 
the residency program at Mary Hitch- 
cock Memorial Hospital, N.H. He will 
begin postgraduate work as a specialist 
in dermatology. He has previously 
served as surgical resident at St. Vin- 
cent Hospital, New Hampshire, and 
Boston City Hospital. 

Robert Lee Willoughby, bpa '54, 
has been appointed a local agent in the 
Richmond office of the State Farm Mu- 
tual Automobile Insurance Company. 

Edmond F. McKeown, jr., bpa '54, 
formerly Assistant United States At- 
torney for the District of Columbia, is 
presently Regulatory Attorney for the 
United Air Lines, Inc. Mr. McKeown 
resides in Chicago, Illinois and on Au- 
gust 31, 1963 was married to Miss 
Barbara S. Mundt. 

Captain William R. Kenty, a&s 
'54, College Park, Maryland, is par- 
ticipating in Exercise Delawar, a joint 
Iranian-U.S. military training operation 
being staged in Iran. The captain's 
unit will help provide tactical air sup- 
port for the exercise. 

David H. Sudderth, jr., m.s. '54, 
was promoted to lieutenant colonel, 
April 22, 1964, while attending the reg- 
ular courses at the U.S. Army Com- 
mand and General Staff College at 
Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Herbert J. Winegar, ll.b. '54, 
formerly patent attorney, Western Elec- 
tric Company's Engineering Research 
Center, Princeton, New Jersey, has been 
promoted to International Patent At- 
torney. He is a member of the New 
York Patent Law Association and Eta 
Kappa Nu, the electrical engineer's na- 
tional honor society. 

John H. Guender, a&s '54, has been 
promoted to Supervising Service Fore- 
man, Wilmington Operations, in the 
Bell Telephone Company of Pennsyl- 
vania. 



Captain Charles E. Pugh, u.c. '54.1 
of Pompano Beach, Florida, partici-i) 
pated in the Air Defense Commandjl 
weapons system evaluation project atlj 
U.S. Air Force base at Tyndall, Florida.! 

Colonel Woodrow A. Abbott. I 
mil. sci. '55, has been presented thei 
first Oak Leaf Cluster to the United 
States Air Force Commendation Medal 
at March AFB, California. He was 
awarded the medal for his meritoriou'- 
achievement while serving as deputy 
commander for operations at Schilling 
AFB, Kansas. 

Major Leonard M. Winter, u.c. 
'55, was graduated from the associate 
course at the U.S. Army Command 
and General Staff College, Fort 
Leavenworth, Kansas, May 8, 1964. 
Major Winter is scheduled to be as- 
signed to Headquarters, Seventh U.S. 
Army, Comptroller in Germany. 

Captain William H. Sanders, bpa 
'55, is commander of the missile launch 
crew selected as the Outstanding Crew 
of the Quarter for the 851st Strategic 
Missile Squardon at Beale AFB. Cali- 
fornia. 

Robert L. Minor, agr. '56, Wash- 
ington, D.C., has been named director 
of the European office of Tobacco As- 
sociates in Brussels, Belgium. He 
formerly was executive secretary of 
the Burley and Dark Leaf Tobacco Ex- 
port Association and the National Cigar 
Leaf Association. 

Major Alfred A. Paradise, u.c. 
'56, is now on duty with a United States 
Air Force advisory unit, assisting the 
armed forces of Viet Nam in their 
fight against Communist aggression. 

Aubrey W. Gammill, bpa '56, has 
been named manager of the office ad- 
ministration department at the Travel- 
ers Insurance Companies' Lubbock. 
Connecticut office. 

Kenneth M. Howard, Jr., engr. 
'56, M. engr. '60, has joined the Space 
Engineering Laboratory of Aero Geo 
Astro Corporation in College Park. 
Maryland as a technical advisor on 
space activities. He is a member of 
the Institute of Electrical and Elec- 
tronics Engineers and several honor- 
ary societies. 

Joseph J. Honick, bpa '56, has 
been named Assistant Association Man- 
ager for the Institute of Industrial 
Launderers, Inc. The Washington- 
based organization is the trade asso- 
ciation for the $400 million a year in- 
dustry which provides uniforms and 
dust control systems on a rental basis. 
He is chairman of the Education Com- 
mittee of the Washington Chapter of 
the Public Relations Society of 
America; Sigma Delta Chi, profes- 
sional Journalism society, and a mem- 
ber of the District of Columbia Urban 
Renewal Council and the National 
Press Club. 

Lyman Harwood Frasier, engr. 



28 



the Maryland Magazine 



: 



6, Rockvillc, Maryland, died in Jaiui- 
ry of 1964. 
Colonel William W. Berg, mil. 

sci. '56, Deputy Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Military Personnel Policy, 
was recently promoted to Brigadier 
General in the Air Force following con- 
firmation by the U.S. Senate. 

Donald E. Carruth, engr. '57, man- 
ager, Digital Command Department of 
Litton Systems Inc., has been appointed 
to be GSA Program Manager of West- 
ern Union. The new GSA network, 
with 1600 out-stations, will be the sec- 
ond largest Western Union private wire 
system, out-ranked by its AUTODIN 
system serving the Department of De- 
fense. 

John Paul Warfiei.d, agr. '57, and 
Philip Donald Ates, bpa '59, have 
been appointed local agents of the 
State Farm Mutual Automobile Insur- 
ance Company in Charlottesville, Vir- 
ginia. 

Roger D. Redden, ll.b. '57, Balti- 
more attorney, has been appointed an 
Assistant Attorney General of Mary- 
land. An associate in the law firm of 
Smith, Somerville, and Case, he is also 
an elected member of the Junior Bar 
Association of Baltimore City's Execu- 
tive Committee. 

J. B. Waters, phy. educ. '57, a Pro- 
fessional Service Representative in the 
Lancaster, Pennsylvania, area for the 
pharmaceutical firm of Smith Kline 
and French Laboratories since 1958, 
has been transferred to the position of 
Hospital Service Representative in the 
Albany, New York, area. 

Lieutenant Colonel Michael P. 
Bogda, Jr., u.c. '57, Greenwich, Con- 
necticut, has assumed the position of 
executive officer of the 3500th Air Base 
Group at Reese AFB, Texas. Previ- 
ously he was awarded the Distin- 
guished Flying Cross and the Air 
Medal with seven Oak Leaf Clusters. 

Dr. Gerald P. Brierly, a&s '53, 
ph.d. '61, a biochemist and Assistant 
Professor at the Enzyme Institute, 
Madison, Wisconsin for the past three 
years, has accepted an Investigatorship 
with the American Heart Association at 
Madison. 

Ronald H. Brierly, engr. '58, 
chemical engineer with Monsanto 
Chemicals, Texas City, Texas for the 
past five years, is now employed by 
the C. F. Braun and Company. Al- 
hambra, California. 

Frederick Billig, engr., m.a. '58, 
of the Johns Hopkins University 
Applied Physics Laboratory, Silver 
Spring, Maryland, received a Doctor of 
Philosophy degree in mechanical engi- 
neering from the University of Mary- 
land. His doctoral paper dealt with 
combustion in supersonic streams, also 
his field of study as supervisor of the 
hypersonic ramjet project at the lab- 
oratory. 

Carlos M. Garza, mil. sci. '58. San 



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29 




HOW 

SUCCESSFUL 

ARE 

YOU? 



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want to do . . . knowing that you do it 
well . . . and reaping certain tangible 
rewards in the process 

How successful are you? If you're an en- 
gineer on a treadmill ... if you're not 
working on the sort of projects that inter- 
est you most ... if you feel that your 
special abilities and experience are being 
wasted ... if you're not satisfied with the 
salary you're making or feel hemmed in 
with restrictions . . . then it looks like a 
change is in order. 

Let's talk about you and a future with 
Westinghouse. Here are stimulating as- 
signments in molecular electronics, bi- 
onics, optical physics, LASER, advanced 
weapons systems and dozens of challeng- 
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Hopkins, Maryland or George Washing- 
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house . . . "The engineer's company." 

To arrange an interview call 

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or send resume to: 

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Aerospace BALTIMORE 

lyslems P °- Box 1693 

Underseas Baltimore, Md. 21203 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



Antonio, Texas, was promoted to lieu- 
tenant colonel, March 2, 1964 while 
serving as research and development 
coordinator in Headquarters, U.S. 
Armv Material Command. Washington, 
DC. 

Captain Charles M. Walther jr. 
bpa '58, has been selected by his class- 
mates as the most outstanding speaker 
in the current 800-man graduating 
class at the United States Air Force 
Squadron Officer School at Maxwell Air 
Force Base, Alabama. 

Captain William F. Sanford jr., 
engr. '58, has arrived for duty with an 
Air Force Systems Command unit at 
Norton AFB, California. Captain San- 
ford, a mechanical engineer, previously 
served at Davis-Monthan AFB, Arizona. 
His new unit supports the AFSC mis- 
sion of research, development and test- 
ing of Air Force planes and missile 
systems. 

Mr. and Mrs. Houston G. Ingram, 
bpa '58, a&s '59, recently had a baby 
girl, Ellen Todd, who was born on May 
I, 1963. Mr. Ingram is employed as a 
Texaco Sales Representative in the 
New York division. The couple reside 
in Danbury, Connecticut. 

Harold M. Zoslow, bpa '59, has 
been appointed a vice president of Mar- 
vin J. Gerstein advertising and public 
relations agency. He has been serving 
as an account executive in the firm in 
Washington, D.C. Previously, he was 
with Jerry Litchtman and Co., New 
York, and the Wall Street Journal. 

Lieutenant Colonel MacCowan 
Newman, cscs '59, Special Assistant 
on Budgetary Matters to the Army 
Surgeon General's Comptroller, re- 
ceived his new insignia of full Colonel 
during a promotion ceremony held in 
February of 1964. 

Virgil H. Marsh, engr. '59, form- 
erly of College Park, Maryland, joined 
the staff of the Du Pont Company's 
Photo Products Department Research 
Laboratory at Parlin, New Jersey, on 
March 30, 1964. 

Lieutenant Colonel Harold E. 
Howard, cscs '59, of Little Rock, Ar- 
kansas, has completed the combat op- 
erations course at the Air Force Air- 
Ground Operations School at Hurlburt 
Field, Florida. Colonel Howard is di- 
rector of operations for the Western 
Hemisphere Division at Headquarters, 
Nineteenth Air Force, Seymour John- 
son AFB, North Carolina. 

Lieutenant Colonel Roy F. 
Marsden, u.c. '59, of Pasadena, Cali- 
fornia, recently returned to McClellan 
AFB, California, after participating in 
Operation Krazy Kat, an inflight navi- 
gational air mission. Colonel Marsden 
is a pilot on an Air Defense Command 
EC-121D Warning Star aircraft. He 
helped provide navigation assistance to 
23 F-102 aircraft returning from 
Europe to the U.S. across the North 
Atlantic. 



THE SIXTIES 

Dr. Walter C. Lesky, m.d. '60, a 
new doctor in Hagerstown, Maryland, 
began practice in January of 1964. He 
is associated with Drs. Richard Young 
and A. Maynard Bacon. He is a mem- 
ber of the Baltimore City Medical So- 
ciety and the Medical Chirurgical 
Faculty of Maryland. 

Joseph P. Pannitto, u.c. '60, of 
New York, has been promoted to chief 
master sergeant in the United States 
Air Force. The Sergeant is assigned to 
the 18th Communications Squadron as 
a radio equipment superintendent at 
Westover AFB. Massachusetts. 

Colonel Jack C. White, u.c. '60, 
of Macon, Georgia, has completed the 
combat operations course at the Air 
Force Air-Ground Operations School at 
Hurlburt Field, Florida. Colonel White 
is chief of the Strategic Air Warfare 
Division at Headquarters, Tactical Air 
Command, Langley AFB, Virginia. 

Edward Allen Shepherd jr., educ. 
'60, has been appointed a field claim 
representative in the Suitland. Mary- 
land office of the State Farm Mutual 
Automobile Insurance Company. He is 
a resident of Hyattsville, Maryland. 

Jack Zane, bpa '60, former member 
of the University of Maryland Athletic 
Department, is currently working as 
Sports Publicity Director, George 
Washington University, Washington, 
D.C. 

Lieutenant Colonel Robert T. 
Simpson, u.c. '60, of Hampton, Vir- 
ginia, is participating in Exercise 
Delawar, a joint Iranian-U.S. military 
training operation being staged in Iran. 
Colonel Simpson is director of opera- 
tions for the Tactical Air Command's 
463rd Troop Carrier Wing at Langley 
AFB, Virginia. 

First Lieutenant Theodore F. 
Kyte jr., educ. '60, of Baltimore, has 
returned to Cannon AFB, New Mexico, 
after participating in Exercise Match 
Point, the Tactical Air Command 
aerial firepower competition at Hurlburt 
AFB, Florida. 

Lieutenant Colonel Harry R. 
Dexter, u.c. '60, of Maysville, Califor- 
nia, has arrived for duty with a unit of 
the Pacific Air Forces at Osan AB. 
Korea. His new unit supports the 
PACAF mission of providing airpower 
for defense of the U.S. and its allies in 
the Pacific area. 

Major Kalman D. Simon, u.c. '60, 
of Tulsa, Oklahoma, helps monitor the 
missile launch equipment of a Titan II 
weapon system at a hardened missile 
site in Kansas. Major Simon is com- 
mander of a Strategic Air Command 
(SAC) combat-ready missile crew at 
the control center. 

Wesi by I. Sautfr, educ. '55, m.ed. 
'60, a youth leader and guidance coun- 
selor in the Montgomery County School 
System, died of cancer March I I, 1964 



30 



the Maryland Magazine 



at Suburban Hospital, Baltimore. He 
was active in the Fourth Presbyterian 
Church at Bethesda, the Montgomery 
County Boys Baseball Association, The 
Boy Scouts, YMCA. He began his 
teaching career at the Takoma Park 
Junior High School in 1955. and in 1959 
he became a guidance counselor at 
Montgomery Hills Junior High School 
in Silver Spring. He is survived by his 
mother and two brothers. Mr. Sauter 
was 31 years old. 

Barbara Kay Keller, a&s '61, of 
Baltimore, has received a graduate 
award in psychology at Bryn Mawr 
College, Pennsylvania, for study during 
the year 1964-65. 

Maurice Barkley, a&s '61, was ap- 
pointed technical director of market 
reports and special tabulations. Mr. 
Barkley, a speech major at Maryland, 
is currently working on a graduate pro- 
gram in radio and television. He and 
his wife, the former Joan McKeown, 
h.e.c. '61, live in Laurel, Maryland with 
their two children. 

Howard S. Chasanow, a&s '60, 
ll.b. '61, has been named the first 
Deputy State's Attorney for Prince 
George's County, effective June 1, 1964. 
He earned his ll.m. in '62 from Har- 
vard University. 

Second Lieutenant Ronald W. 
Byers, a&s '61, Columbia, South Caro- 
lina, completed an eight-week officer 
orientation course at the Army In- 
fantry School, Fort Benning, Georgia. 
March 10, 1964. 

Major Wayne Musgrove, u.c. '61, 
of Texarkana, Texas, is now on duty 
with a United States Air Force advisory 
unit assisting the armed forces of Viet 
Nam in their fight against Communist 
aggression. Major Musgrove, a pilot, 
and other USAF personnel train and 
assist Vietnamese Air Force person- 
nel in mastering various technical spe- 
cialties necessary for maintaining 
modern military units. 

William L. Hopkins, Jr., engr. 
'61, was married on February 29, 1964, 
to Miss Nancy Heydt of Paradise Falls, 
Pennsylvania. Mr. Hopkins is em- 
ployed by Jersey Central Power & 
Light Company in Morristown, New 
Jersey. He was a member of Alpha 
Tau Omega. 

Lieutenant Colonel Norman W. 
Pinney, Jr., u.c. '61, of Cortez, Flor- 
ida, was among a select group of Air 
Force and Air National Guard officers 
who attended the eastern regional con- 
ference of the Ground Electronics En- 
gineering-Installation Agency at Brook- 
ley AFB, Alabama. Colonel Piney is 
commander of the 281st Ground Elec- 
tronics Engineering — Installation at 
Olmsted AFB, Pennsylvania. 

Second Lieutenant James A. 
Ryan, educ. '61, of Washington, D.C., 
has completed the United States Air 
Force special training course for com- 
bat crew members at Castle AFB, Cal- 



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May-June, 1964 



31 



ifornia. Lieutenant Ryan, a KC-135 
Stratotanker navigator, is being as- 
signed to the 914th Air Refueling 
Squadron at Blytheville. Arkansas. 

Vincent D. Limaurd, a&s '61, of 
l.\nn. Massachusetts, has been com- 
missioned a second lieutenant in the 
United States Air Force upon gradua- 
tion from Officer Training School at 
lackland AFB. Texas. 

Lieutenant Colonel E. Asa 
Bates, Jr., u.c. '62, Montclair, New 
Jersey, had been decorated with the first 
Oak Leaf Cluster to the United States 
Air Force Commendation Medal at 
Maxwell AFB, Alabama. Colonel Bates 
received the medal for his meritorious 
service as organizational planning of- 
ficer for Headquarters, USAF. He is 
now a student at The Air University's 
Air War College on base. 

Colonel John A. C. Andrews, 
a&s '62, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
has arrived at Scott AFB, Illinois to as- 
sume the position as chief of the intel- 
ligence division with the Military Air 
Transport Service. Prior to this assign- 
ment, Colonel Andrews was comman- 
der of Hahn AB, Germany. 

Captain Leland R. McGinness, 
u.c. '62, of Maryville, Missouri, grad- 
uated from the United States Air 
Force's Squadron Officer School at 
the Air University at Maxwell AFB, 
Alabama. 

Claude Otis Barnhill, u.c. '62, 
Oakland, California, died on April 28, 
1964, as a result of an injury received 
in a jeep accident in the Philippines on 
April 14, 1964. 

First Lieutenant Richard D. 
Switzer, bpa '62, Springfield, Pennsyl- 
vania, is being reassigned to L. G. Han- 
scom Field, Massachusetts, following 
his graduation from the course for U.S. 
Air Force accounting and finance of- 
ficers at Sheppard AFB, Texas. 

Lieutenant Colonel John H. 
Statts, u.c. '62, of King of Prussia, 
Pennsylvania, was decorated with U.S. 
Air Force Commendation Medal at Dy- 
ess AFB, Texas. Colonel Statts was 
awarded the medal for meritorious serv- 
ice as commander of the Tactical Air 
Command's 17th Troop Carrier at Dy- 
ess. 

First Lieutenant Jon B. Parker, 
Educ. '62 of Silver Spring, Maryland, 
is in the field with U. S. Air Force 
Military Air Transport airlift units now 
engaged in Exercise Desert Strike be- 
ing conducted by U.S. Strike Command. 
The realistic combat operation is the 
largest joint air-ground training maneu- 
ver in the southwestern states since 
World War II. 

Lieutenant Colonel Eldon N. 
Colby, u.c. '62, of South Gate, Cali- 
fornia, graduated June 5. 1964 from the 
Air War College, the U.S. Air Force's 
senior professional school, at the Air 
University, Maxwell AFB, Alabama. 
Bernard Joseph McKenna, a&s '62, 



received the degree of Master of Arts 
in History from Pennsylvania State 
University in June of 1964. 

Walter G. Schweitzer, ph.d. '62, a 
physicist in the Spectroscopy Section of 
the Atomic Physics Division of the Na- 
tional Bureau of Standards, was pre- 
sented a Silver Medal Meritorious Serv- 
ice Award recently at the 1 6th Annual 
Awards Program of the Department 
of Commerce. He received his award 
"For outstanding research on the de- 
velopment of new and precise wave- 
length standards, and for the very pre- 
cise measurement of the hyperfine 
structure of mercury." 

George Hronek, engr. '63, is pres- 
ently assigned to the TFX project in 
the Fort Worth-Texas division of Gen- 
eral Dynamics Corporation. 

Lieutenant Commander Raymond 
Allen Wilkinson, u.c. '63, died 
of a cerebral hemorrhage on March 1 . 
1964, in Landstohn, Germany, while 
visiting there with his wife. He was 
stationed in Paris with the U.S. Navy. 

Captain John J. Abele, u.c. '63, 
participated in Exercise Delawar, a 
joint Iranian-U.S. military training op- 
eration staged in Iran during the month 
of April, 1964. Captain Abele is an Air 
Force pilot with a Tactical Air Com- 
mand unit at Sewart AFB, Tennessee. 

Charles Edward Stoner, a&s '63, 
has been appointed field property claim 
representative in the Washington office 
of the State Farm Mutual Automobile 
Insurance Company. He is a resident 
of Bladensburg, Maryland. 

Robert W. Henderson, pharm. 
'63, has joined the Baltimore sales force 
of Eli Lilly and Company. He is a 
member of the American Pharmaceu- 
tical Association. 

Robert E. Hendrix, engr. '63, has 
been selected by Westinghouse to at- 
tend the Advanced Design School, a 
program conducted for young inexperi- 
enced engineers who have shown high 
potential in technical areas. The cur- 
riculum encompasses both electrical 
and mechanical engineering studies at 
the graduate level. 

Second Lieutenant Thomas F. 
King, bpa '63, of Libertytown, Mary- 
land, has entered United States Air 
Force pilot training at Laredo AFB, 
Texas. 

Gerald B. Sabo, a&s '63, of College 
Park, Maryland, has been commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in the United 
States Air Force upon graduation from 
Officer Training School at Lackland 
AFB, Texas. He is being reassigned 
to Lowry AFB, Colorado for training 
as an avionics officer. 

Harold G. Wiegland Jr., bpa '63, 
of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, has been 
commissioned a second lieutenant in the 
United States Air Force upon gradua- 
tion from Officer Training at Lackland 
AFB, Texas. He is a member of Lamb- 
da Chi Alpha. 



Directory of Advertisers 



Acme I run Works i _ 

Alcazar 24 

American Disinfectant Co ]i 

Anchor Post Products Co., Inc 24 

Aristocrat Linen Supply Co., Inc 24 

Arundel Federal Savings & Loan Assn. ... _" 

Baltimore Check Room Service 3) 

Bard Avon School 23 

Bayshore Foods, Inc lo 

Benjamin E. Beavin Co 2.N 

Bergmann's Laundry 2 l < 

Bon Ton Food Products 29 

Brass Copper & Supply Co u 

Brentwood Inn 22 

Briggs Construction Co., Inc 27 

D. Harry Chambers, Opticians 29 

Colony Press, Inc 12 

Cooperative Dental Laboratories 29 

Del Haven White House Motel 2.i 

Drummond & Co., Inc 2S 

Duke Ze.bert's Restaurant 1 1 

Eutaw Savings Bank " 

Farmers Cooperative Assn ]] 

First Federal Savings & Loan Assn 24 

Fuller & d'Albert, Inc 11 

Hotel Harrington 3] 

George Hyman Construction Co 27 

E. A. Kaestner Co 28 

Kidwell & Kidwell, Inc 28 

E. H. Koester Bakery Co 2? 

Lustine Chevrolet 10 

Dennis W. Madden 12 

Maryland Hotel Supply Co 24 

McLeod & Romborg Stone Co., Inc 27 

North Washington Press, Inc 11 

Norman Motor Company, Inc 27 

Oles Envelope Corp 31 

Park Transfer Co 28 

Katherine Robb Nursing Home 25 

Rigby's Lot Farm 11 

Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 29 

Schluderberg-Kurdle Co., Inc 10 

Sears Roebuck and Co 25 

Seidenspinner Realtor 23 

Shoreham Hotel 31 

Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co 23 

Mrs. Smith's Colonial Baking Co 25 

Student's Supply Store 24 

Suburban Trust Co 28 

Sweetheart Bread 29 

Thomsson Steel Co., Inc 10 

John M. Walton 12 

Wallop & Son. Insurance 10 

Washington Wholesale Drug Exchange Inc. 11 

Westinghouse Electric Corp 29 

Perry O. Wilkinson 23 

York Wholesalers, Inc 23 



Monty H. Kemp, bpa '63, of East 
Riverdale, Maryland, has been com- 
missioned a second lieutenant in the 
United States Air Force upon gradua- 
tion from Officer Training School at 
Lackland AFB, Texas. He is being re- 
assigned to Laredo AFB, Texas, for 
pilot training. 

Geraldine Marie Case, h.ec. '64, 
was married to John Fowler Schaefer. 
Ensign, United States Navy, June 13. 
1964, in Long Beach, California. 

Henry E. Carmine, Jr., Educ. '64, 
of Baltimore, has been selected for 
duty as an education and training of- 
ficer following his recent commission- 
ing as an Air Force second lieutenant. 

John R. McDonough, engr. '64. 
Silver Spring, Maryland, has arrived at 
Norton AFB, California, for duty as an 
aeronautical engineer following his re- 
cent commissioning as an Air Force 
second lieutenant. 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 






OPERATION 
& SERVICE 

Local Operating Companies 



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American Telephone 
& Telegraph Company 







RESEARCH 
& DEVELOPMENT 

Bell Telephone Laboratories 



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BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 

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Maryland R OOJW 
Uairersity oi Maryland Life 



Miv 



jmni 



College Park. Mj. 

Publication of the University 



of Maryland 



NOV 



41?M 




nna^cizine 



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HOMECOMING SCHEDULE 

November 14 

10:00 ALUMNI REGISTRATION— Student Union (Information on all activities and 
events) 

• Both the new dormitories and the Center for Adult Education will be 
open for inspection. 

• Homecoming house decorations will be on display at the dorms and 
sororities. 

• Continuous showing of filmed football highlights in Student Union 
Auditorium. 

• Golf Driving and Putting Contest for alumni at Golf Driving Range . . . 
(All equipment provided) 

• Bowling contest at Student Union — Prizes will be offered for the golf and 
bowling events. 

11:00-12:30 BUFFET LUNCHEON SERVED AT STUDENT UNION BALLROOM 

At Noon a brief welcome to alumni will be extended by President Wilson H. 
Elkins, and Mrs. Erna Chapman, President of the Alumni Association. An 
added feature of the brief program will be choral selections by the University 
Combined Men's and Women's Chorus under the direction of Prof. Paul 
Traver. 

1:30 FOOTBALL GAME— MARYLAND VS. CLEMSON at Byrd Stadium preceded 
by the float parade. . . . Another special attraction at Byrd Stadium will be 
the crowning of the Homecoming Queen. 

4:30 COMPLIMENTARY REFRESHMENTS immediately following game in new 
Center for Adult Education. Tropics will be awarded to the winners of the 
morning golf and bowling competition. 

5:30 DINNER will be available in the Center for Adult Education Restaurant. Why not 
get a group together for dinner and indicate your plans by filling in the 
coupon below and returning to the Alumni Office as soon as possible, so that 
adequate plans may be made to accommodate you. The cuisine is excellent. 

8:00 to Midnight HOMECOMING DANCE at the Armory. Music for dancing will be furnished 
by the Glenn Miller Orchestra, Ray McKinley conducting. Dress for the occa- 
sion is semiformal. Tickets will be available at the door at $3.00 per couple. 



Please return this form to Office of Alumni Affairs, 
University of Maryland at College Park. 

I plan to attend the Homecoming Luncheon 

Guests will accompany me. 



I need _ tickets for the Maryland-Clemson Foothall Game 

($4.00 reserved— $2.00 end zone) 
(Make checks payable to University of Maryland) 

There will be persons in my party for dinner at the Center for Adult 

Education in the evening. 



MUMS WILL BE ON SALE AT THE STUDENT UNION REGISTRATION 
DESK AND AT THE LUNCHEON AT THE CENTER FOR ADULT EDUCA- 
TION. SALESGIRLS WILL BE MEMBERS OF THE MORTAR BOARD. 



the 




magazine 




Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXVI July-October Number 4 



THE COVER: This is a view of the campus which is available onlj to 
those who are strong and persistent. It was taken from the cupola ol \nne 
Arundel Hall. In the railed circle is the Journalism Building; the chapel 
spire rises above the horizon; McKeldin Librarj is on the lower left. Phol 
grapher Doran Levy overcame obstacles presented bj a suspicious house 
mother, and a difficult climb by steel ladder to the final trap door. 01 
unusual interest in this issue are articles listing the considerable numbei 
of our alumni who have become clergymen; a report on what has happened 
to women students who majored in engineering; and the gratifying news 
that the United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa have authorized formation ol a 
chapter at the University. 



The Pre- Voters 



2 

O An $8 Million Dollar Commitment 

Q Phi Beta Kappa Authorizes a Chapter 

1 \J Reconstructing a Covered Timbered Bridge 
J^ J^ Inside Maryland Sports 

± T" Our Alumni Clergy 

X O Women Engineering Graduates 

X O Alumni and Campus Notes 

2 1 Through the Years 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 
EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 
B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 
HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 
LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 
RICHARD W. CASE, Assistant Treasurer 
DR. WILLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 
THOMAS W. PANGBORN 
THOMAS B. SYMONS 
WILLIAM C. WALSH 
MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
J. B. ZATMAN, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

MRS. ERNA R. CHAPMAN, '34, President 

THE HONORABLE JOSEPH L. CARTER, '25, Vice-President 

MYLO S. DOWNEY, '27, Vice-President 

COL. J. LOGAN SCHUTZ, '38, '40, Secretary Treasurer 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 



OF FICE O F ALUMNI AFFAIRS 
COL. J. LOGAN SCHUTZ, Director 



MARYLAND MAGAZINE STAFF 

ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 

MRS. BARBARA HARRIGAN, Assistant Editor 

AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 



ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

ROBERTSON LEACH 
826 W. 40th Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21211 
Telephone: Belmont 5-8302 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park, Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879.-$3.00 per year-Fifty cents the copy-Member of American Alumni Council. 



.** 



* 



2?4P* 




THE PRE-VOTERS 

A Study of the Political Attitudes and Motivations 
of Pre-voting Age College Students 



POPULAR PERIODICALS OF RECENT VINTAGE HAVE BE- 
come engaged in a controversy concerning the political 
image of college students: Do today's college students 
have a more "conservative" than "liberal" orientation? 
Moreover, if they do, may this be accounted for as a re- 
action against the "liberal" orientation of the last gen- 
eration who grew up under the influence of the depression 
of 1929, and of the social welfare legislation enacted dur- 
ing and since that period? 

We intend to abstain from this popular speculative 
controversy, and endeavor to attack the problem using a 
modern method — collecting data from a behavioral type 
survey. 

The current literature on voting behavior offers several 
methods for studying the political orientations and moti- 
vations of members of the electorate. Almost all of these 
studies, however, cover only those persons who, having 
attained the statutory legal age for voting, actually par- 
ticipate in the political arena. There is a lack of mate- 
rial, unfortunately, about the pre-voting age person, who 
— it is recognized — has some political orientation, but who 
is too young to vote. We have limited our survey, thus, 
to pre-voting age college students. Focusing attention on 
the political behavior of these young persons, moreover, 
is important not only because the number of young per- 
sons attending college is rapidly increasing, but also 
because as graduates they will play an increasingly im- 
portant role as opinion leaders and political decision 
makers in the community. 

A questionnaire was drafted and distributed to 325 
students taking "American Government (G. & P. 1)" 
which is a required course for all students at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. The questionnaires were adminis- 
tered in class during the fall semester, 1963, with the re- 
sponses written. The students remained anonymous. 
Of these responses, 76 were eliminated because of in- 
complete answers or because the respondents were over 
the 21 age limitation we had imposed. The usable re- 
sponses were then codified, punched onto IBM cards, and 
processed through IBM counter-sorter machines at the 
University. 

Since the political orientation of males and females 
are somewhat different, not only in psychoanalytic theory, 
but also in terms of culturally related roles of each in a 
political society; and since the relations of males and fe- 
males to their mothers and fathers are somewhat dif- 
ferent, for similar reasons, we have considered the sexes 
separately throughout the analysis. The sample popu- 
lation thus broken down, amounted to 135 male students 
and 114 female students. 



I. Political Attitudes 

A major problem in any study of political attitudes is 
the definition of political positions. Americans who 
it is generally agreed — are by no means ideologues, 
appear to have less difficulty in categorizing their nun 
position than in spelling out their substantive views. 
Consequently, a set of familiar political labels used as 
categories placed on a simple left-to-right continuum may 
be utilized. This set has been found to be most meaning- 
ful to American college students. 1 The students are pre- 
sented with socialist, liberal, and conservative cate- 
gories; the latter two being further subdivided by a 
qualifying adverb. The responses to this inquixj arc found 
in Table 1 . 

The results demonstrate the predisposition of the stu- 
dents toward liberalism. The ideological predisposition 
of fully two-thirds of the total students fall within the 
liberal views categories. The female students, we note, 
are more liberal than the male students (73.79? to 
70.9%), though none appear to be extremely liberal 
(i. e., socialist). It is interesting to note, further, that rela- 
tively few cases are to be found in the extreme categories. 
It appears, also, that males were more likely than females 
to have no crystallized political views. 



II. Student Rebellion 

The current controversy that we noted in the outset of 
this paper is two fold. Having investigated the first as- 
pect, i.e., the direction of today's college students' polit- 
ical orientation — and finding it to be liberal — we turn now 
to see whether this is a manifestation of conformity with 
the last generation, or whether there is some rebellion 
against parental political beliefs. 



Moms Levitt /. v ( ; graduate assistant ami summer lecturer 
in the Department of Government and Politics in the Collegt 
of Business and Public Administration, and an Instructor in 
University College. He received his B.A. degree from Pace College 
in New York City in I960 and his MA. degree from the Univer- 
sity of North Carolina in 1962. His interest in voting behavior 
began at North Carolina with the writing of his master's thesis, 
•The Female Voter — A Study of the Effect of work and Marriage 
on the Political Behavior and Attitude', of the American Woman," 
which was basal on results of a nationwide survey conducted b) 
the Survey Research Center in Michigan. His dissertation for his 
doctorate, which he hopes to receive in 1965, will be a stud) 
apathy — the factors of non-VOting in the American electorate. 



July-October, 1964 



The respondents at the University of Maryland were 
asked to place their parents on the same political ideology 
spectrum that they considered for themselves. It is not 
essential that the position attributed to the parents by 
the respondent be accurate; for the purposes of this 
study what the parents actually believe is far less im- 
portant than what the student thinks they believe. This 
is presented in Table 1, also. 

As noted above, the modal category for the students 
was moderately liberal. The same results are found for 



TABLE 2 

Political Views oj Students in Relation to 

Perceived Parental Views 





TABLE 


I 




Political Views 


oj Students and Perceptions oj 


Parental Views, 


by Sex 








Percent 


PERCEIVED 


Political views 


Percent 
holding 

VIEWS 


TO HOLD VIEWS 




Fathers 


Mothers 


Male students: 








Socialist 


1.4% 


0.7% 


0.7% 


Highly liberal 


8.8 


8.1 


8.1 


Moderately liberal 


50.7 


38.6 


33.3 


Moderately conservative 26.6 


34.8 


34.8 


Highly conservative 


3.7 


8.1 


10.3 


No political views 


8.8 


9.7 


12.6 


Total 


100 % 


100 % 


100 % 


Number of cases 


135 


135 


135 


Female students: 








Socialist 


0.0% 


0.9% 


0.9% 


Highly liberal 


14.0 


7.0 


8.7 


Moderately liberal 


59.7 


50.8 


46.5 


Moderately conservative 21.0 


29.8 


28.0 


Highly conservative 


1.8 


3.5 


5.4 


No political views 


3.5 


7.9 


10.5 


Total 


100 % 


100 % 


100 % 


Number of cases 


114 


114 


114 



the perceived positions of the parents (mothers of the 
male students digressing slightly). 2 

The views of the students as compared to the views 
they attribute to their parents may become clearer if re- 
arranged into classifications of rebellion: 3 

1. Rebels to the left of parents: The student places 
himself to the left of both parents or to the left of one 
parent when the other parent has no political views 
or when his views are unknown to the student. 

2. Rebels to the right of parents: The student 
places himself to the right of both parents, or to the 
right of one parent when the other parents has no 
political views or when his views are unknown to the 
student. 

3. Conformists: The student shares the beliefs of 
one or both of his parents. 

4. Independent crystallizers: The student has ar- 
rived at the political position although both his parents 
either have no political views or have views of which 
he is unaware. 

5. Uncrystallized: The student has no explicit 
political views. 

The degree of rebellion is less than that of conformity; 
see Table 2. Over half the students (53 percent) are 
found to be conforming to the shared beliefs of one or 
both of their parents; while just over a third of the stu- 
dents (38.2 percent) were rebels. The patterns of the 
male and female respondents are consistent, though the 
degree of similarity alters in every category. Females 
conform to their parents' beliefs more than males (a dif- 
ference of nearly 10 percentage points.) 

Among those who rebel, there is a slightly greater 
tendency to move to the left of their parents than to the 
right. It appears, then, that those students who deviated 
from the political preference of their parents are as likely 
to do so in a conservative direction as in a liberal direction. 



Relation of student 


Percent of students 










PARENTAL VIEWS 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Rebels to left of parents 


20.9% 


21.9% 


21.3% 


Rebels to right of parents 


18.3 


14.9 


16.9 


Conformists 


48.2 


58.8 


53.0 


Independent crystallizers 


3.7 


0.9 


2.4 


Uncrystallized 


8.9 


3.5 


6.4 


Total 


100 % 


100 % 


100 % 


Number of cases 


135 


114 


249 



III. Personality Factors 

The part that personality factors play in the mass 
political process has been the subject of much contro- 
versy. Harold Lasswell, who fostered an interest in psy- 
chology as a tool in political analysis, once wrote: "The 
significance of political opinions is not to be grasped 
apart from the private motives which they symbolize." 4 
From this viewpoint personality differences so color the 
processes of perception and the development of attitudes 
that any account of behavior — political as well as social 
or economic — must lean to some degree on personality 
theory. We recognize that personality factors do not 
totally shape response dispositions; they only contribute 
to those dispositions under certain circumstances. We 
do feel, however, that in trying to analyze potential vot- 
ers, we should pay some attention to the aspects involved 
with personality. 



A. Authoritarian Personality. 

Perhaps a key to political participation can be found in 
a study of the authoritarian personality. Authoritarian- 
ism is a syndrome rather than a single psychological 
trait. It is a pattern of interrelated predispositions: con- 
formity, rigidity, conventionality, submissiveness, power 
and toughness, strong leadership worship, etc. 

The predisposition to conform to authority is directly 
relevant to the study of political behavior in a democratic 
society. It is significantly and directly related to such 
feelings as political ineffectiveness and to apathy, which 
we shall discuss below. 

Authoritarianism is relevant in explaining political 
orientation and feelings of self-confidence about politics. 
Authoritarian attitudes imply personal frustration and 
resulting hostility and impatience with democratic ef- 
forts. Highly authoritarian persons tend to express feel- 
ings of political futility while others feel more politically 
effective. Furthermore, authoritarian environs operate 
to limit the information one receives, to retard the devel- 
opment of efficiency in judgement and reasoning abili- 
ties, and to confine the attention to the more trivial inter- 
ests in life. 

Authoritarians tend to view politics in black and white 
terms; have a desire for immediate action, an impa- 
tience with talk and discussion, a lack of interest in or- 
ganizations which have a long-range perspective, and a 
readiness to follow leaders who offer a demonological 
interpretation of the evil forces which are conspiring 
against them. 

In response to questions designed to test for the author- 
itarian syndrome, the students were to agree a lot, agree 
a little, disagree a lot, or disagree a little. Their answers 
were weighted for scoring purposes. A value of 4 was 



4 



the Maryland Magazine 



given for those responses agreeing a lot, 3 for those 
agreeing a little, 2 for those disagreeing a little, and I for 
those disagreeing a lot. A perfect score of 1 would be 
given to those who showed no signs of authoritarianism 
by disagreeing to every statement. A high score shows a 
high inclination to the authoritarian syndrome. 

Generally the students display a low score. The male 
score was computed to be 2.30, the female 2.19. and the 
score for the general body of respondents 2.25. Female 
students thus display the patterns of the authoritarian 
syndrome less than the males; and as a subgroup rank 
below the total score of the group. These scores demon- 
strate a tendency of political attitudes that continue in 
other political attitudes discussed below. 

B. Political Efficacy. 

Other aspects of political behavior may also reflect 
personality dynamics. It is reasonable to look for some 
influence of personality organization on the inclination to 
participate politically. While we have chosen a pre- 
voting age sample, it is worthwhile to look at this vari- 
able which may be conceived as lying at a relatively 
"deep" level in any hierarchy of dispositions. It is be- 
lieved that this factor represents highly generalized ori- 
entations toward the world of politics and could be ex- 
pected to remain rather stable over a period of time. 

The measure of political efficacy is designed to cap- 
ture differences between individuals in a basic sense of 
control over the workings of the political system. Effi- 
cacy is the feeling that political activity is worthwhile; 
"that individual political action does have, or can have, 
an impact upon the political process, i.e., that it is worth- 
while to perform one's civic duties." ' Furthermore, it is 
the feeling that political as well as social change can oc- 
cur, and that the individual citizen can play a part in 
bringing about this change. 

In response to questions designed to test for political 
efficacy, the students were to agree a lot, agree a little, 
disagree a lot, or disagree a little. Their answers were 
weighted for scoring purpose as explained above in the 
discussion on authoritarianism. 

Generally the students display a high score. Remem- 
bering the perfect score to be 4, the results showed that 
the males ranked with a score of 3.09, the females 3.12, 
and the total score for the group was 3.11. The females 
who scored as a group lower on the above scale, con- 
tinue the pattern by scoring higher than the males on 
this scale. 

C. Citizen Duty. 

Similar to, but not the same as efficacy, is another 
factor in political behavior, a sense of citizen duty. This 
is the feeling of participation in political processes re- 
gardless of efficacy; "it is the feeling that oneself and 
others ought to participate in the political process, re- 
gardless of whether such political activity is seen as 
worthwhile." G 

The sense of citizen duty differs from political efficacy 
in one further way. Political efficacy may be determined 
in part by broader personality trends than those which 
reflect immediate political experience. The sense of con- 
trol or mastery over the environment is an important 
component of modern personality theory, i.e., that one 
is aware in a general way as to how successful he is in 
transactions with his environment. Citizen duty is also 



a response to moralistic values about citizen partit 
tion. i. e., how one is apt in endorse the common "oughts" 
i>i good citizenship. 

If the reader will bring t<> mind once again th< scoring 
process described above, and remembei that a 
4 would show a perfect sense ol em/en duty, he will note 
thai with the males scoring 5 10, the females 1.45, and 
the entire group average at 3.37, the females on< 
score highei than the males in tins political variable 



IV. Conclusion 

I he survej oi political views of selected students at the 
University oi Maryland showed several interesting facets 

of political attitudes and motivations ol pre-voting 

college students. 

The students generally had a political predisposition 
toward the more liberal end of a political ideolog} COn- 

tinuum. Female students appeared more liberal than 
male students on the measurement scale. Few students. 
however, of either sex identified themselves with extreme 
ideological positions. It appears, from the analysis under- 
taken in part one. that the popular conception ol over- 
whelming conservatism among college students, is nut 
a completely correct one. While it is difficult to general- 
ize from our study alone, we note that the same held true 
in one other survey which had selected a larger sample- 
in a wider spread of colleges. 

The last generation appears to have an important in- 
fluence upon the current generation of students inter- 
viewed. Rather than rebelling against their parents' 
political views, over 50 percent of the students conformed 
to them. Moreover, over one-fifth of the sample (or over 
half of those who did rebel from parental views I appear to 
take an ideological position to the political left of their 
parents. 

Investigating selected personality factors, that have 
been deemed to have influence on political attitudes and 
motivations, we found what may be considered a con- 
sistency with the apparent political views of the students. 
The student respondents displayed a very optimistic 
and strong orientation to the political world and to their 
participation in that world. They felt that participation 
in the political process is worthwhile, and that they have 
some control over affecting governmental policy deci- 
sions in various ways, as well as through the ballot which 
they soon will be legally able to cast. Moreover, thej 
agreed to the common "oughts" of good citizenship and 
felt that one should participate in the political process 
as a civic duty. While student responses were generally 
high, the female respondents appeared to have a more 
optimistic and strong orientation than the males: which 
is in agreement with their predisposition toward liberal- 
ism moreso than their male colleagues. 



Note--: 

1. See especially: Russell Middleton and Snell Putney, "Student Rebellion 
Against Parental Political Beliefs," Social Forces, 41 (May, 1963), pp. 
377-383, 

2. It is ol personal interest to note the remarkably -.miliar political view- 
points of the parents as perceived bj the students. Tested data gathered 
in a nation wide survej showed that the percentage ol similar views ol 

husbands anil wives are 86 percent. This appears in our "The Female 
Voter: A Study of the Effect of Work and Marriage on the Political 
Behavior and Attitudes of the American Woman.'' 
X See Middleton and Putney, ('/•■ Clt., p. 380. 

4. Psychopathology and Politics, (Chicago: Universlt) of Chicago Press, 
1930). p. 172. 

5. Anvils Campbell, et. al.. The Voter Decides. (Ivanston. 111.: Row Peter- 
son and Company, 1954), pp. 187-194. 

6. ibid., pp. 194-199. 

7. Middleton and Putney, "/'. Cit. 



Juh-October, J 964 



AN $8 MILLION 
TO HIGHER EDU(] 

Four New Buildings 




FINE ARTS BUILDING 

Architect hopkins and pfeiffer 
Structural engineer van rensselaer p. saxe 
Mechanical and electrical james posey associates 
General contractor george hyman construc- 
tion CO. 
Total cost $2,505,000 
Total gross floor area 136,916 square feet 

This building is to house the Departments of Speech, 
Music, and Art and the University Theatre. An audi- 
torium-theatre will seat 1 ,500 persons. 

Estimated completion date: February, 1965 



ELKTON HALL 
(WOMEN'S DORMITORY) 

Architect ted englehardt 
Structural engineer scullen and marchigiant 
Mechanical engineer h. walton redmile 
associates 
Electrical engineer kenneth w. cobb 
General contractor george hyman 

construction CO. 
Total Cost $1,875,000 
Total gross floor area 1 15,203 square feet 
Student capacity 508 
Resident assistant capacity six 

Estimated completion date: 1 965 



the Maryland Magazine 



I COMMITMENT 
4 IN MARYLAND 

htion At College Park 







*,>MW"Wnf! 



H 



JJT 1 







•> .- 



# 



I 






CENTER FOR ADULT EDUCATION 

Architect aubinoe and berry and 

RIO 

Structural engineer beall and lemay 
Mechanical and electrical J. b. wylie and associates 
General contractor james l. partello, inc. 
Total cost $2,000,000 
Total gross floor area 109,943 square feet 

The Center's facilities are located in five stories and a 
basement. They include kitchen and dining facilities for 
450-500 persons, an exhibit area of approximately 4,300 
square feet, a coffee shop seating 92 persons, administra- 
tive offices for University College, seven conference rooms 
with a capacity of 555, 116 bedrooms, and parking facili- 
ties for 400 automobiles. 

Completion date: October 1 , 1964 




yfs*iy£& 



^ 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION & 
GENERAL CLASSROOM BUILDING 

Architect BOOTH VND SOMERS 

Structural engineer STEV1 NSON wn KELIA 

Mechanical & electrical HICKS-TAT1 [NC 

General contractor JAMES POSE"V ASSOCIATES 

Total cost $1,610,000 

Total gross floor area 1 12.505 SQl \ki mm 

Estimated completion date: 1965 
This building is to house all departments o] the College 
of Education, except Industrial Education. 



July-October, 1964 



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WESTERN UNION 



TELEGRAM „ 






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SIB026 {P BIA168) NL PD=BUR L I NGTON VT SEPT 1*7~ 
:NEWS BUREAU, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND, DLR = 
COLLEGE PARK MD = 

TWENTY-SEVENTH TRIENNIAL COUNCIL OF PHI BETA KAPPA 
TONIGHT APPROVED THE ESTABLISHMENT OF A PHI BETA 
KAPPA CHAPTER AT UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND. LETTER WILL 
F0LL0W= 

BETTY KUGLER FOR THE UNITED CHAPTERs= 



11 APPRECIATE SUGGESTIONS FROM ITS PATRONS CON 



Phi Beta Kappa Authorizes 
Establishment of a Chapter at the University 



The United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa, the National 
Honor Society of the liberal arts and sciences, has noti- 
fied the Phi Beta Kappa members of the faculty of the 
University of Maryland that they will be authorized to organ- 
ize a chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa on the College Park 
campus. The Phi Beta Kappa Society was originally founded 
in 1776 and now includes over 160 colleges and universities 
with active chapters. The purpose of the society is to rec- 
ognize outstanding achievement and to promote high stand- 
ards of scholarship in the liberal arts and sciences. Noti- 
fication came September 2. 

President Elkins, himself a member of the Phi Beta Kappa 
Chapter at the University of Texas, was pleased by the 
University's election. Dr. Elkins assumed the presidency of 
the University in 1954. In his report this year to the Univer- 
sity's Board of Regents, he said, ". . . this has been a decade 
of progress and promise. For this we owe a debt of grati- 
tude to all of the past, and a note of appreciation to all those 
in the present whose contributions give promise for greater 
educational achievement in the future." The President has 
received wide recognition for his establishment at the Uni- 
versity of high academic standards and scholarly achieve- 
ment. 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, President of the University's 
Alumni Association, telegraphed this message to President 
Elkins: "On behalf of 50,000 alumni of the University, con- 
gratulations on the establishment of a Phi Beta Kappa Chap- 
ter at the University of Maryland. This is indeed a shining 
hour for our great University." 

Dr. John S. Toll, Chairman of the Department of Physics 
and Astronomy, is President of the University's Phi Beta 
Kappa Association. In his statement describing the Univer- 
sity's efforts to locate a chapter here, Dr. Toll said, 



"The University of Maryland has an unusually large group 
of over 140 faculty members who were elected as members 
of the Phi Beta Kappa at other institutions. It is this group 
which will form the nucleus of the Phi Beta Kappa Chap- 
ter at the University of Maryland, and in future years, out- 
standing undergraduate students in the Arts and Sciences at 
the University of Maryland will then be elected to the soci- 
ety on the basis of their academic achievements. 

"The selection of the University of Maryland as the site of 
a new chapter of Phi Beta Kappa is in recognition of the 
high standards of scholarship at the University. The empha- 
sis on quality in all aspects of the University's program has 
been supported by President Elkins and the Board of Regents. 
The establishment of the Phi Beta Kappa Chapter is but 
one of the ways in which students of high scholarship can 
achieve recognition. Recently, the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences has introduced an Honors Program in most of its 
departments which permits the exceptional students to under- 
take more independent studies and advanced work than is 
included in the normal academic program. The University 
Library has been greatly increased and is now one of the 
best university research libraries in the region. Modern 
classrooms and laboratories also have been constructed. 
Nearly all of the departments of the College of Arts and 
Sciences have been provided with new and renovated class- 
rooms and many special research facilities have been con- 
structed as needed in the sciences. 

"The University has also emphasized quality in the 
expansion of the faculty and the resulting teaching staff is 
outstanding in many areas. Several faculty members have 
received Fulbright scholarships, Marshall scholarships. So- 
cial Science Research Council Grants, as well as fellow- 
ships from the Guggenheim Foundation, National Science 



8 



the Maryland Magazine 



Foundation (junior and senior awards). NATO, the Slum 
Foundation, and the Ford Foundation. One faculty member 
won the J. Lawrence Smith Medal of the National Academy 
of Sciences, one was named to the list of the '10 Outstanding 
Men of 1959* in a national selection by the United States 
Junior Chamber of Commerce, two have won (in different 
years) the $1,000 top prize in the annual Babson Awards in 
Gravitation, and one won the Arthur A. Fleming Research 
Award, and one won the Maryland Academy of Sciences 
Award for the Outstanding Young Scientist of 1963. The 
Washington Academy of Sciences gives one award each year 
to one outstanding scientist in each of several fields; during 
the past four years, nine of these prizes have been won by 
University of Maryland scientists, the largest number award- 
ed to any one university or laboratory. 

"The standards of undergraduate students also have been 
improving, as demonstrated by scores on national exami- 
nations. The graduates of the University have achieved wide 
recognition in many fields of scholarship and public service. 
A survey of graduates from 1957 to 1961 showed that approx- 
imately 60% completed at least one year of graduate study. 
Graduates from this same period had been awarded a vari- 
ety of fellowships, including Woodrow Wilson Foundation (in 
1964 seven undergraduates were named winners), Ful- 
bright, Randolph Hearst, Ford Foundation, U. S. Public 
Health Service, Union Carbide, National Science Foundation. 
Du Pont, and National Institutes of Health. Graduates also 



hold professorships at leading uni 

MM t niversit) ol < alifornia, etc i and important j 

at other centers ol scholarship, 

"The msiiiution.il goal i>i the I nh '•' id is 

excellence m all oi us endeavoi rhe i tablishmenl ol the 
Phi Beta Kappa ( haptei on the < oll< campus will 

be ol greaf importance in maintaining these stand 
excellence. In addition to recognizing outstandii 
nates in election to the chapter, the Phi Beta k.ip; 
will also continue to grant scholarship: and ; 
standing students and to sponsoi lecture on the - imp 

visiting scholars. 

"One important feature ol .i group such .is Phi Beta Kappa 
is to stress the unit) oi the studj ol the aris and 
In this age of specialization, il is important to have •■ in 
ing group such as Phi Beta Kappa, which stresses the com- 
mon spirit of all the arts and sciences and the functioi 
the university as a 'community ol scholars.' I in 
adoption of a new program oi General 1 diK.iiion.il Require- 
ments of the Universitj and the new General Horn 
gram in the Arts and Sciences are moves to encourage pro- 
grams that link good students m all departments ol the ( ol- 

lege. I he establishment ol the new chapter ol Phi Beta 

Kappa will be a major step in the maintenance al the I ni- 
versity of a program of undergraduate education ol high 
academic standards and a broad liberal viewpoint in schol- 
arship." 




President Wilson H. Elkins holds a formal petition from 
members of the University of Maryland Phi Beta Kappa 
Association which was presented along with their application 
for the establishment of a local chapter at the University. The 
petition and application were made to the United Chapters 
of Phi Beta Kappa. The Association was notified September 2 



of the United Chapters' affirmative decision. From left to 
right: Dr. John S. Toll. Professor and Chairman, Department 

of Physics and Astronomy: Dr. H<>m,i It Schamp, Jr.. Pro- 
fessor, Molecular Physics: President Elkins; Dl R I < v Horn- 
bake. Vice President for Academic Affairs; Dr. ( hailes 

Manning. Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. 



July-October, 1964 





Reconstructing a 

COVERED TIMBER BRIDGE 

by ALBERT S. SALKOWSKI, Class of 1950, School of Engineering 



U 



NLIKE THEIR MODERN COUNTER- 

parts, the men who made yesterday's 
bridges could not move mountains or 
streams to accommodate their needs 
and therefore they had to put a great 
deal of ingenuity and sweat into the 
building of a covered bridge. Our 
grandfathers had no such things as 
diesel shovels, bulldozers or dynamite, 
and the terrain — not men — dictated 
where the big spans should be. And 
when it came to actual construction, 
their equipment consisted of a few 
crude tools, native skill and the pi- 
oneer virtues of perseverance and 
hard work. And the usual material 
of construction for bridges was wood. 
But why were bridges covered? 
This question is as old as the bridges 
themselves. Well, they were not cov- 
ered to protect the user, his horse 
or his load of hay. They were not 
covered so that horses would think 
they were barns, or prevent old Dob- 
bin from shying at the glint of water. 
Nor were they covered to keep snow 
off the floor. And certainly they were 
not covered, as one tongue-in-check 
theory has it, to prevent a traveler's 
knowing what kind of town he was 



approaching until it was too late to 
turn back. 

The real and only reason for cov- 
ering bridges, discounting all tales, 
theories, and legends, was to pro- 
tect the wooden skeleton and thus 
preserve the bridge itself. 

Maryland was in the forefront in 
the development of wooden bridges. 
In addition to having the first covered 
wooden overpass and the first wooden 
truss railroad span, the Old Line 
State had its share of wooden high- 
way bridges — big and little. 

The stream called Gunpowder 
Falls in Baltimore County once was 
spanned by covered bridges at Monk- 
ton and Loch Raven. By 1961, only 
one spanned this stream, called the 
Bunker Hill Road Bridge. Built in 
1880 and restored in 1947, it stood 
on a side road northwest of Hereford. 
It had an arch truss based on Theo- 
dore Burr's design with overhanging 
portals that sported a neat board- 
and-batten finish. On Saturday, No- 
vember 18, 1961, the Bunker Hill 
Road covered timber bridge was de- 
stroyed by fire and the ashes were 
not discovered until morning. 

Immediately thereafter a hue and 
cry was heard from those who felt 



that the artistry of our forefathers 
should be preserved at all costs and 
that a replica of the original timber 
bridge should be constructed. On the 
other hand, there were those who 
thought a new, modern bridge of 
structural steel and reinforced con- 
crete should replace the last reminder 
of the old-type covered timber bridge 
in Baltimore County. 

A timber covered bridge was fa- 
vored not only because of the interest 
in covered bridges and the fact that 
this would be the only such bridge 
owned by Baltimore County, but also 
because of the remoteness of the lo- 
cation, the minimal traffic, lack of 
plans for future development in the 
area, and economy. 

It was decided to construct a rep- 
lica of the destroyed bridge. 

How is an engineer to construct a 
replica of a bridge destroyed by fire 
when no construction drawings are 
available? A study of the main struc- 
tural members, which had not been 
completely destroyed, revealed that 
the bolted connections were structur- 
ally insufficient although the timber 
sizes indicated more than adequate 
load-bearing capacity. Some research 
was a necessity. The remaining tim- 



10 



the Maryland Magazine 



vm 




\ 



m 




ber bridges in nearby counties were 
inspected. Newspapers and reference 
books on timber bridges were one 
source of information, and photo- 
graphs taken of the bridge in question 
by a covered bridge enthusiast, be- 
fore its destruction, were an invalu- 
able aid. 

A study of the photographs re- 
vealed that the main structural mem- 
ber was an auxiliary truss. 

Except for minor alterations, the 
existing stone abutments were util- 
ized. The changes in the abutments 
consisted of pouring a 6-inch rein- 
forced concrete bridge seal and back- 
wall. Also, reinforced concrete pilas- 
ters were poured against the stone 
abutments to resist thrust from the 
arches. 

The new bridge was planned as a 
replica of the old bridge, to be made 
up of timbers of the same size. 

The main structural components 
of the bridge, the two auxiliary 
trusses (truss-arches), carry the load. 
The through-truss span is 107 feet 
long. 

The bridge is constructed for one 
lane of traffic, with a clear horizontal 
distance between timber wheel guards 
of 12 ft. 6 in. The minimum vertical 
clear distance of the wheel guard and 
over the knee-brace is 11 ft. 8 in. 
At the center of the bridge, the ver- 
tical clear distance is 13 ft. 1 in. 
To minimize the possibility of de- 
struction by fire, the stringers, plank 
floor, and wheel guards were pres- 
sure-treated with a fire retardent pre- 
servative. Resurfacing or remilling, 
other than ordinary end-cutting of 



lumber, was prohibited. All lumber 
treated with a fire retardent was kiln 
dried after treatment and had to be 
protected against moisture until 
placed. 

To give the timber an appearance 
of antiquity as well as to protect it 
against the elements, the auxiliary 
truss, the roof and sheating, and the 
floor beams were treated with a solu- 
tion of pentachlorophenal. All cuts 
and abrasions in the treated lumber 
were brush coated with a minimum 
of two applications of the solution. 
Bolt holes bored after treatment were 
treated by means of an approved 
pressure bolt-hole treater. Recesses 
made for countersinking were given 
at least two coats of the pentachloro- 
phenol solution. 

All fabricated members were indi- 
vidually wrapped in a moisture-re- 
sistant paper for protection in transit 
and storage. The timber members 
were protected against precipitation 
during erection by covering them with 
polyethelyne. This protective wrap- 
ping was not removed until the roof 
and siding were in place. 

The siding was made of 1 x 10 
finger-jointed end-glued pieces of 
kiln-dried, vertical-grain redwood 
with 1 x 2 matching batten strips. 
Both sides of the siding were textured 
coarse-sanded for uniformity of ap- 
pearance on both the outside and 
inside of the bridge. 

Two coats of stain were applied to 
the redwood siding. 

Roof shakes were hand-split red 
cedar shingles of random width, 24 
in. long, delivered untreated to the 



site. They were hand dipped in ex- 
terior redwood stain before being 
placed on the root. 

All hardware used was galvanized. 
The contractor used an old barn to 
store the members, and also to fabri- 
cate them whenever possible. For 
instance, for the roof trusses, the en- 
tire A-frame was fabricated on the 
ground and put in place as a unit. 

Individual pieces of the arch were 
fabricated and made to fit in place. 
Because of the complexity of the 
joints, extreme care was required in 
cutting, boring and fitting. 

The supporting falsework was not 
removed until the auxiliary truss, root 
truss, and all horizontal truss bracing 
were in place. Before the falsework 
was removed, all bolted connections 
were tightened and the threads 
burred. 

The preservation o( structures from 
the past, even by substitution, has a 
definite place in the world o\' today. 
Perhaps too much emphasis is placed 
on replacement and obsolescence 
rather than on continuity and good 
maintenance. Reconstruction of the 
Bunker Hill Road Bridge is a salute 
to the ingenuity and resourcefulness 
of the present-day engineer, and to 
his respect for the interesting design 
and good workmanship oi a former 
day. 

The new Bunker Mill Covered 
Bridge will become a part of the 
future Gunpowder State Park. Where 
could there be a more appropriate 
site for it than at this State Park 
development where wild life and for- 
est conditions will be preserved? 



July-October, 1964 




T-'ni 



- 



Fred Joyce, senior guard 



Jerry Fishman. junior fullback 



Dick Absher, sophomore end 



Howard Humphries, junior en 



Inside Maryland Sports 

by Bill Dismer 
Director of Sports Information 

WITH A LITTLE LUCK COACH TOM NUGENT's FOOTBALL 
team could well have won its first three games instead 
of losing two of them, to Oklahoma and North Carolina State. 
An opening day crowd of 36,500 came within four minutes 
of seeing a tremendous upset as Maryland, thanks to its new 
kicking star Bernardo Bramson, led the mighty Sooners, 3-0, 
only to fall victim to a 90-yard touchdown pass which started 
Oklahoma on its way to a 13-3 victory. The following week, 
though, the Terps routed a highly-rated South Carolina team 
which had tied Duke, 24-6, only to fall a one-point victim to 
North Carolina State, 14-13, in their first road game. 

At any rate the sophomore-dominated Terps have given 
evidence of providing many thrills for Maryland supporters 
this season which will be climaxed by the Navy game at Byrd 
Stadium November 7 and the homecoming with Clemson 
November 14. 

Maryland experienced the cruel blow of losing its No. 1 
quarterback, Kenny Ambrusko, in the second quarter of the 
opening game when he received a dislocated left elbow. How- 
ever, a sophomore from Hagerstown, Phil Petry, stepped into 
the breach and did a creditable job without much preparation. 
Two other first-year men also have shown tremendous 
promise: tailback Tom "Bo" Hickey of Stamford, Conn, and 
fullback Walt "Whitey" Marciniak of Old Forge, Pa. Hickey's 
77-yard touchdown run against N.C. State was the highlight 
of the first three games. 

Maryland took the field with 18 lettermen, and Terrapin 
fans saw Coach Tom Nugent revert to his two-team style of 
play, offensive and defensive, which was so successful before 
a rules change several years back. With the recent easing of 
the substitution rule, Nugent again will go with two distinct 
teams — "Go" and "Stop" combinations. 

With one eye on the schedule which shows such ground- 
power teams as Duke, North Carolina, Clemson and Penn 
State as well as Oklahoma and Navy, Nugent has stacked 
his defensive line with lettermen juniors and seniors from 
tackle to tackle. His biggest move was the transfer of Jerry 
Fishman, 220-pound junior who led the backs in ground-gain- 
ing last year, from fullback to guard, or linebacker. But 
Fishman is a rough-and-tumble sort who revels in playing 
defense and is just the type Maryland needed on the line. 



Olaf Drozdov, three-sports star and a senior, will man one 
of the tackle spots with Larry Bagranoff, a junior who let- 
tered as a soph, at the other one. Fred Joyce, one of the 
greatest interior linemen Maryland has had, will be at the 
other guard, and Lou Bury, a senior, at center. Ends on the 
defensive team will be Chip Myrtle, an outstanding 6-2, 200- 
pound soph, and Johny Kenny, a 215-pound junior. 

Following the Oklahoma opener, Maryland was at home 
the following Saturday in its first conference game against 
South Carolina. Then followed three road games in succession 
against N. C. State, Duke and North Carolina, the last-named 
in the Oyster Bowl at Norfolk, Va. Wake Forest will be at 
Byrd Stadium on October 24, the week before the Terps travel 
to Penn State. Games with Navy and Clemson wind up the 
home schedule November 7 and 14 before the Terps end the 
season at Virginia November 21. 



Coach Bud Millikan is looking forward with extreme zest 
to his 1964-'65 basketball schedule which will find his team 
at home for 12 games of the 24-game schedule. Outstanding 
home games are listed with Navy, Penn State, George Wash- 
ington, West Virginia and Kansas in addition to the seven 
ACC foes. Ten lettermen will be returning from last win- 
ter's squad while five sophomores who posted a 15-1 record 
last year, should give Maryland its strongest bench in years. 
A tentative starting five is composed of juniors Gary Ward 
(6-5), Neil Brayton (6-4), Rick Wise (6-8) and Mike De- 
Cosmo (5-10). Gary Williams, 6-0 soph, stands the best 
chance of joining these upperclassmen. 



Coach Doyle Royal's soccer team, among the country's 
highest ranked collegiate outfits in recent years, opens its 
season October 9 at N. C. State. Royal should have some 20 
players back from the squad which had a 10-3 record last 
year and was beaten only in the semifinals of the NCAA 
tournament. Eberhard Klein, a senior, set a game scoring 
record last year with seven goals against Georgetown. Five 
of the hooters' ten games are scheduled for Maryland's soc- 
cer field, adjacent to the football practice field east of Byrd 
Stadium. The home schedule opens with the Penn State game 
October 1 3 and other home games will have Georgetown, 
Navy, North Carolina and Duke as our guests. 



Twenty-three Maryland athletes were among the 166 mak- 
ing the Atlantic Coast Conference's eighth annual Honor Roll 
of Athletes — composed of athletes who averaged grades of B 
or better during a full school year. 



12 



the Maryland Magazine 




Jim Busick, tennis 



Bill Pettit, attack 



They were Nelson Aurand, wrestling; Alfred Caron, track; 
Francis Cecil, track; Jackie Clark, basketball; George Cra- 
mer, track; Donald Dunphy, swimming; Brenden Fisk, la- 
crosse; Mike George, track and cross country; Norman Hat- 
field, football; Eberhard Klein, soccer; Spencer King, lacrosse; 
John Kreissig, baseball; Tom Krueger, track and cross coun- 
try; Tom Manfredi, swimming; Frank Marasco, soccer; 
Dave Nardo, football; Christ Okikiade, soccer; Mike Rota, 
golf; Ramsay Thomas, track and cross country; Kenneth 
Wall, swimming; Larry Walsh, track; Jim Watkins, baseball, 
and Frank Wikander, wrestling. 

Atlantic Coast Conference champions of two spring sports, 
co-champion in another, runnerup in a fourth and a surprise 
third-place finisher in a fifth gave Maryland supporters 
much to cheer about as their second semester teams won 
nearly three-fourths of the contests in which they were en- 
gaged. 



Won Lost Tied 



Tennis 


14 








Track 


3 








Golf 


9 


3 


1 


Lacrosse 


11 


3 





Baseball 


10 


9 





Total . . . 


. 47 


15 


1 



(Won ACC championship) 
(Won ACC championship) 
(Shared ACC championship) 
(Finished 2d in ACC) 
(Finished 3rd in ACC) 



Two of the teams were undefeated: Coach Doyle Royal's 
great tennis squad which ended North Carolina's six-year 
reign as ACC net king, and Coach Jim Kehoe's track stars 
who won three dual meets before successfully defending 
their conference title in a meet here in Byrd Stadium. 

Probably the most spectacular records were set by the 
scores and which dropped only 20 of 124 singles and doubles 
tennis team which won six of its 14 matches by shutout 
matches played. Clemson, North Carolina and George Wash- 
ington extended the Terps to 5-4 decisions and Navy bowed 
by a 6-3 score. All other matches were by margins of 7-2, 
8-1 and 9-0. 

Barry Cleveland, senior from Coatesville, Pa., was the only 
Marylander to go undefeated in singles although Len Mod- 
zelewski, a soph from Pittsburgh and Gene Gerber, the 
number two player from Baltimore, lost only once. Jim Bu- 
sick, Maryland's top netman, won eight straight before being 
stopped by GW's Buddy Goeltz and then won two more be- 
fore dropping a tough three-setter to Clemson's Doug Stew- 
art. Tom Marcellino and Lou Dobies, the Terps' fifth and 
sixth players, lost only twice. 



h was onlj the second tune in - nee histor) thai 

North ( arolina had failed w win the tennis title and 
priatel onl) othei team to have won was the Maryland 

team ol 195 Maryland will have tbn 
ers back nexl yeai losing onlj < levelai 
cellino bj graduation 

Ma) 2 was the big da) for the track U 
shadowing the \< < trad meel itu- followii Bui «>n 

the lirst Saturda) in Ma) an underdog Maryland team 
formed al its absolute besl to whip Navy, 76 64 before hun- 
dreds ol happy, screaming fans who picked up ' 
alter the last event and rode him oil the Held on theii houl 
ders. Not man) had given Maryland .i chan 
thinclads, but the lerps ran up a s '> -21 edg< 
which was more than enough to overcome Navj 
premacy in the field, ["wo juniors, Steve Lamb .m>i M 
Cole, were double winners foi Maryland, the former tal 
the 440 and 220 while ( ole won the broad jump and the I 
dred. 

One week later Maryland successfully defended its M < ii 
tie by running up 95 points to runnerup ( lemson's (, I ["he 
Terps scored in ever) evenl except the javelin and saw to < 
champions crowned in six of the 17 events. Tom Krueger, 
Maryland's senior miler, won his specialt) wink- other lerp 
winners were Lamb in the 440, Cole in the broad jump, Boh 
Vermillion in the intermediate hurdles. Steuart Markle) in 
the pole vault, and Walt Samora in the shot put. 

Once again, Maryland had a winning lacrosse team undei 
a new head coach for the first time since 1928. Al Heagy, 
who had been former coach Jack Faber's assistant foi 
years, assumed complete charge of the stickmen this year 
guiding them to an 11-3 record. Maryland was beaten onl) 
by Army and Navy (who were to battle for the national 
championship late in May) and Viginia — the latter's win 
being universally regarded as a distinct upset. Individually, 
the big news was that co-captain Bill Pettit se! a new career 
scoring record for Maryland attack men by scoring 41 times 
to run his three-year total goals to 103. The old mark was 
73. Pcttit's eight goals against Penn State was an individual 
game record for Maryland stickmen. Pettit won the Powell 
Award which goes to the player who had done most tor la- 
crosse. Fred Betz was adjudged the best midfielder and 
Jack Schofield the player most improved in defense. 

Another Maryland player established a new baseball record 
for Atlantic Coast Conference players when young Jim Pitt, 
160-pound sophomore from Baltimore, hit .460 to break the 
.449 record of Maryland's Tom Brown in l l 'n2. Pitt was one 
of several delights for Coach Jack Jackson who was experi- 
encing his first winning season. The Terps' 7-6 log in A( ( 
competition earned them third place in the Conference — 
behind undefeated North Carolina and Wake Forest. 1 hree 
pitchers had winning records: sophomores Steve Lipman win- 
ning his only start and seniors Jack Lund and Jerr\ Vezend) 
finishing with 2-0 and 2-1 records. Chris Sole, another soph, 
won 3 games but lost 5. Lipman's 2.00 was the best earned 
run average. 

Frank Cronin's golf team, which posted a 9-3-1 record, 
reached its peak al Columbia, S. C, where it played well 
enough to gain a share oi the Conference title with South 
Carolina. A 70 by Vcrn Novak. Maryland's number one man. 
was the lowest round oi the tournament. The Terrapins con- 
tinued invincible over their home course, winning six matches 
over it to run their streak to 40. Only a tie b) \ irginia in 
the last match of the 1963 season prevents the record from 
being an all-winning one over the Universit) Boulevard 
course. 

Boh McFerren. a soph, had the best individual record, win- 
ning 12 matches, tying one and losing one. His 72.8 aver- 
age also was the lowest. Cronin loses six seniors from this 
vear's team — Novak, McFerren. Ron Jamison. Ra\ Home, 
Pete Rivera and Mike Rota — but appears unworricd in the 
view of a great freshman team which should keep Maryland's 
golf banner ll\ ing high. 



July-October, 1964 



13 



Our 

Alumni 

Clergy 

Compiled by Geary F. Eppley 

DEAN EMERITUS 



Rev. Julius E. Ackerman, BPA '38 
327 La Salle 
Chicago, Illinois 

Rev. Lee W. Adkins, Agr. '42 
First Presbyterian Church 
Greensboro, North Carolina 

Rev. Richard M. Babcock, Educ. 

'58 
St. Paul Episcopal Church 
Prince Frederick, Maryland 

Bishop John Baden, Agr. '39 

(Episcopal) 

1 34 Boscawen Street 

Winchester, Virginia 

Rev. William Beal, A&S '48, '49 

(Episcopal) 

7020 Beechwood Drive 

Bethesda-Chevy Chase, Maryland 

Rabbi Herbert Birnbaum, D.Educ. 

'63 
3414 Devonshire Drive 
Baltimore 15, Maryland 



Rev. Emmert F. Bittinger, MA 

A&S '51 
Route 1 
Bridgewater, Virginia 

Rev. William Hampton Brady, 

A&S '35 
75 W. Div. Street 
Fond du Lac, Wisconsin 

Roger Burtner, Agr. '51 
Missionary Orientation Center 
Stoney Point, New York 

Rev. Albert C. Burton, A&S '59 

New St. Methodist Church, 

Box 188 

Shepherdstown, West Virginia 

Rev. Roland Clark, A&S '60-'61 
Episcopal Church 
Medina, Ohio 

Rev. Harry S. Cobey, Engr. '11 

(Episcopal) 

Box 628 

Hamlet, North Carolina 

John Milton Collins, Jr., A&S '59 

(Priest in Episcopal Church) 

14 Wolf Drive 

Silver Spring, Maryland 

Rev. Arthur Oliver Combs, Educ. 

'56 
Pulaski Highway, Route 272 
North East, Maryland 

Rev. Donald M. Davis, Jr., Educ. 
2821 Pembroke 
Ottawa Hills 
Toledo 6, Ohio 

Rev. Frank Smith Depro, LL.B. 

'36 
25816 Ridge Road 
Damascus, Maryland 

Rev. Herman A. diBrandi, A&S '49 

Rector, Church of our Saviour 

(Episcopal) 

560 N. Broadway & McElderry 

Baltimore 5, Maryland 

Rev. Charles B. Dillon, M.S., B.S. 

St. Joseph's College 

Mountain View 

Santa Clara County, California 

Rev. Merrill W. Drennan, A&S 

'50 
United Church of Christ 
12906 Larkin Place 
Rockville, Maryland 

Charles C. Eads, A&S '45 
Rock Spring Parish Rectory 
Forest Hills, Maryland 



Rev. James Redmond Eakin, A&S 

'54 
2721 Channing Way 
Berkeley 4, California 

Rev. Paul Thornton Eckel, A&S 

'56 
5919 Grayson Street 
Springfield, Virginia 22150 

Rev. George T. Eppley, Engr. '33 
Episcopal Mission — District of 

Hawaii 
Queen Emma Square 
Honolulu 13, Hawaii 

Rev. John T. Franey, Educ. '43 
St. Thomas Seminary 
RR#l,Box502C 

Louisville 7, Kentucky 

Chaplain Allen R. Fredine 
(Lt. Col.Ret.),U.C. '59 
121 N.W. Gladis Avenue 
Port Charlotte, Florida 33952 

Rev. Arthur A. Froehlich, Engr. 

'29 
(Episcopal) 
225 Emory Avenue 
Orlando, Florida 

Rev. William F. Groff, Jr., Agr. 

'52 
St. Georges, Delaware 

Rev. Esdras Stuart Gruver, A&S 

'33 
301 68th Street 

Newport News, Virginia 

Rev. Leighton E. Harrell, Jr., 

A&S '43 
(Chaplain, U.S.A.) 
310 N. 7th Street 
Indiana, Pennsylvania 

Rev. Frederick J. Haskin, Jr., A&S 

'36 
Enosburg Falls, Vermont 

Rev. Ned J. Heeter, A&S '57 
Rector, St. Matthew's Church, 

Episcopal 
133 Arch Street 
Sunbury, Pennsylvania 17801 

Rev. Raymond F. Hesler, A&S '43 
St. Charles College 

Catonsville 28, Maryland 

Rev. Daniel G. Higgins, Jr., A&S 

'52 
(Methodist) 

Crestwood, Crestwood Circle 
Salisbury, R.D., Maryland 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 



Rev. Jos. Emerson James, A&S '52 

(Episcopal) 

105 Bridge Street 

Elkton, Maryland 

Rev. Arthur E. Jehle, Engr. "44 

1 1 Emmet Avenue 

North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 

Rev. Innis LaRoche Jenkins, Ph.D. 

'60 
(Episcopal) 

7410 Columbia Avenue 
College Park, Maryland 

Rev. Edward D. Johnson. "92 
(Prot. Episcopal) 
Annapolis, Md. 

Rev. John Joseph Kenny, MA, A&S 

'60 
Priest-Instructor, St. John's College 
605 S. Chapelgate Lane St. 
Baltimore 29, Maryland 

Rev. William B. Lane, Jr., A&S '60 
5801 Harford Road 
Baltimore, Maryland 21214 

Rev. Charles L. Longest, A&S '56 
5008 Lindsay Road 
Baltimore 29, Maryland 

Rev. Richard Lee Loringer, A&S 

'54 
1001 Nottingham Road 
Newark, Delaware 

Rev. Mr. Malcolm J. Matthews, 

'56-'57 Grad. School 
(Episcopal) 
Christ Church 
Harrison & South Street 
Easton, Maryland 

James L. Miller, '56 
(Episcopal) 

Rev. James Woodrow Myers, A&S 

'40 
(Presbyterian) 
8420 Rambler Drive 
Hyattsville, Maryland 

Rev. Mr. Wm. Francis Myers, A&S 

'55 
Rector of Trinity Church, Episcopal 
2501 Fair Oaks Drive 
St. Charles, Missouri 

Rev. Vincent Oberle, Educ. '41 
St. Charles College 
Catonsville 28, Maryland 

July-October, 1964 



Rev. Win] ii i d H. Oppi card BP \ 

'52 
(Lutheran ) 
105 Olive Drive 
Trafford, Pennsylvania 

Rev. Lvi i F. Parrai i . I ngi 

(Episcopal) 

1011 Lynnette Drive 

Metarie, Louisiana 

Rev. Preston Littlepagi Peach, 

Engr. '03. Educ. '32 
(Methodist l 
970 Regent Park Dr. 
Pasadena 3. California 

Rev. Joseph Peaslee, Agr. '39 

(Lutheran ) 

5612 Gushman Street 

Sylvania, Ohio 

Rev. Mr. August W. Peters, Jr., 

Educ. '57 
1 10 Jackson Drive 
Williamsport, Maryland 

Rev. J. Lawrence Plumley, BPA 

'33 
(Cannon — Episcopal ) 
908 Rutherford 
Shreveport, Louisiana 

Rev. Walter P. Plumley, A&S '29 

(Episcopal) 

East Main & Church Sts. 

Leroy, New York 14482 

Rev. Chapl. Col. Cecil Loy 

Propst, A&S '27 
Rector, Epiphany Lutheran Church 
407 Roberts Rd. — Woodlawn Manor 
Alexandria, Virginia 

Rev. Carl A. Rieck, Agr. '50 

(Lutheran) 

Box 55 

Preston, Maryland 

Rev. Clarence L. Roark III, A&S 

'59 
Minister, Stone Chapel Methodist 

Church, New Windsor 
6 A Bemont Avenue 
Baltimore 28. Maryland 

Rev. Robert K. Rodeffer, P. Educ. 

'54 
Prince Frederick, Maryland 

Rabbi Moses B. Sacks, A&S '40 
Congregation, B'Nai Abraham 
4700 Highway #7 
St. Louis Park 16, Minnesota 



Ki \ Wii I 1AM I' Sampsi I i 

1 1 
101 \ i nion Vvenue 
H.i\ re d< Gi Maryland 

R.E\ dl i ss \\ SAMUELSON I) 

I due. 60 
i Baptist ) 

field Rd 
King oi Prussia, Pennsylvania 

Rev. ( I'nii ip si i rzi r \ 
i l utheran i 
4573 Union Road 
Miamisburg, ( >hi i 

Rl v. J. I'm i Si i i/i r, \\s 54 
(Lutheran i 
13 Last Mam Street 
Middletown, Maryland 

Rev. Roberi W. Sonen, Engr. '34 
( Presbyterian ) 
5133 Ri\ iera Drive 

Coral Gables 40. Florida 

Rev. Benjamin T. Simnks. \\S '4 l > 

( Episcopal ) 

9 Houston Street 

Ashcville, North Carolina 

Rev. Lloyd Foard Umbargi k. P 

Educ. '54 
Westminster Presbyterian Church 
West Chester. Pennsylvania 

Rev. Lathrop P. Utley, A&S '5 1 

( Episcopal ) 

1 16 South Sussex Street 

Gloucester City. New Jersey 

Rev. John C. Walker, A&S '51 
7800 Beach Tree Road 
Bethesda 14. Maryland 

Rev. Henry J. Whiting, A&S '31 

(Lutheran ) 

37 Brunswick Road 

Montclair. New Jersey 

Rev. Charles P. WlLHEl m. Agr. 

'21. MS '22 
Box 66 
KingWOOd, West Virginia 

REV. Herman H. Wii son. I LB. '17 

(Methodist) 

101 Walker Avenue 

Gaithersburg, Mar) land 

NOIL: The University is interested in 
maintaining a file of iis alumni who are 
in the service of the Church. Such infoi 
mation should be sent u> the Alumni Office, 
Universitj of Maryland .it ( ollege l'.nk it 
should list name, school and year, title and 
church or synagogue, current address 

15 



Maryland's Women Engineering Graduates 



The College of Engineering of the University 
of Maryland granted its first bachelor's degree in engi- 
neering in 1898 to a man who was the only member of 
that graduating class in engineering. 

Thirty-four years later, in 1932, Maryland graduated its 
first woman engineer, Evelyn B. Harrison, in a class of 
40. During these 34 years, 517 men had earned bachelor's 
degrees in engineering. During the next 31 years, Mary- 
land granted 3,593 bachelor's degrees in engineering but 
only eleven to women. The most recent one, Joan E. Rod- 
erick, graduated in 1963, the only woman in a class of 229. 

Miss Harrison, Maryland's first woman engineering 
graduate, now is Deputy Director, Bureau of Programs 
and Standards, of the United States Civil Service Commis- 
sion. ( Who's Who of American Women lists her engineer- 
ing experience.) She is in a position to know the nation's 
needs for engineers — men and women. Recently she 
wrote, "Estimates of future manpower requirements at 
the national level indicate that new entrants into engineer- 
ing will have to be substantially increased . . . for the 
foreseeable future. This promises rewarding careers for 
both men and women students." She added that in her 
own case "the abilities developed through such (engineer- 
ing) training have proven invaluable." 

We decided to find out what Maryland's twelve women 
engineering graduates are doing and what abilities they 
thought it took to become an engineer. 

We found that the twelve are scattered from coast to 
coast, with three in the New York and four in the Wash- 
ington-Baltimore areas. One each lives in Florida, Michi- 
gan, and Texas, and two in California. Nine of the twelve 
are married; and eight married engineers. 

What advice would they give to others who are consid- 
ering engineering as a career? Dorothy Wedeman 
Olinger, '60, a design engineer for an aircraft company 
says that "the road is not an easy one but the sense of 
satisfaction is great. . . ." Sharon L. Henderson, '60, 
an electronic engineer for the Manned Spacecraft Center 

Miss Joan Roderick, '63, Structural Mechanical 
Engineer at the David Taylor Model Basin. 





Miss Evelyn Harrison, '32, Deputy Director, Bureau of Programs 
and Standards, of the United States Civil Service Commission. 

of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 
took time from her stimulating job to write that "the 
glamour of engineering . . . takes very 'unglamorous' 
hard work and studying to become an engineer." Joan 
E. Roderick, '63, a structural engineer at the David 
Taylor Model Basin finds her work "very exciting." 
She recommends that students find summer employment 
for experience in the particular field of engineering in 
which they are interested. Joan is currently doing part- 
time graduate work in engineering. Faith Stuart Li- 
belo, '60, a housewife and mother of three sons, is also 
doing graduate work. Janice Kelly Martin, '57, who 
looks after an infant daughter, believes that students should 
work in their chosen profession during summers. As an 
undergraduate, Janice worked two summers in engineer- 
ing offices of oil companies. Mattie Moorhead Wilcox, 
'48, a housewife and mother of two daughters, advises stu- 
dents to be sure that engineering is the career they want. 
Who's Who of American Women summarizes the success- 
ful engineering career of Miriam Kleeger Gerla, '44. 
At present Miriam's two children keep her at home, but 
later she plans to resume her engineering work. She be- 
lieves that "perseverence, regardless of discouraging in- 
fluences, is a necessity for women in this field." 

Would they study engineering if they had it to do over 
again? Joan Earle Mattie, '57, who is busy with her 
two-and-one-half year-old child says "yes." Suzanne 
Hildabolt Brewer, '60, who works as a mechanical en- 
gineer in a space-age firm says "absolutely yes." Gail 
Wisser Salzman, '58, writes, "It has afforded me a very 
challenging and interesting career which I plan to continue 
actively at a later time." (Just now three daughters are 
Gail's fulltime job.) Charlotte Schellhas Wester- 
field, '52, who manages two daughters and a son, states 
that "yes, definitely" she would choose engineering again; 
and she adds, "Stay with it no matter how difficult the situ- 
ation either financially, socially, or academically. It is 
worth any trouble to be scientifically creative." 

So that's the story. Engineering does offer challenging 
opportunities for women as well as men. For both it in- 
volves learning with a purpose and putting that learning 
to practical use. As with women in any field, the work of 
a women engineering graduate may be interrupted by 
home-centered duties as wife and mother — in eight cases 
out of nine among Maryland graduates, duties which are 
shared by engineering husbands. Would Maryland's 
women engineering graduates do it over again? The re- 
sponses of graduates of more than 30 years is an over- 
whelming "yes". 

the Maryland Magazine 



Some Recent Grants 

For research on cosmic ray monitor- 
ing at Hallett Station, Antarctica. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

$32,700. 

To continue study of infections trans- 
mitted in dental offices by the com- 
mon staph organism. 

U. S. PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE TO 
SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 

$8,500. 

For support of an undergraduate 

science education program. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

$7,250. 

To finance expansion of instruction in 

child welfare. 

CHILDREN'S BUREAU OF U.S. DEPART- 
MENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND 
WELFARE TO SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK 

$30,281. 

For support of research on fluid dy- 
namics and applied mathematics. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
INSTITUTE FOR FLUID DYNAMICS AND 
APPLIED MATHEMATICS 

$82,000. 

For a project on the isolation and 

transfer of pathogenic micrococci. 

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DENTAL RE- 
SEARCH TO DEPARTMENT OF MICRO- 
BIOLOGY, SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
$9,132. 

To provide funds for research on 
unbounded linear operators in normed 
linear space. 

U.S. AIR FORCE TO DEPARTMENT OF 

MATHEMATICS 

$15,144. 

For support of an undergraduate 
science education program. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS AND ASTRON- 
OMY 
$25,200. 

For study of mandibular positions by 
electromyography. 

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DENTAL RE- 
SEARCH TO DEPARTMENT OF PHYSIOL- 
OGY, SCHOOL OF DENTISTRY 
$9,943. 

For support of research on properties 
in the large of vector fields and 
foliations. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 
DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 
$27,500. 

For support of an undergraduate 
science education program. 

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION TO 

DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

$14,700. 

For an investigation on the effect 
of local irritants on oral tissues. 

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DENTAL RE- 
SEARCH TO DEPARTMENTS OF PATHOL- 
OGY AND PHYSIOLOGY, SCHOOL OF DEN- 
TISTRY 
$27,940. 



Dean Mc( larth) Awarded an I [onoran 
Degree from Texas Wesleyan Colleee 




DR. HARRY B. MCCARTHY, D.D.S. '23, 
B.S. '46, M.A. '48, Dean of the 
College of Dentistry at Baylor Univer- 
sity College of Dentistry in Dallas, 
Texas, received an honorary Doctor of 
Laws Degree from Texas Wesleyan 
College, Fort Worth, on May 24. 

Dr. McCarthy is a native of Vermont 
and received his secondary education 
in the public schools of that state. He 
studied law, finance, economics and 
accounting with Pace and Pace Insti- 
tute of New York before beginning the 
study of dentistry. 

He entered the School of Dentistry of 
the University of Maryland, Baltimore, 
graduating with honors in 1923, and re- 
turned to the University after gradua- 
tion as a full-time instructor in opera- 
tive dentistry. He served in various 
positions on the faculty at Maryland, 
including Professor of Clinical Opera- 
tive Dentistry and later, as Director of 
Clinics. 

Dr. McCarthy has taken an active 
part in local, state and national dental 
society activities. He is past presi- 
dent of the Baltimore City Dental Soci- 
ety, the Maryland State Dental Asso- 
ciation, the National Alumni Association 
of the Dental School of the University 
of Maryland and the National Alumni 
Chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon 
Scholastic Honor Society. He was the 
official delegate of the Maryland State 
Dental Association to the International 
Dental Congress held in Paris in 1931. 
In 1958, Dr. McCarthy was the recipi- 
ent of the Distinguished Alumnus 
Award from the University of Mary- 
land, being the second dentist to re- 
ceive this honor. He has served as 
president of the National Alumni Asso- 
ciation of Psi Omega Fraternity and as 
president of the American Academy of 
the History of Dentistry. From 1 95 1 
to 1955, Dr. McCarthy was a member 



oi tin- ( mm reaching ol the 

American \ ociatioo ol D 
Schools 

He has contributed nui mi 

cles to dental journals and h 
man} lectures and clinics throughout 
the i nited States and in Pu< i I 
I le in co authoi oi a book, R> 
Dentisti \. published bj the < \ M 
bj < ompany, He served foi lix 
as ( hairman ol the ludicial < ouncil ol 
the American Dental \ o ition and 
served for five years as the dental 
membei oi the President's ( ommittee 
ol the Office oi Defense Mobilization, 
Health. Resources and Advisor) Com- 
mission, 

In addition to his other activities 

during his teaching career at Mary- 
land. Dr. McCarthy took work in the 

Graduate School and became the first 
dentist to earn both the Bachelor of 
Science and Master of Arts degrees in 
Dental Education. In Mas. 1952. he re- 
signed his position at the University ol 
Maryland and came to Dallas to as- 
sume the Deanship of Baylor Univer- 
sity College of Dentistry. 

Dr. McCarthy is listed in Who's Who 
in America. 

In 1962, the tenth anniversary oi his 
coming to Baylor, Dean McCarthy re- 
ceived citations from the Board oi 
Trustees of Baylor University and from 
the Baylor Dental Alumni Association 
for his outstanding accomplishments 
with the College of Dentistry. 

Dr. McCarthy has served as Area 
Dental Consultant to the 12 Veterans 
Administration Hospitals in the South- 
western area and as co-chairman of the 
American Dental Association meeting 
held in Dallas in 1958. 

In addition to his many activities in 
dentistry. Dr. McCarthy has also been 
very active in civic activities, serving 
in official capacities in community fund 
drives and Red Cross activities. He is 
a past member of the Boy Scouts and 
has been a Boy Scout Master. He is a 
member of the Dallas Chamber ol 
Commerce and serves on their Health 
Committee, and is a member ol the 
Health Council of the Council oi Social 
Agencies of Dallas. 

He is a member of the Methodist 
Church, taught a boys' Sunday School 
(lass for main years and was presi- 
dent of the Young People's group 
known as the Epworth League <M y. 
F.). He is a 32nd degree Mason and 
a member of the Shrine. He is mar- 
ried to the former Helen Knowles, of 
Seaford, Delaware, and they have one 
daughter, loan, who is the wife ot 
Dr. A. L. Jenkines of Weslaco, lexas 



July-October, 1964 



17 




$l)f 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



OCTOBER 

3 Football, N. Carolina State, 

Away 
10 Football, Duke, Away 
13 Soccer, Penn State, Home 

17 Football, N. Carolina, Away 

24 Football, Wake Forest, Home 

(Band Day) 
24 Track, N. Carolina State Cross 

Country, Home 
27 Soccer, Georgetown, Home 
31 Football, Penn State, Away 
NOVEMBER 

4 Soccer, Navy, Home 
7 IFC Presents 



7 Football, Navy, Home 
(Parents Day) 

10 University Symphony Orchestra 

Ritchie Coliseum 

1 1 Soccer, Duke, Home 

14 Football, Clemson, Home 

(Homecoming) 
19 Goldovsky Grand Opera, 

"La Boheme", Ritchie Coliseum 
21 Football, Virginia, Away 
25 Thanksgiving Recess Begins 

After Last Class 
30 Thanksgiving Recess Ends, 

8 a.m. 

DECEMBER 

2 Basketball, Penn State, Home 



3 Basketball, George Washington, 
Home 

8 Basketball, N. Carolina, Home 

9 Swimming, Villanova, Home 
10 National Symphony, SGA, 

Ritchie Coliseum 
12 Basketball, W. Virginia, Home 
12 Wrestling, Army, Home 
17 Wrestling, Virginia, Home 

17 Christmas Program (Glee Clubs, 

Bass Choir) 

18 Basketball, Wake Forest, Home 

19 Basketball, U. of Kansas, Home 
22 Christmas Recess Begins After 

Last Class 
28-29 Basketball, Hurricane 
Classic, Miami 



New Alumni Officers are Elected 



Erna R. Chapman, prominent club- 
woman and home economist, has as- 
sumed the presidency of the University 
of Maryland Alumni Association. She 
is the second woman to be elected to 
head the 72 year-old organization for 
Maryland's 50,000 alumni. 

At the same time, Judge Joseph L. 
Carter, of Baltimore and Mylo S. Dow- 
ney, of College Park assumed the posts 
of Vice President. 

Col. J. Logan Schutz, newly appointed 
University Director of Alumni Affairs, 
will serve as Secretary-treasurer and 
Victor Holm, alumni field secretary, 
will assist during the coming year. 

Mrs. Chapman, who succeeds out- 
going Association President Dr. Edward 
Stone, has been associated with the Dis- 
trict of Columbia Public School System 
since 1938 and is currently in-charge of 
home economics for elementary, junior 
and senior high schools and adult lev- 
els. 



She holds both the bachelor and mas- 
ter degrees from the University's Col- 
lege of Home Economics and also at- 
tended the University of Indiana, D.C. 
Teachers College, Cornell and Ohio 
State Universities. 

The holder of numerous honors and 
awards, Mrs. Chapman was named the 
University of Maryland outstanding 
alumna in the field of home economics 
in 1962. 

She is a member of the American 
Home Economics Association, a past 
corresponding secretary and life 
member of Phi Delta Gamma, a past 
President of the District of Columbia 
chapter of the American National Asso- 
ciation, and past legislative chairman of 
the Annapolis branch of the American 
Association of University Women. 

She is currently a Director of the 
North Atlantic Region for the Depart- 
ment of Economics of the National 
Education Association and a member 



Incorporated 1847 

Eutaw 
Savings Bank 

eutaw and fayette streets 
5 Convenient Offices 

• 

Free, Spacious Parking 

At All Locations 

assets Over $110,000,000 



Member Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 



of Soroptimist International of Severn 
Run. 

Her distaff counterpart in the Alumni 
Association's top post was Betty Rohr 
Singleton, who was President in 1960. 

Judge Carter, who graduated from 
the School of Law in 1925, has been a 
member of the Supreme Bench of Bal- 
timore City since 1952. Prior to that 
time, he practiced law privately in 
Baltimore. A native of Allegany 
County, he served as an assistant U. S. 
District Attorney from 1932 until 1934. 

Mr. Downey, a member of the Col- 
lege of Agriculture Class of 1927, has 
had a distinguished career in State and 
national 4-H Club work. He is presently 
Director of the division of 4-H Club 
and YMW programs for the Federal 
Extension Service. 



Engineering Fund to 
Honor Prof. Corcoran 

Engineering alumni and faculty of the 
University of Maryland have established 
a Fund for Engineering Education and 
Development in honor of the late Pro- 
fessor George F. Corcoran, Head of the 
Department of Engineering for 22 
years. 

Professor Corcoran, who died re- 
cently in Gainesville, Florida, was con- 
sidered one of the nation's leading en- 
gineering authors and educators. He 
was the recipient of the national edu- 
cational award in 1961 from the Amer- 
ican Institute of Electrical Engineering. 
An expert in the field of active network 
analysis and synthesis, he was the au- 
thor of numerous textbooks, including 
Basic Electrical Engineering. 

He received his B.S. degree from 
South Dakota State College in 1923, 
and an honorary Doctor of Science De- 
gree from South Dakota in 1962. He 
was awarded his M.S. degree in 1926 
at the University of Minnesota. Profes- 
sor Corcoran was an Instructor at Kan- 
sas State College; Associate Professor at 
the State University of Iowa where he 
was also Professor of Electrical Engi- 
neering; and finally. Professor of Elec- 
trical Engineering and Chairman of the 
Department at the University of Mary- 
land. 

Professor Corcoran served as Consult- 
ant for the American Council on Edu- 
cation and was a member of the Amer- 
ican Society of Engineering Education, 
American Association of University 
Professors, Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi. 
Tau Beta Pi, Sigma Tau, Eta Kappa 
Nu, and Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

A goal of $50,000 has been set up for 
the memorial fund which will be ad- 
ministered by a board of trustees made 
up of engineering alumni. 

Serving as fund trustees during the 
coming year are Tracy C. Coleman, 
'35, President; Arnold A. Korab, '38, 



Secretary; George (). Weber, 
Treasurer; Alvin I . Aubinoe 26 Ma 
thews J. Haspert, '37; and Seymoui I) 
Wolf, '42. University President Wilson 
H. Elkins and 1 ngineering Dean I red 
eric T. Mavis, will serve as ex-officio 
members of the board 

While all electrical engineering 
alumni will be personally contacted, 
contributions from other sources to 
FEEDUM. the abbreviated name ol the 
Corcoran fund, can be made through 
P. O. Box 371. College Park. 



Montgomery County Alumni 
Club Annual Meeting 

On the bright, sunm Saturday after- 
noon of August 15, the Montgomery 

County Alumni Club conducted its an- 
nual family picnic-meeting at the beau- 
tiful Springbrook home of Judge Ralph 
G. Shure, A&S '32. 

A good turnout of the membership 
and their families enjoyed the gracious 
hospitality of Ralph and Helen Shure. 
The athletically inclined splashed in the 
swimming pool, tossed horseshoes, 
played badminton and other games. 
while others preferred a cool tall one 
in the shade. 

All concerned thoroughly enjoyed 
reminiscing and discussing the "good 
old days" on campus. Recent news on 
former classmates was enthusiastically 
exchanged. 

Following an abundant, delicious pic- 
nic meal, featuring barbecued chicken, 
the annual business meeting and elec- 
tion of officers was held in the refresh- 
ing shade of the numerous trees of the 
Shure estate. The officers for the com- 
ing year will be Tom Russell, Engr. '53, 
President; Bob Beale, A&S '31, Vice 
President; George Clendenin, DDS '29, 
Second Vice President; Dave Brigham. 
A&S '38. Secretary; Jake Sclar, BPA 
'34, Treasurer; "Chicken" Kricker, HEc 
'31, Alumni Council Representative: 
Charles Merrick, A&S '26. Alternate 
Council Representative. Board mem- 
bers elected were Joe Mathias. A&S 
'35; Bill Vogel, Engr' 51; Fred Louden 
LLB '49; Don Boyd, Agr '43; Ralph 
Shure. A&S '32; Roy Bridger, DDS '26; 
Warren Rabbitt, A&S '31 and Ralph 
Bernardo. A&S '49. 

The club membership voted a grant 
of $200.00 to be used at the discretion 
of the Director of Student Aid at the 
University for a deserving Montgomery 
County student. The Club treasurer 
also was authorized to provide $395.00 
to donate 50 volumes of "Great Books 
of the Western World" to the Univer- 
sity Library in the name of the Mont- 
gomery County Alumni Club. 

Following the meeting and lingering 
good-byes to old friends, the member- 
ship departed homeward with pleasant 
memories of a delightful afternoon. 



Alumni I ngaged in Research 
at Bureau ol Standards 

s ientists ,ii the National H 
Standards, I s I >i partmenl • I < 
merce, are study ii 
ei ties ol crystalline refra •■ 
in theoretical methods and experii 
i.il techniques In tins w< ■ 
investigating imperfections such 

tions and point defects, and thi 
fects these imperfections have on the 
physical properties ol crystalline 
uls Recent!) i>i I it Wachtn Ii 
I'h I ) \,VS 61 and his co-work( I 
the Bureau completed an investigation 
concerned with point delects in which 
both the mechanical and electrical ; i 
erties ol thorial 1 1>< ) i and the mechan- 
ical properties ol rutile < 1 1 ( > ' were 
measured and compared I he result- 
ing daia are m good agreement with 
theoretical equations relating *.i\st.d 
properties u> defects; they thus pro- 
vide a convincing check on the theory 

A relatively accurate method foi pre- 
dicting the equation ol slate ol simple 
gases at high densities and lor extrapo- 
lating existing measurements into un- 
explored regions is now in use at the 
NBS Institute tor Basic Standards to 
develop the method. Max Klein. I'h I) 
A&S. '62 and M. S. Green ol the Insti- 
tute applied integral equations to the 
equation of state of a Quid in one ol the 
most extensive computations of this type 
ever made. Although not the final an- 
swer to the important problem ol re- 
lating the molecular forces to the equa- 
tion of state in a dense gas. this work 
— based on the hypernetted chain inte- 
gral equation — gives an excellent qual- 
itative and a good quantitative picture 
of the equation of state. 



Alumnus is Author of 
New Engineering Text 

Dr. Irving H. Shames. Ph.D. '53, Ap- 
plied Mechanics, is author ol a new 
book. Mechanics of Deformable Solids. 
published recently by Prentice-Hall. 
Inc., of New Jersey . 

The book, a fundamental study on 
deformable solids, was written to serve 
as an introduction in science-oriented 
engineering programs. 

Part I, "Fundamentals of the I heor\ 
of Elasticity," deals primarily with the 
linear elastic body from a Cartesian 
tensor continuum viewpoint. I his pro- 
vides a greater understanding ol the 
formulations ol Strength of materials 
which comprise Part II. "Analysis ol 
Beams, Shafts and Columns; 1 nergy 
Methods." in which the singularity func- 
tions the delta function, the step func- 
tion, and the doublet function are used 
extensively. Energy methods are pre- 
sented so as to provide a smooth tran- 



July-October, 1964 



19 



sition from early efforts in earlier me- 
chanics courses to a point where new 
concepts and formulations will be avail- 
able for more sophisticated energy tech- 
niques involving variational calculus. 

Dr. Shames is presently Professor 
and Head of the Division of Interdisci- 
plinary Studies and Research in Engi- 
neering at the State University of New 
York in Buffalo. He is also author of 
Engineering Mechanics — Statics and 
Dynamics and Mechanics of Fluids. 



Oyster Bowl Rally 

On October 16th a pre-Oyster Bowl 
Rally of Alumni in the greater Norfolk 
area was held at the Bay Harbour Club, 
Virginia Beach. 

The program began with a buffet, 
followed by an interesting talk by Head 
Coach, Tom Nugent, who reviewed the 
football season to date and showed film 
highlights of previous games. 

In attendance at the rally were Presi- 




de 



Swede" Eppley Retires 



Dean Geary F. Eppley was hon- 
ored recently by more than 500 
friends at a testimonial banquet at In- 
dian Spring Country Club, on the occa- 
sion of his retiring as Dean of Men at 
the University of Maryland. 

Dean Eppley and his wife were pre- 
sented a trip to Tokyo to attend the 
fall Olympics. 

Mr. Eppley, the first Dean of Men at 
the University, served as supervisor of 
the Student Government Association 
for 30 years. He was also former 
athletic director, faculty chairman of 
athletics, trackman and track coach. 

At the dinner, a new University ath- 
letic award was established in Mr. Ep- 
pley's honor. It will go to the graduat- 
ing senior lettering in at least one sport, 
who has attained the highest academic 
average during his college career. 
Dean Eppley also received the Atlantic 
Coast Sports Writers' Service to Sports 



Award for "long, distinguished and un- 
selfish service to amateur athletics." 

Toastmaster at the affair was Colo- 
nel Thomas Fields, head of the G-2 Di- 
vision, Headquarters Marine Corps, 
who was a track star under coach Ep- 
pley. 

W. W. Cobey, Athletic Director at the 
University, presented Dean Eppley with 
an "Athletic Council Award" citing him 
as "athlete, coach, athletic director, 
and faculty chairman of athletics, 1914- 
1964." The plaque was inscribed with 
the words, "We thank God we've had 
this man with us so many years." 

The University Alumni Council in a 
resolution honoring Dean Eppley said, 
". . . . The Alumni Council recognizes 
(his) great service, his exceptional 
effort, and above all, the constant 
friendship of a truly capable and un- 
tiring leader." 



dent Elkins, Erna Chapman, President 
of the Alumni Association, numerous 
alumni from the Norfolk area and 
members of the Terrapin Club. 

The Program Chairmen for the event 
were Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Arris, BPA 
'57 and Nurs '57, and Mr. and Mrs. 
Edward K. Phillips, M.Ed '55. 

Alumni Council Meets 

On September 25, the Alumni Council 
of the University of Maryland Alumni 
Association met at the Student Union 
on the College Park campus for their 
first business meeting of the academic 
year. Mrs. Erna R. Chapman, Presi- 
dent, opened the meeting with the fol- 
lowing remarks: 

"I would like to call the meeting to 
order, welcome all of you and tell how- 
very pleased we are that so many of you 
were able to be with us tonight. As 
many of you know, this is my very first 
opportunity to thank the members of 
the Council for electing me to serve as 
your president, and I do so with great 
humility. I shall try to serve you to the 
best of my ability. However, I am well 
aware of the fact that no president can 
go very far without the support of the 
group whom he is representing. But I 
do know that I have your support, so I 
think we can look forward to a year of 
quite a bit of activity. I hope all of you 
will think very seriously of the responsi- 
bility that has been entrusted in you in 
representing your various colleges and 
your various groups. I think it is a real 
responsibility. It should be one which 
will be pleasurable for you, but at the 
same time I know that those who have 
elected you look forward to your repre- 
senting them." 

After the roll call, approval of pre- 
vious minutes and the treasurer's report, 
Mrs. Chapman proceeded to the busi- 
ness of committee assignments for the 
coming year. Nine committees were 
charged with various duties concerning 
the different areas of interest of the 
Alumni Council. 

The schedule of Council meetings for 
the year was approved. The next meet- 
ing will be held in the Student Union in 
Baltimore on December 4. The Febru- 
ary 12, 1965, meeting will be held in 
College Park, and the deans of the 
various schools will be invited to attend 
and give a report on the activities within 
their colleges. The annual meeting will 
be held in College Park on June 11. 
The annual picnic will take place on 
June 26. 

The program for Homecoming on 
November 14, was approved by the 
Council. Along with the football game 
with Clemson, the day will spotlight an 
alumni luncheon at the Student Union, 
a golf and bowling contest in the morn- 
ing, and a coffee hour at the new Center 
for Adult Education after the game. 
Preliminary meetings will also be held 
for the reunion classes which will be 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



featured at Spring Reunion on May 15, 
1965. 

Mrs. Chapman requested that the 
committee dealing with dues continue 
the work done by last year's committee 
and make recommendations concerning 
modifications in the dues structure. She 
also noted the appointment of the 
special committee to review the Alumni 
constitution and revise it as may be 
required. 

Council approval was given to several 
proposals concerning Alumni chapters 
and clubs. Each chapter or club will be 
requested to present a schedule of its 
planned activities for the year 1964-65. 
Each group is also asked to designate 
one of its members to serve as a corre- 
spondent to provide information for 
publication in the Maryland Magazine 
and the Alumni Bulletin. 

The University Bulletin and the 
Alumni Newsletter will be combined 
in a single publication to be called the 
Alumni Bulletin. This action will re- 
duce costs and provide a better publica- 
tion which will go to all alumni and the 
faculty of the University. 

The Council also appropriated suffi- 
cient money to cover the cost of re- 
placing the Alumni Awards plaque in 
the College of Education. 



Alumni Director Awarded 
Legion of Merit 

Colonel J. Logan Schutz, Director of the 
Office of Alumni Relations, has been 
awarded a second Oakleaf Cluster to 
the Legion of Merit. Presentation was 
made by Lieutenant General Gordon 
A. Blake, USAF, Director of the Na- 
tional Security Agency, Fort Meade, 
Maryland. 




Agency. His citation reads in part 
"Colonel Schutz' inspiring leadei 
professional competence, and dedicated 
devotion to duty were evidenced by the 
optimum results throughout the wide 
and diverse scope ol Ins responsibili 

A graduate ot the University ol 
Maryland, College Park, Maryland, 
Colonel Schutz left the University to 
join the Army 24 years ago. He re 
tired from the Arm) this yeai and re 
turned to the University to serve as the 
Director of Alumni Allans. 

His work brings him into contact 
with a large number ol military per- 
sonnel associated with the University 
who have received their degrees through 
the Bootstrap Program or as the result 
of courses taken at the University's 
numerous overseas and ZI branches. 




Col. Schutz received the award for 
his outstanding service to his country 
during his years with the Seventh Army 
in Europe; Commanding Officer, 1st 
Battle Group 8th Cavalry, the 1st 
Cavalry Division in Korea; Chief of 
Staff, XX U. S. Army Corps, Fort 
Hayes, Ohio; and the National Security 



The Alumni Office encourages all 
alumni to forward personal news 
items concerning themselves or their 
contemporaries. Such correspondence 
should be directed to Col. J. Logan 
Schutz, Director of the Office of 
Alumni Affairs, Administration Build- 
ing, University of Maryland at Col- 
lege Park. 

1895-1919 

Talmot Denmead, ll.b. '00, who 
served as editor of the Maryland Con- 
servationist for ten years, as well as its 
assistant lawyer, nows enjoys his re- 
tirement in Annapolis. Mr. Denmead 
played on the University's ice hockey 
team when they reigned as state cham- 
pions for two consecutive years. 

Dr. Ralph Gibson Perry, Sr., md. 
'01, resident of Wells River, Vermont, 
was honored by the New Hampshire 
State Medical Society for his 50 years 
of practice in that state. The award 
was presented at the annual meeting 
of the Home of the Delegates in Con- 
cord, New Hampshire. 



1920-1929 

Dr. Frederick R. Darkis, a&s, '24, 
Vice President and Director of Re- 
search in Liggett and Myers Tobacco 
Company, retired July 2<S, 1964. The 
Frederick, Maryland native bad been 
the recipient of numerous awards dur- 
ing his career, the latest the Southern 
Chemists' Award of 1962. 



I'llll I IP Hi I I I R S\( MS I I 

( h. nun. in ni the ' ' i 

Authority ol Maryland, hi 
pointed bj < Sov< rnoi J Millai i 
in a new five yeai term, t 
i. I9i 

\i \ in M Pari 
President and I reasuri 
& ( travel ( ompany ol i 
recently made directoi ol the \< 
bank m \\ ashington 

Robi ki I I \ \ns m i biel 

ol the Physics Division ol the I sited 
States Patenl Office, Washington, I) I 



1930-1939 

( Hi ks wt \i \( i \^s ui Dorcl 
ter County State's Attorney, has been 
sworn in to the county circuit court 
bench to till the remaining term ol 
Judge W. laird Henry Jr. who re- 
signed this March. Judge Mace, who 
has long been active in the Mars land 
Democratic organization, is expected to 
seek a full term in 1966. 

Gordon K. Zimmerman, a&s '32, 
of Alexandria. Virginia, was named an 
honorary member ol the Soil ( onserva- 
tion Society of America. As the execu- 
tive secretary of the National Associa- 
tion of Soil and Water Conservation 
Districts, he is a veteran of the soil 
conservation movement and its appli- 
cation in the United States. 

J. William. Siiinik. i\i,h. '34. 
has been named Director ot Operations 
of Wakefield lighting and Art Metal 
Lighting Divisions ol Wakefield ( orpo- 
ration, Detroit. Michigan. Before his 
appointment to the new l> -created post. 
Steiner served as president ami gen- 
eral manager of the division. 

Theodore H. I RBI . \\s '36, (II. 
a life member of the Million Dollar 
Round Table, was awarded a special 
plaque for his life production leadership 
among all Travelers Insurance Com- 
pany agents in the nation and Canada 
on June 22, 1964 in Baltimore. Man- 
kind. 

Dr. Thomas S. Sexton, m.d. '39, 
vice president and chief medical direc- 
tor of Massachusetts Mutual 1 ile In- 
surance Company, was named medical 
director's representative of the 1 ile In- 
surance Medical Research Fund. 1 he 
fund makes grants to established insti- 
tutions with basic facilities lor medical 
research, devoted to the aid ol prob- 
lems related to cardiovascular disease 



1940-1949 

Irwin J. SCHUMACHER, ENGR. '42. 
was honored by the U S. Armv Mobil- 
ity Command's Engineer Research and 
Development laboratories. I oil Bel- 
voir, Virginia, on the occasion oi his 
promotion as a power plant engineer 
in the Engine Branch. 



July-October, 1964 



:i 



Mrs. William Stevens, (Mr. Stev- 
ens, agr. '43,) mother of eight chil- 
dren, graduated from Dumbarton Col- 
lege in Washington, D. C. in June of 
1964. 

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph, M. Decker, 
engr. '47, h.ec. '44, are now residing 
in Glendale, Arizona, where Mr. 
Decker is president of Decker Vendors 
Inc. The couple have four children. 

James, A. Clark, engr. '44, m.a. 
'48, former teacher at Maryland, has 
been appointed as assistant vice presi- 
dent of the Scientific Instrument Divi- 
sion of Bausch and Lomb Inc.. Roches- 
ter, New York. Previously he worked 
for the Ahrendt Instrument Company 
as its chief engineer. 

James J. Gill, m.e. '47, has been as- 
signed to the Physics Division of the 
United States Patent Office. He has 
been in this office since 1955, and his 
present specialty is in the area of ac- 
celerometers and speed recording and 
distance measuring devices. 

Herman Gustav Schroeder, a&s 
'49, was among those students receiving 
degrees of Master of Christian Educa- 
tion at the 1964 Commencement of 
Wesley Theological Seminary, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

John C. Bouma, b.a. '48, m.a. '49, 
a marketing specialist in the Transpor- 
tation and Facilities Research Division 
of the Department of Agriculture, was 
presented with a Superior Service 
Award May 19, 1964, by Secretary of 
Agriculture Orville L. Freeman. 

Dr. Russell M. Kulsrud, a&s '49, 
has been appointed head of the Plasma 
Physics Laboratory's Theoretical Di- 
vision at Princeton University's James 
Forrestal Research Center. Since 1954, 
Dr. Kulsrud has contributed extensively 
to the University's research program, 
as well as lectured in the Department 
of Astrophysical Sciences in a cosmi- 
cal electrodynamics course. 

Thomas, J. Holden, engr. '49, ll.b. 
'54, was elected vice president in charge 
of contracts at the annual board meet- 
ing of Aircraft Armaments, Inc. of 
Cockeysville, Maryland. Mr. Holden 
was registered to practice in the U. S. 
Patent Office in 1952, and was admit- 
ted to the Bar in 1954; he is a member 
of the National Association of Corpo- 
rate Secretaries, and the Contract Ne- 
gotiations Subcommittee of the Na- 
tional Security Industrial Association. 

Paul, A. Pumpian, a&s '48, pharm. 
'50, secretary of the Wisconsin State 
Board of Pharmacy, has been elected 
president of the Wisconsin Chapter of 
the Federal Bar Association. He also 
currently holds membership on the 
Drug Law Committee of the American 
Bar Association, and last year was 
named a consultant to the President's 
Advisory Commission on Narcotic and 
Drug Abuse. 

22 



1950-1959 

C. F. Dean, m.ed. '50, of College- 
dale, Tennessee, received his degree 
of Doctor of Education in Physical 
Education from Georgia Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers, Nashville, Tennessee 
in June of 1964. 

Charles P. Kretzer, bpa '50, form- 
er Associate Professor of Economics at 
Monroe Community College, New York 
has joined the faculty of Norwich Uni- 
versity, Norfolk, Virginia, as an Assist- 
ant Professor in Economics and Busi- 
ness Administration. 

James Lefter, engr. '51, Chief, 
Structural Division, Office of the As- 
sistant Administrator for Construction, 
Veteran's Administration, Washington, 
D. C, is the recipient of a distinguished 
service award in conjunction with the 
Career Education Awards of the Na- 
tional Institute of Public Affairs. The 
award carries a Ford Foundation grant 
entitling the winner to a year of gradu- 
ate study at one of five universities. 
Lefter will attend Virginia State. 

George J. Laurer, engr. '51, of 
Endwell, New York, was recently pro- 
moted to Senior Engineer in the 
Industry and Customs Systems Depart- 
ment of IBM Inc., Development Labo- 
ratory, Endicott, New York. 

Raymond V. Sharp, mil. sci. '51 of 
Miami, Florida, has been promoted to 
major in the U. S. Air Force at Albrook 
AFB, Canal Zone. Major Sharp is a 
fuels officer in a unit that supports the 
Air Force's Southern Command (USA- 
FSO) mission of administering special 
training and military assistance to 
Latin American countries. 

Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin 
K. Blackburn, ll.b. '51, of Baltimore, 
Maryland, tied for second place honors 
in a class of 334 USAR and Army Na- 
tional Guard officers graduating from 
the U. S. Army Command and General 
Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, 
Kansas. 

Major Joseph J. Piala, ph.d. '51, 
of Metuchen, New Jersey, is quite busy 
these days. In addition to his service 
during the summer with the 20th Medi- 
cal Service Squadron, USAF Reserve, 
he devotes his civilian time to the E.R. 
Squibb Company of New Brunswick, 
New Jersey, where he is a member of 
the company's Institute of Research. 

Benjamin B. Halleck, engr. '51, 
has been named as Alcohol Unit Area 
Superintendent of the U. S. Industrial 
Chemicals Company of Tuscola, Illi- 
nois. Halleck had served as assistant 
area superintendent in the Ethylene 
Unit. 

Ray O. Roberts, mil. sci. '52, of 
Pooler, Georgia, recently promoted to 
colonel in the U. S. Air Force, has as- 
sumed the position of supervisor for 




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the Maryland Magazine 



testing of the F-lll(TFX) weapons 
system at the General Dynamics office, 
Fort Worth, Texas. 

James L. Winter, a&s '52, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, has been appointed a 
district manager in the Consolidated 
Electrodynamics Corporation of Pasa- 
dena, California, a subsidiary of the 
Bell & Howell Corporation. 

Dr. John M. Dawson, a&s '52, 
ph.d. '57, has been appointed Associ- 
ate Head of the Plasma Physics Lab- 
oratory's Theoretical Division at Prince- 
ton's James Forrestal Research Center. 
The research physicist also teaches in 
the university's Department of Astro- 
physical Sciences. 

First Lieutenant Michael E. 
Board, educ. '52 of Baltimore, has 
been assigned as a C-130 pilot at Pope 
AFB, Texas upon completion of train- 
ing at the U. S. Air Force Southern 
Command Tropical Survival School in 
the Canal Zone. 

Charles Porter Ellington, m.s. 
'52, received a Ph.D. in Agronomy at 
the June Commencement ceremonies of 
Pennsylvania State University. 

William S. Ray, ph.d. '53, Profes- 
sor of Psychology at the University of 
North Carolina in Greensboro, is the 
author of The Science of Psychology: 
An Introduction, published June 1, 
1964 by Macmillan. Dr. Ray has previ- 
ously written An Introduction to Ex- 
perimental Design and Statistics in 
Psychological Research. 

Colonel Dante E. Bulli, mil. sci. 
'53 of Cherry, Illinois, who graduated 
in June from the Air War College at 
Maxwell AFB, Alabama, was re- 
assigned to McCoy AFB, Florida, as 
commander of the Strategic Air Com- 
mand's 267th Bomb Squadron. 

Captain, James P. Coyne, bpa '53, 
formerly of Chevy Chase, Maryland, 
was a member of the first class in the 
United States Air Force to check out in 
the F4 "Phantom Two", the Mach-2 jet 
which is the newest, fastest and high- 
est flying fighter-bomber in the Tac- 
tical Command's jet arsenal. 

Lieutenant Colonel Richard A. 
Naldrerr, mil. sci. '53, is now on 
duty with a United States Air Force 
advisory unit assisting the armed forces 
of Viet Nam in their fight against com- 
munist aggression. Colonel Naldrett, a 
special operations planning officer, will 
train and assist Vietnamese personnel in 
mastering various techniques necessary 
for maintenance of modern military. 

Colonel Robert A. Ackerly, mil. 
sci. '54, of Middletown, New York, 
USAF, deputy director of operations 
for the 20th Fighter Bomber Wing. 
Wethersfield, England, was presented 
with a Commendation Medal for his 
services, at the same time that his wing 
received the Outstanding Unit Award 
of the United States Air Force. 

Lieutenant Colonel Albert J. 
Kirsling, mil. sci. '54, is now as- 



signed to the Officers Assignment Dim 
sion at Headquarters. L. S An I our 
in Washington lor duty as chid Ol (he 
policy section. 

Lieutenant Colonei WooDROVt 

W. Jl NKINS, Mil . s< i 'M, M.S 

of Sperryville. Virginia, is presently as 

signed to the Directorate ol Accounting 

and Finance at Headquarters, is\i 
Washington, as an accounting systems 
officer. 

Lieutenant Colonei I wins I). 
Henderson, mil. sci. '54, oi Stanton. 
Michigan, graduated June 5 Iron) the 
Air War College at Alabama's Maxwell 
Air Force Base. He has been reassigned 
to Washington headquarters, as direc- 
tor of operational requirements. 

Lieutenant Colonel Robert H. 
James, mil. sci. '54, Homerville. Geor- 
gia, has arrived at Robins AFB, Geor- 
gia, to assume the position of director 
of data systems for Headquarters. Con- 
tinental Air Command. Previously he 
served at Kadena AB in Okinawa. 

Louie Miller Jr., mil. sci. '54, of 
McDade, Texas, promoted to colonel 
in the Air Force, is presently assigned 
to Headquarters, USAF Security Serv- 
ice, San Antonio, Texas, as director of 
officer personnel. 

Captain Donaldson D. Frizzel, 
agr. '54, of Ellicott City, Maryland, ar- 
rived for duty at Langley AFB, Vir- 
ginia with a Tactical Air Command 
unit. Captain Frizzell, a C-130B pilot, 
is assigned to the 773rd Troop Carrier 
Squadron. 

Vincent A. Roy, educ. '54, of 
Greensboro, Pennsylvania, has been 
named to a commercial sales position 
with the West Penn Power Company. 
Roy, previously serving as public rela- 



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tions representative at the general of- 
fice, was appointed commercial cus- 
tomer representative in the Loyalhanna 
district of Pennsylvania. 

Robert K. Bing, m.a. '54, ed.d. '61, 
former Director of Activity Therapies, 
Illinois State Psychiatric Institute in 
Chicago, has been appointed Assistant 
Professor of Occupational Therapy in 
the College of Medicine, the University 
of Illinois. 

William H. Shepard, educ. '55 be- 
came President of Walla Walla College, 
in College Place, Washington, this July. 

Cyril J. Reap, mil. sci. '55, of Dun- 
more, Pennsylvania, has been promoted 
to colonel in the U. S. Air Force. He is 
assigned as a maintenance control offi- 
cer for Headquarters, 63rd Troop Car- 
rier Wing at Hunter AFB, Georgia. 

Bennett Crain Jr., ll.b. '55, is in- 
cluded in the annual Jaycee publication, 
Outstanding Young Men of America. 
In 1963 he was named one of the five 
Outstanding Young Men in Maryland, 
and also was nominated by the Junior 
Bar Association of Baltimore for Out- 
standing Young Lawyer of the year. 
Mr. Crain presently serves as the at- 
torney for the Annapolis Urban Re- 
newal Authority. 

Marvin P. Bryant, ph.d. '55, pres- 
ently in charge of Rumen Metabolism 
and Microbiological Investigations, 
Dairy Cattle Research Branch, Agricul- 
tural Research Service, U. S. De- 
partment of Agriculture, Beltsville, 
Maryland, has been appointed Associate 
Professor of Bacteriology, in the De- 
partment of Dairy Science, the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

William E. Kindley, a&s '55, 
was named supervisor of group lines at 
the Travelers Insurance Companies of- 
fice in Haddonfield, Connecticut. 

Major Felix H. Jewell, u.c. '55, 
is director of Project BUSH, U. S. Air 
Force program which is a cooperative 
effort of American Companies and the 
armed services to transport American 
made products in Europe and North 
Africa. 

Lieutenant Colonel Gordon C. 
Preller, mil. sci. '55, of New Haven, 
Connecticut, was one of 15 senior Air 
Force officers who received diplomas at 
graduation ceremonies at the Army 
War College, Carlisle Barracks, Penn- 
sylvania, on June 15, 1964. 

Captain Edward A. Livingstone, 
(army reserve) a&s '55, of Bradbury 
Heights, Maryland, graduated from the 
Army Reserve Command and General 
Staff College Associate course, on July 
18, 1964, following two weeks of active 
duty training at Fort Leavenworth, 
Kansas. 

Laurence I. Ady, a&s '56, received 
his Master of Arts degree in Education 
at Rollins College, Winter Park, Flor- 
ida on May 31, 1964. 

Ann Musette Beers, educ. '56, of 
Annapolis, Maryland, received a Master 



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the Maryland Magazine 



of Arts degree from Marshall Univer- 
sity in Huntington, West Virginia. 

Lieutenant Colonel Evarice C. 
Mire, Jr., m.a. '56, of Montgomery, 
Alabama, has been selected to enter the 
U. S. Army War College at Carlisle 
Barracks, Pennsylvania. He is one of 
205 senior military officers to undergo 
ten months of intensive academic train- 
ing in preparation for command and 
staff positions. 

Colonel Reginald T. Weber, (AUS 
Ret.) mba '56, of Montgomery Ala- 
bama, Associate Professor of Business 
Administration at Norwich University, 
received his Ph.D. at commencement 
exercises held at New York University 
on June 10, 1964. 

William A. Klein, ph.d. '56, has 
been promoted to manager of chemical 
research and development in the abra- 
sives laboratory at 3M Company in St. 
Paul, Minnesota. 

Jean B. Waters, ph.d. '57, of Lan- 
caster, Pennsylvania, has been pro- 
moted to Senior Professional Service 
Representative in Smith Kline and 
French Laboratories, centered in Phil- 
adelphia. 

Dr. Stanley M. Holberg, ph.d. '58, 
of St. Lawrence University, Canton, 
New York, has recently been promoted 
to Associate Professor of English at the 
University. 

Mrs. Nancy Lee Ady, educ. '58, re- 
ceived her master's degree in Educa- 
tion this spring during commencement 
exercises at Rollins College, Winter 
Park, Florida. 

Col. Carl W. Bradford, mil. sci. 
'58, has been decorated with the United 
States Air Force Commendation Medal 
at Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. The medal 
was awarded for meritorious service as 
Armed Forces Day project officer for 
the New England states, New York and 
New Jersey, while assigned to McGuire 
AFB, New Jersey. 

Michael B. Miraglia, mil. sci. '58, 
of Geneva, Illinois, has been promoted 
to major in the U. S. Air Force at 
Wheeler AFB, Hawaii, where he is as- 
signed as chief of the operations and 
maintenance division. 

Lieutenant Colonel George O. 
Anderson, mil. sci. '58, of Cranford, 
New Jersey, has completed the combat 
operations course at the Air Force Air- 
Ground Operations School at Hurlburt 
AFB, Florida. He is an Air Force rep- 
resentative at Fort Knox, Kentucky. 

Lieutenant Colonel Fred W. 
Schultz, mil sci. '58, (USAF Ret.) 
who was instrumental in the develop- 
ment of the AUTODIN communica- 
tions network of the U. S. Department 
of Defense, has been named Program 
Manager of Systems Implementation 
for Western Union in Washington, 
D. C. 

Captain Thomas P. Williams, 
mil. sci. '58, of Waynesboro, Ohio, a 
member of the USAF Tactical Com- 

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mand, is currently studying cold 
weather combat problems with Exercise 
Polar Seige now underway in Alaska. 
He will return to Dyess AFB, Texas for 
permanent duty when the training 
maneuver is completed in February. 

Lieutenant Colonel Arthur M. 
Burton, mil. sci. '58, of Tipton, Indi- 
ana, retired from active duty in the 
Air Force, to accept the position of as- 
sistant to the president of Gonzaga 
University, Spokane, Washington. He 
had previously been assigned to the 
AFROTC program at the University of 
Kentucky as an Assistant Professor. 

Victor J. Pepe, bpa '58, of College 
Park Estates, has been named Distin- 
guished Salesman of the Year by The 
Reuben Donnelley Telephone Directory 
Corporation, Washington, D. C. 

Lieutenant Colonel George W. 
Shipley, mil. sci. '58, formerly of 
Washington, D. C, arrived for duty at 
Headquarters, Pacific Air Forces at 
Hickam AFB, Hawaii, where his unit 
will provide airpower for defense of 
the U. S. and its allies in the Pacific 
area. 

Captain Richard H. Morgan, p.e. 
'59, of Arlington, Virginia, was named 
a distinguished graduate in his class of 
more than 800 U. S. Air Force officers 
at the Squadron Officer School, Max- 
well AFB, Alabama. 

Master Sergeant Ralph W. Bates, 
cscs '59, has completed the special 
Air Force Recruiter course at Lackland 
AFB, Texas, which will entitle him for 
service as a recruiter at Omaha, Ne- 
braska. 

Major Allan W. Huett, cscs '59, 
of Chicago, Illinois, was named a dis- 
tinguished graduate of the Air Univer- 
sity's academic instructor course at 
Maxwell AFB, Alabama where he will 
serve in the warfare systems school. 

Donald David Long, bpa '59, has 
joined the field property claim staff 
of the State Farm Mutual Automobile 
Insurance Company in its Towson, 
Maryland branch. 

Dr. Si Duk Lee, m.s. '59, ph.d. '62, 
(agr) has been appointed to the staff 
of the U. S. Public Health Service's 
Robert A. Taft Sanitary Center, located 
in Cincinnati, Ohio. Dr. Lee is serving 
presently as a research chemist in the 
Physiology Section of the services Air 
Pollution Laboratory of Medical and 
Biological Sciences. 

Thomas D. Hanlon, bpa '59, was 
appointed assistant manager of the Las 
Vegas, Nevada Convention Bureau 
where he will be engaged primarily in 
public relations and sales promotion 
activities. 

Robert W. Bower, u.c. '59, of 
Washington, D. C, received his MBA 
degree from American University in 
lune of 1964. He is presently employed 
in marketing in the field of Electronic 
Data Processing at the RCA corpora- 
tion. 



THE SIXTIES 

Captain Charles W. Fowler, a&s 
'59, u.c. '60, of Lusby, Maryland, ar- 
rived for duty with Headquarters, Sev- 
enteenth Air Force at Ramstein AFB, 
Germany. 

Bruce A. Brough, educ. '59, bpa 
'60, has been named public relations 
field representative in the Ford Motor 
Company's Washington office. Mr. 
Brough previously was editor of God- 
dard News, official publication of the 
National Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration's Goddard Space Flight 
Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. 

First Lieutenant Ralph P. Ham- 
ilton, p.e. '60, of Waldorf, Maryland, 
has been awarded the U. S. Air Force 
Oustanding Unit Award at Langley 
AFB, Virginia. 

Iris Kern Shapiro, a&s '60, re- 
ceived the degree of Master of Arts at 
the June commencement exercises of 
the State University of Iowa. 

VlTHALBHAI LALLUBHAI PaTEL, A&S 

'60, received his Ph.D. in Physics at the 
June graduation of the University of 
New Hampshire. 

First Lieutenant Randolph A. 
Cramer, bpa '60, m.b.a. '63, of Woods- 
boro, Maryland, has completed his first 
solo flight in the T-33 jet trainer, while 
undergoing Air Force pilot training at 
Laughlin AFB, Texas. 

Richard C. Jacobs, bpa '60, vice 
president, Jet Spray International Cor- 
poration, Waltham, Massachusetts, was 
a featured speaker recently at the 47th 
National Conference of the American 
Marketing Association at the Sheraton 
Dallas Hotel, Dallas, Texas. His ad- 
dress directed at major manufacturing 
concerns, stressed the development of 
foreign markets. 

Lieutenant Colonel Daniel M. 
Herrin, u.c. '60, of Salisbury, North 
Carolina, has completed the Air Force's 
Air War College correspondence course 
in economics of national security. Colo- 
nel Herrin is the executive officer of the 
USAF hospital at Homestead AFB, 
Florida, the medical division of the 
Strategic Air Command. 

Colonel Frank L. Gailer, Jr., 
m.a. '60, of Great Neck, New York, has 
assumed the position of deputy com- 
mander of training at Laredo AFB, 
Texas. Prior to this appointment, he 
served as chief of the Latin American 
Missions Branch located in Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Lieutenant Colonel Gilbert D. 
Hereth, u.c. '60, of Bremerton, Wash- 
ington, a June graduate of the Air 
Force's Air War College for officers has 
been reassigned to the Tactical Air 
Command at Langley AFB, Virginia. 

First Lieutenant Richard J. 
Evers, engr. '60, of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, arrived for duty with a unit of the 
Pacific Air Forces at Don Muang AB, 
Thailand. 



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26 



the Maryland Magazine 



Lieutenant Colonel Robert S. 
Paukert, u.c. '60, of Cedar Rapids, 
Iowa, has graduated from the Air War 
College seminar program at Maxwell 
AFB, Alabama where he is director of 
the data processing center. 

Second Lieutenant Gerald M. Lu, 
engr. '61, is being reassigned to Francis 
E. Warren AFB, Wyoming, following 
his graduation from the Air Force In- 
stitute of Technology course in applied 
engineering at Wright-Patterson AFB, 
Ohio. 

Daniel C. King, engr. '61, of 
Damascus, Maryland, has been com- 
missioned a second lieutenant in the 
U. S. Air Force following graduation 
from Officer Training School at Lack- 
land AFB, Texas. 

Billy Milton Guice, bpa '61, 
was granted a Master of Arts Degree 
in Education at Furman University in 
Greenville, South Carolina. 

Linda Cooper Slan, educ. '61, re- 
ceived the degree of Master of Science 
in Speech and Hearing from Washing- 
ton University in St. Louis, Missouri 
during its 103rd commencement on 
June 8, 1964. 

Henry Norman Siebenberg, engr. 
'61 received his M.S. degree in Mechan- 
ical Engineering during the June 12 
Commencement Exercises held at the 
Hartford Graduate Center of Rensse- 
laer Polytechnic Institute of Troy, 
New York. 

John S. Delibera, a&s '61, was 
one of those persons receiving advanced 
degrees from Ohio State University, 
Columbus, Ohio in the spring com- 
mencement. Mr. Delibera earned a 
bachelor of laws degree in his gradu- 
ate work. 

Second Lieutenant Charles A. 
Grandmaison, Jr., p.e. '61, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, has been assigned to an 
Air Training Command unit at Mather 
AFB, California following his gradua- 
tion as a U. S. Air Force pilot. 

Lieutenant Colonel Warren D. 
Curton, u.c. '61 of Chattanooga, Ten- 
nessee, was graduated from the Air 
Force's Air War College at Maxwell 
AFB, Alabama. He is now assigned to 
Lakenheath RAF Station, England for 
duty as commander of the 48th Tactical 
Fighter Wing. 

Captain John W. Dawson, u.c. 
'61, of Vincennes, Indiana, a tactical 
pilot with the United States Air Force, 
is now serving at Cannon AFB, New 
Mexico. 

Dr. Ray E. Hiebert, m.a. '61, ph.d. 
'62, Chairman of the Department of 
Journalism and Public Relations at The 
American University, along with his 
graduate assistant, will share a grant 
from the Public Relations Society of 
America for a study entitled "Public 
Relations Education in American Col- 
leges and Universities." 

Jackson Delaney Pennington, 
a&s '61, ll.b. '63, of Charlottesville, 

July-October, 1964 



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Virginia, has joined the field claim staff 
of the Baltimore office of The State 
Farm Mutual Automobile Insurance 
Company. 

Douglas W. Davis, u.c. '61, m.a. 
'64, retired from active service in the 
U. S. Navy, to begin work on his Ph.D. 
at Maryland University where he is 
studying Government and Politics. 
Early in April, Davis became a member 
of Pi Sigma Alpha, the National Politi- 
cal Science honor society. 

Lieutenant Colonel Stephen E. 
Akers, u.c. '62, of Longmont, Color- 
ado, has been assigned to the Office 
of the Surgeon of Headquarters, U. S. 
Army, Fort Shafter, Hawaii. 

Penelope Jo Parker, h.ec. '62, a 
major in textiles and clothing, has been 
selected for the position of manage- 
ment technician in the Office of the 
Secretary, the Department of Health, 
Education and Welfare, located in Phil- 
adelphia. 

Second Lieutenant Bruce J. Gold, 
educ. '62, of Yonkers, New York, has 
been awarded the silver wings of a 
United States Air Force pilot upon 
graduation from flying training at 
Moody AFB, Georgia. 

Technical Sergeant Freddie J. 
Walton, u.c. '62, of Huntsville, Ala- 
bama, has been named the Outstanding 
Noncommissioned Officer for the past 
six months in the 820th Strategic Aero- 
space Division at Plattsburgh AFB, 
New York. 

Lieutenant Colonel Jack A. 
Dunlap, u.c. '62, U. S. Army, received 
the Legion of Merit on May 8 of this 
year, while assigned to the Department 
of Joint, Combined and Special Opera- 
tions at the U. S. Army Command and 
General Staff College, Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kansas. 

Theodore M. Allen, engr. '62, of 
St. Michaels, Maryland, has been pro- 
moted to first lieutenant in the U. S. 
Air Force at Little Rock AFB, Arkan- 
sas, where he is a design engineer for 
the Strategic Air Command. 

Barry David Berger, a&s '62, re- 
ceived his master's degree in Psychol- 
ogy from Bryn Mawr College, Radnor, 
Pennsylvania, during its spring com- 
mencement. 

Irene E. Suizu, bpa '62, of Wash- 
ington, D. C, is presently employed as 
an economist for the U. S. Department 
of Commerce. 

Thomas J. Howser, engr. '62, for- 
merly of Mt. Rainier, Maryland, who 
accepted employment with the Depart- 
ment of Highways, State of Califor- 
nia, in Los Angeles, has recently passed 
the qualifying examination as an assist- 
ant engineer with that department. 

Airman Third Class Paul W. 
Quinn, bpa '62 of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, has been named an honor gradu- 
ate of the United States Air Force 
course for inventory specialists at 
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28 



the Maryland Magazine 



Major Clair R. Call, u.c. '62, of 
Oakland City, Indiana, has arrived for 
duty with the Air Force section of U.S. 
Military Assistance Advisory Group in 
Saigon, Viet Nam. 

Morton P. Lubin, a&s '62, of 
Baltimore, Maryland, has been pro- 
moted to first lieutenant in the U.S. 
Air Force. He is an administrative 
services officer in the 3790th School 
Squadron at Gunter AFB, Alabama. 

Master Slrgeant Karl R. Dober- 
einer, u.c. '62, of Argyle, New York, 
has completed the U.S. Air Force 
course for technical instructors at Shep- 
pard AFB, Texas. The sergeant, an 
aircraft electrician, is being reassigned 
to Dover AB, Delaware, for instructor 
duty. 

Hugh P. Burns, bpa '62, of Green- 
belt, Maryland, has been promoted to 
first lieutenant in the Air Force. Lieu- 
tenant Burns, an information staff of- 
ficer, is assigned to the 351st Strategic 
Missile Wing at Whiteman AFB, Mis- 
souri. 

Nolan Russell Wallach, a&s '62, 
received his Master of Arts degree in 
Mathematics this June for academic 
work completed in January at Wash- 
ington University, St. Louis, Missouri. 
Eric Bun Chiong Khu, ph.d. '63, 
has traveled extensively in the Far 
East, and is now living near Sydney, 
Australia. 

Technical Sergeant Robert O. 
Frier Jr.. u.c. '63, of Dover, Dela- 
ware, has arrived for duty at Ramstein 
AB, Germany with a unit of the U.S. 
Air Force. 

Lieutenant Colonel Robert L. 
Bobbett, u.c. '63, of St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, has also been assigned duty with 
the Air Force unit stationed at Ram- 
stein AFB, Germany. 

Captain Harold F. Johnson, 
u.c. '63, of Sodus, New York, is now 
with an Air Force hospital at Osan AB, 
Korea. He has previously been sta- 
tioned at Lackland AFB, Texas. 

Marie Elizabeth Hallion, a&s 
'63, is the recipient of the newly-estab- 
lished Mary Elizabeth Roby Scholar- 
ship offered by the University Park 
Republican Women's Club. The award 
is given annually to an upperclass or 
graduate woman student majoring in 
political science. 

Dr. Stephen S. Hirsch, ph.d. '63, 
has joined Chemstrand Research Cen- 
ter, Incorporated, as a research chem- 
ist. He is a member of the American 
Chemical Society. 

Arthur S. Morris, m.a. '63, an 
Englishman and graduate of Oxford 
University, was recently named In- 
structor in the Geography Department 
of Western Michigan University. 

J. P. Wilson, engr. '63, was one 
of two engineers with Weinschel En- 
gineering Company, Gaithersburg, 
Maryland, to present a technical paper 



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before the annual conference of the In- 
strument Society of America in October 
of 1964, in New York city. The paper, 
entitled "The Calibration of RF Signal 
Generators" dealt with the character- 
istics of the instrument and its applica- 
tions. 

Second Lieutenant John K. 
Gulck, educ. '63, of Baltimore, Mary- 
land, was reassigned to Cannon AFB, 
New Mexico, following his graduation 
from the course for Air Force weapons 
controllers at Tyndall AFB, Florida. 
The course placed special emphasis on 
radarscope and manual air defense 
system operation. 

Airman Third Class James E. 
Fowler, bpa '63, College Park, Mary- 
land, returned to his Air National 
Guard unit in Washington, D.C. follow- 
ing graduation from the technical train- 
ing course for Air Force electrical 
power plant specialists at Sheppard 
AFB, Texas. 

Airman Third Class Min Huey 
Der, bpa '63, of Baltimore, Maryland, 
has graduated from the technical train- 
ing course for Air Force medical serv- 
ice specialists, and is now stationed with 
a medical unit of the Maryland Air Na- 
tional Guard at Baltimore. 

Charles C. Heaton III, bpa '63, 
joined the Washington Star's Classi- 
fied Advertising Sales Staff. Mr. 
Heaton resides in Bethesda, Maryland. 

Second Lieutenant John D. 
Lohnas Jr., a&s '63, of LaVale, Mary- 
land, who graduated from the technical 
training course for Air Force commun- 
ications officers at Keesler AFB, Mis- 
sissippi, has been assigned to a Tactical 
Air Command unit at Eglin AFB, 
Florida. 

Dan W. Weller, Jr., engr. '63, of 
Hagerstown, Maryland, has recently 
graduated from the California Institute 
of Technology in Pasadena, with a 
Master of Science degree in Electrical 
Engineering. 

Lieutenant Colonel James T. 
Minyard, u.c. '63, of Lawrence, Indi- 
ana, graduated from the associate 
course at the U.S. Army Command and 
General Staff College in Fort Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, and is now assigned to 
the 38th Replacement Battalion's 176th 
Company in Korea. 

Second Lieutenant John B. 
O'Brien III, bpa '63, of Silver Spring, 
Maryland, is now undergoing pilot 
training at Reese AFB, Texas. 

Ernest P. Orr, a&s '63, of Fair- 
view, New Jersey, commissioned as a 
second lieutenant in the Air Force 
upon graduation from Officer Training 
School at Lackland AFB, Texas, has 
been reassigned to Sheppard AFB for 
further training as a missile launch 
officer. 

Philip A. Lauro, a&s '63, of 
Fairview, New Jersey, a newly-com- 
missioned second lieutenant in the U.S. 
Air Force, is now stationed at Keesler 



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30 



the Maryland Magazine 



AFB, Mississippi for training as a 
weapons controller. 

Second Lieutenant James F. 
Plantholt, a&s '63, of Beltsville, 
Maryland, is now serving with a Tac- 
tical Air Command unit at Eglin AFB 
in Florida, after his completion of an 
Air Force communications officers 
course at Keesler AFB. 

Edward D. Giahooly, engr. '63, 
is now assigned to the Physics Division 
of the United States Patent Office, 
Washington, D.C. 

Kenneth Dawsey, bpa '64, is now 
employed by the U.S. Naval Ocean- 
ographic Office branch in Suitland, 
Maryland. 

James Beattie, engr. '63, former 
president of the Student Government 
Association of Maryland is the recipi- 
ent of a National Area Fellowship to 
the Harvard University Graduate 
School of Business Administration. 

John W. Hummel, agr. '64, won a 
first place national award when he 
presented a research paper before the 
annual meeting of the American So- 
ciety of Agricultural Engineers. His 
work concerned the effect of fuel 
charge temperature on the performance 
of the LP gas engine. 

Lieutenant Colonel Gabriel P. 
Bartholomew, u.c. '64, of Los 
Angeles, California, is an Air Force ad- 
visor to the Niagara Falls Municipal 
Airport in New York. 

Melita Link, a&s '64, left for 
French-speaking West Africa on Sep- 
tember 27, 1964 as an English teacher 
with the Peace Corps. The new volun- 
teer took part in an intensive three 
months' training at Oberlin College, 
Ohio before her final acceptance. 

Steven J. Butler, bpa '64, has 
been appointed an agent at the Virginia 
Beach office of the REA Express, the 
nationwide and worldwide transporta- 
tion company with headquarters in 
New York. 

Diane Katherine Statz, a&s '64, 
of Kent Island, Maryland, is now em- 
ployed by the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture, Agricultural Research Serv- 
ice, as a chemist. 

Hamilton G. Walker, engr. '64, 
has recently joined Rohm & Haas Com- 
pany, the Philadelphia plastics and 
chemicals manufacturer, in the firm's 
research laboratories at Bridesburg, 
Pennsylvania. 

Charles N. Somers, ph.d. '64, who 
has been assistant director of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland's Baltimore Divi- 
sion of University College for three 
years, has accepted an appointment to 
the position of Assistant Academic 
Dean at Lock Haven State College in 
Pennsylvania. 

Virginia (Martini) Bigelow, 
educ. '64, of Passaic, New Jersey, has 
joined the staff of Senator Clifford 
P. Case (R-N.J.) as his receptionist. 



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3] 



In Memoriam 



Dr. William S. Seymour, Pharm. 
'92, m.d. '95, a general practitioner in 
Talbot County, Maryland for 66 years, 
died June 28, 1964 at his home after an 
illness of nine months. He was a mem- 
ber of the County Medical Society, and 
the Medical and Chirurgical Society of 
Maryland. 

Grenville Lewis, MAC '97, died 
on September 27, at Fort Howard 
Veterans Hospital. He was 88. 

Mr. Lewis was one of the first foot- 
ball greats at the University of Mary- 
land. He served as captain, coach and 
fullback of the 1896 team. There were 
many who thought that even in recent 
years he could have given a good ac- 
count of himself on the gridiron. As an 
active alumnus, Mr. Lewis returned to 
campus for many Homecoming celebra- 
tions and delighted in accompanying the 
newly-crowned Homecoming Queen for 
her ride around the stadium in an open 
convertible. 

A native of Washington, Mr. Lewis 
graduated from the University of Mary- 
land in 1897. He played professional 
football for several years before begin- 
ning work in railroad and mine con- 
struction in West Virginia. During 
World War I, he served as captain in 
the Army Corps of Engineers. After 
the war, he became assistant general 
superintendent of the Aliquippa, Pa. 
plant of Jones & Laughlin, Inc., and 
later was in charge of a CCC camp in 
western Maryland during the depres- 
sion. 

During World War II, Mr. Lewis was 
a building superintendent with contrac- 
tors responsible for building housing 
units at the Indian Head Arsenal. From 
1945 to 1959, when he retired, he was 
a supervisor in industrial relations at the 
Patuxent Naval Air Station. 

Mr. Lewis leaves his wife, Ruth, of 
Hollywood, Maryland; a son, Grenville 
III, of Dallas; a daughter, Mrs. Mary 
Lewis Reed, of Los Angeles; seven 
grandchildren; and a host of friends 
who span several generations. 

Jacob S. New, ll.b. '05, a Baltimore 
attorney and past Grand Master of Ma- 
sons in Maryland, died April 4, 1964. 
He had served as a member of the 
Legal Advisory Board during World 
War I, and professionally as a past vice 
president of the city and state Bar As- 
sociations and a member of the As- 
sociation of Life Insurance Counsel. 

Dr. William Michel, m.d. '12, a 
Baltimore physician, died on June 22, 
1964 at his home. He was a member 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Facul- 
ty, the Baltimore Medical Society, and 
the American Medical Society. 

Dr. Frederick J. Kimzey, m.d. '12, 
retired Baltimore pediatrician, died at 
his home, June 22, 1964. A former 



staff member of the Hospital for the 
Women of Maryland, he also was a 
consultant at the Presbyterian Church 
Home and Hospital and at Union Me- 
morial Hospital. He was a member 
of the Medical and Chirurgical Society, 
the Baltimore Medical Society, and the 
American Medical Society. 

Elbert C. Carpenter, d.d.s. '13, of 
Irvington, New Jersey, died on May 13, 
1964. 

Harry S. Dearstyne, agr. '13, of 
Norfolk, Virginia, died at his home on 
June 22, 1964. 

Dr. John J. Pivec, pharm. '15, a 
retired pharmacist who had practiced 
in Highlandtown, Maryland for many 
years, died on June 12, 1964 after a 
long illness. 

Dr. J. Fred Emerson, d.d.s. '17, a 
retired dentist of the Baltimore area, 
died suddenly while vacationing in Paris 
during May of 1964. Dr. Emerson, who 
was born in San Paulo, Brazil, was an 
instructor at the Dental School of the 
University until 1960. A known stamp 
enthusiast, he was an authority on the 
"Bull's Eye" and Don Pedro stamp 
issues of his native county. 

Dr. Morris N. Putterman, m.d. 
'18, general practitioner in Baltimore 
for 34 years, died August 11, 1964 at 
his home. He was a former member of 
the Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of 
Maryland, the Baltimore City Medical 
Society, and the American Medical As- 
sociation. 

Dr. Louis Lass, m.d. '21, of Altoona, 
Pennsylvania, who served on the staff 
of the Altoona Hospital for more than 
forty years, died at his home early in 
1964. 

Richard D. Biggs, ll.b., '24, resi- 
dent of Baltimore, and general counsel 
for the Loyola Federal Savings and 
Loan Association, died at his home 
June 8, 1964 after a long illness. 

Dr. Creed C. Greer, m.d. '28, of 
Clarksburg, West Virginia, died on July 
16, 1964 after a long illness. 

Joseph W. Wellington, m.a. '29, 
retired Department of Agriculture hor- 
ticulturist, died on June 13, 1964 
in Washington following complications 
in surgery. Mr. Wellington, who for- 
merly wrote gardening articles for the 
Evening Star papers, served as an agri- 
cultural research coordinator for the 
government, for which he received his 
department's Superior Service Award 
in 1951. 

Dr. Rollin C. Hudson, m.d. '30, 
past president of the Baltimore County 
Medical Association, died May 29, 
1964 after a lengthy illness. A specialist 
in dermatology. Dr. Hudson had a keen 
interest in semi-precious stones and 
fossils, of which he had an extensive 
collection. 




Abram Z. Gottwals, AGR. '38, 
died July 10 after suffering a stroke 
while addressing a service club in Salis- 
bury. 

Abe was taken while doing the thing 
he enjoyed most, helping others. Next 
to his professional career in banking, 
was his interest in the University 
Alumni Association. 

At the time of his death, he was 
Assistant Vice President of the First 
National Bank of Maryland, in charge 
of its Agricultural Department and sta- 
tioned in Salisbury. 

Following graduation, he taught 
vocational agriculture, served as secre- 
tary-treasurer of the Southern Maryland 
National Farm Loan Association, be- 
came the agricultural and public rela- 
tions representative of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Southern Maryland and 
in 1962 moved to First National Bank 
of Maryland. 

Abe was never too busy to help 
others. His list of friends and organiza- 
tions were endless and included: Mem- 
ber of the Alumni Council, University 
of Maryland; President of the board of 
Alpha Gamma Rho Alumni Associa- 
tion; past officer of Lions Club; director 
of the Delmarva Poultry Industry; 
Maryland 4-H Club Foundation; direc- 
tor, Wicomico County Red Cross; direc- 
tor, Maryland Tobacco Improvement 
Association; holder of the 4-H Alumni 
Award; and a director of the Chesa- 
peake Seafood Association. 

He was survived by his wife Mary 
Alice; two sons, both Maryland gradu- 
ates, Harry and George; and five sisters 
and three brothers. 

Richard. J. O'Brien, engr. '48, 
staff engineer for the Washington met- 
ropolitan area of the Chesapeake and 
Potomac Telephone Company, died of 
a heart attack in Washington's Casual- 
ty Hospital on July 20, 1964. 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 




Picture of a satellite in orbit-as drawn by a computer 



The domino-shaped box in the 
drawing above represents a com- 
munications satellite orbiting the 
earth. 

The various angles and positions 
of the box show the relative posi- 
tions of the satellite during one orbit. 

The drawing was made, not by a 
man, but by a computer at Bell Tele- 
phone Laboratories to help scientists 
visualize how the satellite would 
behave. 

What the computer did is called 
simulation. Working from data given 
it, the computer calculated, or 
simulated, the satellite's position at 
various instants and produced the 



picture on microfilm. The picture 
told us what we needed to know. 

We use such simulation a great 
deal to save time and hold down 
costs in developing and testing new 
products and services. 

Computers help us plan coast-to- 
coast transmission systems, new 
switching logic, and data systems. 
They also help us study problems 
relating to telephone usage at given 
times of the day or year. 

Not all of our simulation is done 
on computers. Often we can simu- 
late by other means. 

We test new kinds of undersea 
telephone cables in buried, brine- 



filled sleel pipes that duplicate the 
pressures and temperatures "l the 
ocean's bottom at various depths. 

Ingenious equipment in one ol 
our laboratories sends test telephone 
pulses racing around an electronic 
ring that simulates a l>0(H)-mile cir- 
cuit containing 5300 repeaters to 
boost voice volume. 

Many additional examples of simu- 
lation could be cited. Often the} help 
us spend our time and mone) more 
efficiently in developing new services 
and improving present ones— in mak- 
ing sure that America continues to 
enjoy the world's finest telephone 
service at the fairest possible prices. 



fjftj Bell Telephone System 



Serving you 



yylcUormick s ^famea 

^/r lcm 'skip Uourt - - - 

Of Jjaltimore J^anamark 




WORLD'S 
LEADING 

Spice and Extract 
House 




MARYLAND HOSPITALITY 

When playing hosts to guests from out of town, Baltimoreans are now 
frequently including a visit to McCormick's Friendship Court in their tour 
of picturesque and historic sites. Few places afford a more sweeping view 
of the Baltimore harhor as it stretches toward storied Fort McHenry. 

McCormick & Company's hostesses, all well versed in the historical 
and romantic lore of the spice and tea trade, are ever ready in Friendship 
Court to assist you in providing a friendly welcome to Baltimore. Also 
as part of McCormick hospitality, a refreshing cup of tea or coffee awaits 
guests in Ye Olde Tea House. 



McCORMICK & CO., INC.— "Jlie House of Flavor" 



\jgl i ▼^»«'»-^ 



Colkee Park. Md. 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



magazi ne 




the 




iiiiiK- i^-ii i<- 



Alumni Publication of the University of M.n 
Volume XXXVI November-December Number 5 



JVT;irvl<iocl 




The Cover: This photograph shows the Baltimore campus ai the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and its location close to the center of the City. The steel 
framework of the new Law School Building may be seen in the cleared 

area just left of the Hospital tower. Photograph by AI Danegger. 



2* Students Aid Mentally III 

^f Engineering Alumni at Hickory Hill 

O Maryland Girls 

1 \J What's New at the University? 

1 L Oyster Bowl Pep Rally 

1 T" Inside Maryland Sports 

X Alumni and Campus Notes 

Y y Through the Years 



BOARD OF REG ENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

RICHARD W. CASE, Assistant Treasurer 

DR. W'LLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

WILLIAM C. WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 

DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
J. B. ZATMAN, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

MRS^ERNA R. CHAPMAN, '34, President 

THE HONORABLE JOSEPH L. CARTER, '25, Vice-President 

MYLO S. DOWNEY, '27, Vice President 

COL. J. LOGAN SCHUTZ, '38, '40, Secretary-Treasurer 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 

OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
COL. J. LOGAN SCHUTZ, Director 



OFFICE OF FI NANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
JUDY SANDERS, Assistant Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 
THOMAS ORPWOOD, News Editor 

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

ROBERTSON LEACH 
826 W. 40th Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21211 
Telephone: Belmont 5-8302 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park. Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. $3.00 per year Fifty cents the copy Member of American Alumni Council. 




University of Maryland psychology students Mark King (left) 
and Charles C'itrenbaum (right) discuss a case history with 
Dr. Louis Arbona, division chief at Spring Grove State Hospi- 



tal. The two are among some 300 University students who 
have volunteered to spend a few hours each week helping 
patients in nearby centers for mentally disturbed. 



the Maryland Magazine 






Maryland Students 
Aid the Mentally 111 



by Isolde Weinberg 



STUDENTS FROM A CLASS IN ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY 
at the University of Maryland who visited a menial 
hospital as part of their course work last year were dis- 
tressed by the high proportion of patients to staff and the 
resulting impersonality of the treatment. 

Last fall their distress was translated into action. 

Three hundred students were recruited as Volunteers 
for Mental Health, agreeing to spend a few hours every 
week in one of five nearby centers for the emotionally ill 
or mentally retarded, contributing in any way they could 
to the residents' well-being. 

"I learned about the program while I was at the Univer- 
sity signing up for a course," said Martha Jackowski, Exec- 
utive Director of the Montgomery County Mental Health 
Association (UGF), a voluntary non-profit organization 
which works for better public understanding of mental 
health and for better treatment of the emotionally 
disturbed. 

"Students were lining up to register for the volunteer 
program as if they were giving away football tickets," she 
said. 

"Now that some traditional sources of volunteers arc 
drying up, as many women go on to jobs once their 
children are in school, the students' efforts are particularly 
important," she added. "The problem has been transpor- 
tation. More students are willing to work than there are 
cars available. We are hoping to find drivers from the 
community so all this willingness won't be lost." 

Mark King, student chairman of the volunteer group 
and a senior majoring in psychology, said, "Sometimes 
four or five of us would be ready to go to our assigned 
hospital, and then the driver couldn't make it, so we were 
all stuck." 

Last year, student volunteers worked at the Children's 
Center in Laurel; the Edgemeade Youth Center in Upper 
Marlboro; Spring Grove State Hospital, Catonsville; 
Springfield State Hospital, Sykesville, and St. Elizabeths 
Hospital. 

All the institutions have expressed hope that students 
will be available again this year. 

"The volunteer program worked out best when the 
student felt he or she was involved in a project with definite 
goals contributing to a patient's recovery — not just keeping 
him busy," said Dr. Stanley Pavey, assistant professor of 
psychology and the group's faculty advisor. 

"Sometimes a volunteer program can set off a chain 
reaction," Dr. Pavey continued. 

"Volunteers ask for a situation in which they can feel 
motivated. This in turn may call for a new effort from the 
hospital staff and can be stimulating right down the line 
to the aides in the wards who begin to see the patients in 
a different light." 

At Spring Grove State Hospital, students worked on 
one of the most regressed women's wards as part of a 
total attempt to help the patients. 

"In the beginning a doctor went around with us, explain- 
ing things," said Mark King. "We had to get used to it 

November-December, 1964 



and the women had to gel used to us coming in, instead <>f 
running away like a Hock ol sheep \iKi a while, the 
change was amazing. It gol so they were glad to 
They would gel dressed and put on lipstick. We took them 
on walks. They could talk to us in a different way because 
we didn't represent hospital authority." 

Nancy Rains. Executive-Secretarj oi Volunteei 
Mental Health and a psychology major at the University, 
also worked on the ward. "We felt the doctor respected 
us and our limited knowledge, that he cared about us and 
about the ward, and that he thought we could help." she- 
said. 

"For me, it was reality, not Ben Casey on television. 
You can read about 'catatonics' and 'schizophrenics' in 
books, but there is such a disparity between the hooks 
and the people. In the hospital you are thrown on your 
own resources. It is the test of your devotion and you can 
really find out if you want to go on working in this held." 

Dr. Pavey seconded Nancy's observations. "Psychology 
classes tend to categorize," he said. "'People don't lit neatly 
into the descriptions. Then, too, the students have a 
chance to get over the hump of seeing the people as 
'crazy' and to realize, emotionally as well as intellectually, 
that they are just human beings with difficulties." 

This year, students will also serve as volunteers at " I he 
Open Door," a social and recreational center in Silver 
Spring which is sponsored by the Montgomery County 
Mental Health Association for former patients. 

Persons volunteering to transport the students are 
welcome to join the program further by working with 
patients during the several hours between the trip to a 
hospital and the return to the University. 

"It was a mistake in the first place to exile mental 
patients in outlying institutions," said Dr. Pavey. 

"But until we develop community-based mental health 
centers, we can go some distance toward remedying the 
error by having people who represent the community going 
out to the hospitals and taking an interest in the people." 



Alumni Can Help 

WHERE: Volunteers for Mental Health, special project 
at the University of Maryland, in association with 
the Montgomery County and Prince deorges 
County Mental Health Association ( United Givers 
Fund agencies). 

WHO IS NEEDED: People to drive small groups o! 
student volunteers to hospitals and centers lor the 
emotionally ill and mentally retarded. Drners maj 
participate in hospital programs it thej wish. 

HOW MUCH TIME: Three to lour hours (including 
driving time) once a week, afternoons, evenings or 
weekends. 

CALL: Dr. Stanley Pavey, WA 7-3800, ext. 7M4. 



PRINTED BY PERMISSION OF THE WASHINGTON POS1 

\\n i i \ 1 1 ■- i i ■ 



ENGINEERING ALUMNI MEET 



_ 





AT 

HICKORY HILL 



THE FIFTH ANNUAL BULL ROAST OF THE ENGINEERING 
Alumni of the University of Maryland was held at 
Hickory Hill Farm, the home of Ben Dyer, '31. The stag 
affair on October 10 was attended by approximately 200 
graduate engineers and their guests. 

Joe Deckman was in charge of the food, which was the 
main order of business for the day, and he and Chester 
"Shorty" Ward personally handled the carving to see that 
everyone received a generous portion from the huge rounds 
of beef. Francis White was in charge of "sports events" 
which featured such strenuous activities as tossing a soft 
ball into a milk can and long distance ping-pong ball 
throwing. Anything to ward off the chilling wind! Prizes 
were awarded to the various sports champions. Col. O. H. 
Saunders received a desk set for being the earliest graduate 
present from the College of Engineering. He graduated in 
1910. 

Prizes for the athletic events were awarded to the fol- 
lowing: Lou Tacchetti, Bill Mentzer, and Dick Kisielewski 
for the highest cumulative points in all contests; Denny 
Brown, Hole-in-one; Ken McAuliffe, Plate Toss; Bill 
Mentzer, Football Kick; Jeff Greenwell, Football Throw; 
Bud Holm, Softball Toss. 

A high point of the afternoon was the presentation by 
President Sy Wolf of a gift to Ben Dyer in appreciation 
for the use of the beautiful Dyer farm for the Annual Bull 
Roast. The gift was a lamp made from an antique survey- 
or's transit. Mr. Wolf then introduced the honored guests. 
Among these were F. T. Mavis, Dean of the College of 
Engineering; Russell Allen, Associate Dean; Dean Emeri- 
tus S. S. Steinberg; J. B. Zatman, Director of University 
Relations; J. Logan Schutz, Director of Alumni Affairs; 
retired professors Donald Hennick, L. J. Hodgins, Wilbert 
Huff. Also present were department heads Charles Looney 
(C.E.), C. A. Shreeve (M.E.), and student leaders 
William Proffit (IEE), William Sangrey (Pi Tau Sigma), 
Warren Shinker (ASCE) and Jim Snyder (Tau Beta Pi). 

Other alumni attending were Newell Anderson, Charles 
Armentrout, S. E. Asendorf, G. P. Baumgarten, Robert 
Baumgardner, J. Beckham, Robert Bissell, M. K. Blanch- 
ard, W. C. Booze, Ronald Britncr, Denny Brown, George 
Burke, Harold Burns, David Carpenter, Ray Chapman. 
John Coburn, Jr., W. H. Collins, Carlos Cordero, John 
Darling, Joseph H. Deckman, Walter Durigg, John Dye, 
Ben Dyer, Raymond Eckert, Norman Ely, John Emler, 



Joe Deckman, chef for a day. 







above: Alumni relax at Hickory Hill's pasture fence. Left to right: 
unidentified, Carroll L. Rowny and Ray Chapman, above, right: 
Francis White and Bud Holm prepare for the "Engineer's Octa- 
thon" — an athletic spectacular, right: registration, below: Presi- 
dent Sy Wolf introduces guests (from left) Joshua Zatman, Dean 
F. T. Mavis, Dean S. S. Steinberg, Col. J. Logan Schutz, Pro- 
fessor Wilbert Huff and Dr. Charles T. Looney. 



■MMNM 



■ ■ ■ ■■■ ■ ■■■ 

■ ■! i — — — w— — ■ 





Dean Steinberg, Dean Mavis, Sy 
Wolf and Col. O. H. Saunders. 







Hickory Hill continued 



Harold Evans, Bernard Eyler, N. E. Felt, Jr., Elmer 
Freemire, R. H. Funke, Jr., Daniel L. Garber, Jr., 
William Gifford, Bob Ginnings, Melvin Glaeser, Jay V. 
Hall, Jr., Richard Hardie, Mathews Haspert, Charles Hay- 
leck, Clifford Hilton, Bud Holm, William Hoover, Warner 
Hord, Jr., Kenneth Howard, John Hughes, Dock Jew, 
Charles Johnson, R. B. Jones, Harold Kelly, Jr., Harry E. 
Knight, John W. Knight, Frederick J. Kull, Paul Lanham, 
Alan Leaman, Emmett Loane, Hugh Lupien, Theodore 
A. Lupien, Jr., John Macomber, Robert Mallonee, Kenneth 
J. McAuliffe, Mike McCordic, George McGowan, W. R. 
Mentzer, Robert Morton, Ernest Mullinix, Benjamin 
Munroe, Thomas V. Murphy, Jr., Charles Nichols, George 
W. Norris, Jr., Vytautas Penkiunas, Fred Perkins, Bene- 
dict A. Pokrywka, Bill Reams, Ralph L. Rector, Dick 
Reed, Elmer H. Rehberger, Raymond F. Resta, Robert 
Rivello, Neil E. Roberts, Carroll L. Rowny, Seymour Ruff, 
Jeffrey Rumbaugh, Wesley Samosuk, M. Sampson, Gerard 
H. Schlimm, William L. Shook, Les Smith, Louis A. 
Spittel, Jr., John Stottlemyer, Bob Suchy, Ralph Tabler, 
Reeves Tilley, John E. Waldo, Chester S. Ward, Gordon 
Ward, P. A. Wedding, Charles Wenger, Russell L. 
Werneth, E. P. Williams, Milton H. Wills, Jr., Fred 
Witmer. 

Others include Bob Evans, Mel Gray, Frank Picha, 
Pat Lanigan, Sy Wolf, Bob Reed, Dick Kisielewski, 
George Weber, John Macris, John Cournyn, Lou Tac- 
chetti, Walt Aring, Francis White, Merrick Shawe, Gordon 
Robertson, Dave Murphy, Hank Marsh, Bob Blase, Eugene 
Roberts, Norris Hekimian, Louis Koschmeder, Ray 
Godman, Chuck Irish, John Mitton, Alvin Basford, Wesson 
Miller, Kiloh Knight, Andy Marriott, Bill Meyer, Jim 
Shook, J. W. Dulaney, Jim Clark, Gerald Fuller, John 
Rupp, W. P. Poole, Vance Browne, Bill Boyce, Alec 
Hedquist, Harry Burdick, Bob Ward, James Rand, Cliff 
Sayre, Roy Bowles, Arnold Korab, Dick Murdoch, Ed 
Shrewsbury, Fred Wallett, Bob King, Buz Hello, Ray 
Vass, John Buckley, Ward McElvany, Ed Howlin, Arthur 
Vossler, Bob Reese, Al Parulis and Bill Case. 



the Maryland Magazine 




Kay Dobronte, Freshman Queen 



IngridUldrikis, 1963 Homecoming Quel 



Maryland Girls 

IN CASE IT HAS SLIPPED YOUR MIND, MARYLAND GIRLS 
are something very special. They look special. There is 
a freshness and a vibrancy to them. And they give a worn 
and jaded world a brightness and an innocence. 

Each year the girls are prettier and smarter. Who said 
that beauty and brains are rarely combined? Almost with- 
out exception, girls selected by their fellow students as 
queens of one event or another rank in the top third of 
their class. 

The girls you remembered when you were a student are 
still here. This year, and every year, they appear with the 
same shining, expectant eyes, the same grace, the same 
youthful spirit. Remember? 




[Ruth Hatfield, Greek Week Queen 
Dot Wood, Sophomore Queen 





Janice Negler, Miss Maryland 



What's New at the University? 




Graduate students aligning a ring laser for studies of rotation sensing in Professor 
Carroll Alley's atomic physics quantum electronics group, department of physics. 



These aerial views indicate the large areas which have been established for the parking of automobiles at College Park. 
Parking spaces now approximate 9.000 and constitute the largest number of such spaces available at any American university. 





*&&& c j*J£, 



"# 9991 






m &&®m&#a S *. 



**n 







the Maryland Magazine 




These new dormitory buildings are situated between Byrd Stadium 
and the University Golf Course. Easton Hall is in the upper left, 
Denton Hall in the lower left, Elkton Hall (under construction) 
in the right and Dining Room Number Four is located in the center. 



Dr. Robert W. Krauss. Head of the Department of Botany, 
and Congressman Carl Elliott, Chairman of the House 
Committee of Government-Sponsored Research, discuss 
progress being made in the area of Microbial Physiology 
in the Plant Physiology Group at the University. 







November-December, 1964 




Coach Tom Nugent 



Oyster Bowl Pep Rally 



Maryland's invitation to play 
North Carolina in the Annual 
Oyster Bowl Game started the wheels 
turning for an Alumni Pep Rally held 
in Virginia Beach, Virginia, the night 
before the game. The occasion was 
not only a pep rally for the game, but 
also an organizational meeting for the 
formation of an alumni club in the 
Norfolk area. A hundred enthusiastic 
alumni and friends attended the affair 
held at the Bay Harbour Club in 
Virginia Beach. 

Tom Nugent, Head Football Coach 
of the University of Maryland, was 
the guest speaker of the evening. He 
presented and narrated a film of foot- 
ball highlights from Maryland's 1964 
schedule. President Wilson H. Elkins 
was on hand to welcome the group. 
Greetings also were offered by Mrs. 
Erna R. Chapman, President of the 
Alumni Association, and Col. J. 
Logan Schutz, Director of Alumni 
Affairs. 

After refreshments were served and 
Coach Nugent's presentation, a short 
business meeting was held to elect 
officers for the newly-formed club. 
Daniel Arris, BPA '57, was elected 
president; Philip J. Riede, BPA '54, 
vice president; Bartow Bridges, Jr., 
Agr. '53, secretary/treasurer. A 
Board of Directors will be elected at 
a later meeting of the club. 



Along with congratulations on his 
election, Dan Arris gets a special 
thanks for coordinating and arranging 
the Alumni Rally activities. We can- 
not overlook the major contribution 
of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Phillips and Mrs. 
Arris who worked so hard behind the 
scenes. Mrs. Phillips is the former 
Mary Wu, Nurs '57; Mrs. Phillips is 
the former Mary Joyce Cosgrove, PE 
'56. 

In addition to members of the Uni- 
versity administrative staff and the 
football coaching staff, a number of 
Terrapin Club members attended the 
rally. Among the alumni from the 
general Norfolk area who attended 
were General and Mrs. Joseph C. 
Burger, A&S '25, Col. Martin J. 
Sexton, Educ. '41, Dr. James C. 
Davis, Dental '39, J. W. Miller, BPA 
'39, James B. Graham, Educ. '35, 
Robert Condon, BPA '42, Capt. and 
Mrs. Lawrence D. Conway, Jr., BPA 
'53, G. W. Chapman, BPA '64, Rob- 
ert Molloy, Eng. '53, Sam Ludlum, 
Agr. '24, Mr. and Mrs. Richard 
Gossom, A&S '58-A&S '59, Bart 
Bridges, Agr. '53, and Philip Riede, 
BPA '55. 

The performance of the football 
team the following day put the cap 
on the weekend as Maryland defeated 
North Carolina 10 to 9 in the Oyster 
Bowl. 




12 



the Maryland Magazine 







Alumni, lot i to right: II Burton Shiplej . 
General Joseph Burgei .uni Mis Shipley. 



Col. Schutz and Daniel Arris, Presi- 
dent of the new Norfolk. Alumni 
Club, BPA '54. 




President of the University of Maryland Alumni Association Erna R. Chapman: 
Dr. Wilson H. Elkins. President of the University; Mary Arris and Joy Phillips. 







November-December, 1964 



13 








Tom Hickey 



Jerry Fishman 



Phil Denkevitz 



Mike Cole 



Inside Maryland Sports 

by Bill Dismer 
Director of Sports Information 

STILL TINGLING FROM A FOOTBALL SEASON WHICH SAW THEIR 
Terps finish with three successive victories (two of them 
shutouts) for a 5-5 record, Maryland sports fans continue to 
dwell on several outstanding feats of the gridiron year despite 
the onrush of winter sports. 

Sharing the individual spotlight was the most prominent 
of a predominantly-sophomore team, Tom "Bo" Hickey, 215- 
pound tailback from Stamford, Conn., who not only led 
Maryland's ground attack with a 4.9-yard average rush, but 
came within 10 yards of tying the all-time record for Terrapin 
ground-gainers. Hickey's net yardage — an amazing 894 — 
was exceeded only by the 904 yards gained by Lou Gambino 
back in 1947. 

In the limelight with Hickey was the junior Jerry Fishman 
who unselfishly gave up the glory of an offensive back to 
become an outstanding defensive star. Fishman, whose color- 
ful gestures in inciting the defensive line were conspicuous 
in every game, not only was the talk of College Park but 
the entire Atlantic Coast Conference, as illustrated by his 
selection to the all-ACC team at the end of the season. Both 
will be among the 37 members of this year's squad who'll 
return next year to battle Penn State, Ohio University and 
Syracuse in the first three games (all at home) and then go 
on to meet Wake Forest, North Carolina, N. C. State, South 
Carolina, Navy, Clemson and Virginia. 



Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. Two years ago sellout 
crowds were present every night. 



Coach Bud Millikan's hopes were high as the basketball 
season got under way December 2 and well they should be. 
Ten lettermen were back from last year's squad and five 
promising sophs were up from a freshman team which lost 
only once in 16 starts. Two of the sophs were in the starting 
lineup against Penn State on December 2 — Jay McMillen, 
6-7 forward who led the yearlings in scoring last year with 
a 23.4 average, and Gary Williams, classy little 6-0 guard 
whom Millikan calls his fastest floorman. Juniors Gary Ward, 
Rick Wise and Neil Brayton completed the five which took 
the floor at the season's initial tap-off. 

Don't forget the NCAA's regional playoffs will be at Cole 
Field House in March, being held the week following the 



Coach Doyle Royal's soccer team, 8-2 for the regular 
season, put up a stiff fight in the first round of the NCAA 
playoffs at East Lansing, Michigan, only to lose a heart-break- 
ing 1-0 decision when Michigan State scored with only four 
minutes to play. Although the Terp booters have yet to win 
a national championship in this sport, they've come close the 
last four years, and perennially are rated among the country's 
best. 

The Carmichael Cup, symbolic of athletic supremacy in 
the Atlantic Coast Conference, could be headed back toward 
Maryland after one year's possession by North Carolina if 
early successes in the current scholastic year are indicative. 
The Terps are off to a good start with championships in soccer 
and cross-country and a tie for third place in football. Inci- 
dentally, Coach Jim Kehoe's thinclads broke North Caro- 
lina's four-year stranglehold on the cross-country title, win- 
ning it with 45 points compared to the Tar Heels' 72. Mary- 
land's team was composed of George Henry, Don Wann, 
Mike George, Dick French and Milton Matthews. 



Three football players and a lacrosse star were among 
those receiving top honors at the M Club's 14th annual 
awards banquet at Washington's Statler-Hilton December 5. 
Olaf Drozdov, Maryland's first three-sports star since Tommy 
Mont, was awarded the Guckeyson Trophy given to an out- 
standing athlete, scholar and gentleman who has participated 
in at least two sports. He was the unanimous choice of the 
university's coaches. 

Dave Nardo, a graduate of last June and end on the '63 
team, received the George C. Cook Memorial trophy as the 
team's best blocker. Larry Bagranoff, junior tackle this year, 
was awarded the James M. Tatum trophy as the top lineman 
of 1964. 

Fred Betz, Maryland's All-America lacrosse midfielder 
last spring, was awarded the C. P. McCormick trophy given 
annually to the Baltimore area athlete who has contributed 
most to Maryland sports during his senior year. 



The rest of this column was contributed by my two fine 
student assistants, Linn Hendershot and Bob Stumpff, who 



14 



the Maryland Magazine 




Jim Pitt 

write on their specialties — baseball, swimming and wrestling. 
Hendershot has managed Maryland's baseball team the past 
two years while Stumpff is in his second year of the same 
role with the wrestling team. 



Here come the Terps! The 1964-65 edition of the Terp 
tankers features some of the most outstanding swimmers to 
come to Maryland in a long time. 

Thirteen lettermen are featured on this year's team. They 
are Bill Doheny, Donald "Doc" Dunphy, James Green, John 
Harding, Eric Lampe, Thomas Manfredi, James McCaslin, 
William Nullmeyer, Raoul Rebillard, Robert Wimbrow, and 
James Williams. 

Coach Bill Campbell considers this his strongest team in 
his eight years of coaching. Coach Campbell recently stated 
that he expects this year's team to rewrite the entire varsity 
record book. 

One of the brighest spots in Maryland swimming is a 
young sophomore from Baltimore, Md., Phil Denkevitz. "I 
hope Phil continues to improve on his NCAA freshman 
record performance," said Coach Campbell, "If he does, we 
could be real tough." Phil set two NCAA freshman records 
last year when he swam the 50-yd. frestyle in 21.0 and the 
100-yd. freestyle in 47.3. 

Maryland, the ACC champion in 1964, looks to be one of 
the fine teams in the nation. 



The 1964-65 President of the M-Club is one of the most 
outstanding athletes to come to the University of Maryland 
in a long time. 

Mike Cole, a native of Hampton, Virginia and a senior, 
came to the University of Maryland in 1961. Since coming 
to the University, the slim broad jumper and sprinter has 
rewritten the record books. He is currently the IC4A and 
Atlantic Coast Conference Indoor and Outdoor Broad Jump 
Champion. He is also the University of Maryland and ACC 
recordholder in this event. Mike leaped 24'7" indoors and 
24'7%" outdoors. He qualified for the Olympic final trials 
in the broad jump. 

Besides being the M-Club President, Mike is a member of 
the American Society of Civil Engineers and a member of 
the executive council of Phi Delta Theta. He was the re- 
cipient of the Sportsmanship Award rewarded by the Prince 
George's Chamber of Commerce last year and the Talbot T. 
Speer Award that goes to the athlete who excels in leader- 
ship, scholarship and all-around ability. 



"1 like working with kids, and some da) through 
I might develop anothei Mantle.' rhiswasth 
from inn Pitt, the I niversit) ol Marylani 
centerfielder, when the slim blonde was asked 
continuing al the i niversit] 

Pitt, a native ol Dundalk, is a junioi al the i niversit) ol 
Maryland majoring in Physical Education with a nun. 
the Biological Sciences. 

After completing the i l ">4 baseball season and setting .. 
new Atlantic ( oast ( onference batting record ol 
young rerp was faced with one ol the biggesl decisions ol ins 
life. Jim could cither sign a major league contract oi return 
to the A.C.C. 

Alter much thought, the v< '" outfielder signed a contract 
with the Minnesota ["wins ol the American Baseball League 

"I realize main ball players do nol make the big lea • 
said Pitt, "so I know I have to get thai degree Pitl stated 

that some day he would like to become a College coach W 
asked what sport, he replied. What else, baseball ol COUI 

Jim will be at the Universit) until the end ol the firsl 

semester. He then leaves lor the sun-lillcd skies ol Morula 
He is to report to the parent club, the I wins, at Melbourne, 
Florida. 

Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse will take his 1964-63 

Terrapin mat team to New London, Conn., on December 
4-5 for the annual U. S. Coast Guard Aeadeim [burnament 
This will be Maryland's second appearance in this season 
opener for 16 of the Eastern wrestling teams. 

Since the Terps will be lacking depth of previous Maryland 
teams with only 19 men on the varsity roster, injuries could 
play havoc with the makings of one of the best teams Coach 
Krouse has ever put on a mat. Spearheading the team will 
be returning lettermen Nelson Aurand-147, Olaf Drozdov- 
HVW, John Henderson- 137, Buddy Hepfer-147, Bob Kop- 
nisky-157, Gary Langer-130, Tom Norris-123. Tom Schlei- 
cher- 123, and Amando Soto- 167. Aurand, Henderson. Kop- 
nisky, Schleicher, and Soto are also returning ACC Champs. 
Outstanding Sophomores from last year's undefeated fresh- 
men team include Jim Arnoult-123. Milt Thomas- 130, Kent 
Webster- 137, and Bob Karch-177. 

In addition, the Terrapins have a great schedule this year 
with conference foes Virginia and North Carolina State and 
perennial national powers Army. Navy, and Iowa State all 
visiting Cole Field House. And on the road the Terps have 
the Coast Guard Tourney, Pitt. Penn State. Duke, and North 
Carolina. 

Iowa State, which last year finished third in the nation and 
had five All-Americans. should be the biggest drawing card. 
But the Terps put on their best show in history at the NCAA 
Tourney last year as they returned to College Park with three 
All-Americans (Bob Kopniskv-1 57. Tim Geiger-167, and 
Marshall Dauberman-177) out of four entered in the Tourna- 
ment. They also finished ninth in the nation. 

Dauberman is gone through graduation and Geiger won't 
be wrestling this year, but kopnisky is back and as smooth 
as ever. 

Maryland will be after its 12th ACC title on March 5-6. 
as it again hosts the conference tournament at Cole. 1 ast >ear 
Maryland only claimed seven out of ten champs, but will he 
out for complete monopoly again this year. Only in the I 1 ) hi 
tourney did they enjoy this accomplished teat though. 

Coach Sully Krouse has a 17-year conference record oi 
70 wins against 6 losses, and a winning streak ol 59 con- 
ference meets in a row including the final nine dual meets m 
the Southern Conference. He has never had a losing season. 
with a 5-5-0 record in the first season of competition as a 
major varsity sport in 1947-48. He has also had 77 individual 
Atlantic Coast Conference Champions ol a possible 98. 

Freshmen coach Jim Sauve is starting his tirst year off 
with a real bang as he has not only the largest number o\ 
freshmen candidates but also the largest freshmen schedule 
ever before. 



November-December, 1964 



15 




DECEMBER 

20 Choir concert: "Messiah," Fague 
Springmann, conductor, Music 
Department 

JANUARY 



4 Basketball vs. North Carolina 
9 Swimming vs. Pittsburgh 

1 1 Student Recital, Music l 

Department 2 

12 Concert Band concert, Hubert 4 

Henderson and Acton Ostling, 5 

conductors, Music Department 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

13 Basketball vs. Navy 

13 Piano recital, Kathleen Haley, 
Music Department 

14 National Symphony Orchestra 
concert 

16 Swimming vs. Navy 

16 Wrestling vs. Iowa State 

FEBRUARY 



Swimming vs. Duke 
Spring Semester begins 
Engineering Alumni Dinner 
Baltimore Alumni Club Oyster 
Roast 



5 
11 

13 
15 
16 

17 



23 

25 

25 
26 
27 



Swimming vs. V.M.I. 

The Romeros: classical and 

flamenco guitarists 
Wrestling vs. Navy 
Swimming vs. South Carolina 
Swimming vs. Clemson 
Basketball vs. Virginia 
University Chamber Orchestra 

concert 
Basketball vs. Duks 
National Symphony Orchestra 

concert 
A.A.C. Swim Meet 
Basketball vs. Clemson 
Basketball vs. South Carolina 






Alumnus Gives Recreation Area 
to City Children 



One of New York's leading landlords, 
Samuel J. Lefrak, BPA '40, was honored 
for having provided his tenants with a 
baseball field and other recreational 
facilities in Lefrak City, 40-acre apart- 
ment community in Forest Hills, 
Queens. 

Mr. Lefrak, who heads the Lefrak 
Organization, received a trophy from a 
committee of youngsters and parents 
representing the several hundred mem- 
bers that make up the Lefrak City Boys' 
Baseball League. 

The delegation expressed appreciation 
to their landlord for having had the 
foresight to include in the city-within- 
a-city a four-acre baseball diamond, as 
well as basketball and tennis courts, 
swimming pools, ice skating, roller skat- 
ing, playgrounds and other recreational 
facilities. The ball field is used for foot- 



ball and soccer in the fall and spring 
months. 

Ted Kaback, general manager of the 
Lefrak City Boys' Baseball League, said, 
"Mr. Lefrak exemplifies the true sports- 
man who believes in providing the kind 
of recreational facilities that will not 
only keep our youngsters in good physi- 
cal condition but involved in a program 
of wholesome sports activities." 

Mr. Lefrak, who was on the track 
and field team of the University of 
Maryland, races thoroughbreds under 
the blue and orange colors of his Mary- 
land Farm Stable. He is a great booster 
of the New York Mets and has ex- 
pressed the hope that Lefrak City is 
nurturing a future baseball great who 
will some day bring glory to his favorite 
team. 



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16 



the Maryland Magazine 



HEC Alumni Meet 

The Board of the College of Home 
Economics Chapter of the University of 
Maryland Alumni Association held their 
fall meeting Friday evening, October 1ft, 
at the home of Dr. Selma Lippeatt, Dean 
of the College of Home Economics. 

Officers serving for 1964-65 are: Miss 
Margaret T. Loar, '41, Chairman; Mrs. 
Doris Thompson Terry, '43, Vice Chair- 
man; Mrs. Paula Snyder Nalley, '39, 
Secretary; Mrs. Catherine Cockran 
Baxter, '45, Treasurer; Mrs. Betty Rho- 
derick Bures, '57, Corresponding Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Mary Charlotte Farmington 
Chaney, '42, Executive Secretary and 
Historian. Ex-officio members include 
the immediate Past President, Mrs. Mary 
W. Davis, '55, and Dean Selma Lippeatt. 

Reports of the June and September 
Alumni Council meetings were given by 
Mrs. Terry and Mrs. Nalley. Other rep- 
resentatives of the Board are: Miss Loar, 
and Alternate Mrs. Erna Reidel Chap- 
man, '34, who is also President of the 
University of Maryland Alumni Asso- 
ciation, 1964-65. Those serving on 
Alumni Council Committees are Mrs. 
Terry, Alumni-Student-Faculty Rela- 
tions; Mrs. Nalley, Special Events and 
Projects; and Miss Loar, Publications 
and Publicity. 

Other elected members of the Board 
are: Mrs. Virginia Van Derwerker Pace, 
'53; Mrs. Nancy Simmons Kenny, '48; 
Mrs. Virginia Orser Righter, "57; Mrs. 
Dessie Buser Moxley, '59; and Mrs. 
Barbara Dodd Hillerman, '56. 

Two special projects of the Board 
are: to interest more graduates of the 
College of Home Economics in the 
welfare of their College and in their 
Alumni Association Chapter; to sell 
stationery with a beautiful line drawing 
of Margaret Brent Hall (see advertise- 
ment in this issue of The Maryland 
Magazine). 

The Annual Spring Meeting of this 
Chapter will be held May 15, 1965, in 
Margaret Brent Hall and Alumni Mem- 
bers are encouraged to mark this date 
on their calendar and plan to attend. 



Alumni Clubs See Musical 

Two alumni clubs had the opportunity 
to preview the student production of 
Cole Porter's musical, "Anything Goes," 
which was chosen by the American 
Education Association and the USO for 
a two-month tour of military bases in 
Germany. 

The Montgomery County Alumni 
Club sponsored a theater party in Octo- 
ber. The Baltimore Alumni Club spon- 
sored a production of the show in Balti- 
more in November. 

The musical production, under the 
direction of Dr. Rudolph Pugliese, Asso- 
ciate Professor of Speech and Dramatic 
Arts, has a cast of 17. 







C^oLt£ij£ or syo)ii£ iZconomia, LLniv tii.it u <.y &\\a\uuuul 

ALUMNI 

STATIONERY 

AVAILABLE 

1 his handsome stationery is now available to 
Maryland alumni. This is French-fold note paper, printed 
on a soft ivory stock. The illustration above shows the 
actual size. The line drawing of Margaret Brent Hall was 
drawn by Robert J. Dentz, a member of the faculty of the 
College. The stationery is being sold exclusively by C al- 
lege of Home Economics Alumni Chapter. The price is 
$1 per package of 12, with envelopes. 

Order now. Complete the order blank below and send 
to the University of Maryland Alumni Association. 
Administration Building. University of Maryland, College 
Park, Maryland 20742.^ 



Please send 



packages of stationery io 



Name 



Address 



Amount enclosed cheek 



Money order 



Make cheek payable to College of Home Economics Alumni 
Chapter. (Please add 12 cents to cover cosl of mailing. ) 



November-December, 1964 



17 



Alumnus Writes Stamp 
Article 

Robert N. Pritchard, LL.B. '47, realtor 
of Aurora. Illinois, has recently pub- 
lished an article, "Stamps: Real Estate 
Promotion and Relaxing Hobby for 
Realtors." in the nationally circulated 
Realtor's Headlines. The article advo- 
cates the use of philately — the science 
and study of stamps — as a promotion 
device in real estate. Pritchard, an en- 
thusiastic philatelist, said that commem- 
orative stamps which feature famous 
homes can cause a desire for home 
ownership. 

Philately is the largest organized 
hobby and more publications are de- 
voted to philately than any other hobby, 
Pritchard said. This popularity is due 
to many factors, such as the variety, 
investment, and enjoyment in collections 
felt by most collectors. The monetary 
value of many items has brought in- 
vestors into the field. 

Pritchard, one time championship 
tennis player, has written several articles 
for stamp publications and has won a 
number of international awards for his 
entries at stamp exhibitions throughout 
the world. 



Homemakers Leave for 
Honolulu 

Sixty-six Maryland homemakers escort- 
ed by ten husbands will jet from Balti- 
more's Friendship International Airport 
to Honolulu, Hawaii, to the annual 
National Extension Homemakers' Coun- 
cil Meeting. 

They and 2,800 others from the 
Mainland will "join hands in fellowship 
and education with sisters of this young- 
est state." Their theme is "Today's Home 
Builds Tomorrow's World." 

Accompanied by Miss Margaret Loar, 
HE '41, acting state leader, Extension 
Home Economics, University of Mary- 
land, and President of the Home Eco- 
nomics Alumni Board, the Free State 
delegation from 12 counties and Balti- 
more City will hear speakers from gov- 
ernment and educational institutions, 
and attend workshops on international 
relations, civil defense, citizenship, fam- 
ily life, safety, health, and publicity. 

The women are representatives of the 
Maryland State Council of Homemak- 
ers' Clubs, which works with the Mary- 
land Cooperative Extension Service to 
glean the latest research and informa- 
tion on consumer, family, and commu- 
nity problems. 






Alumnus Returns as Student and 
Finds Transformation and Challenge 



HOW DOES IT FEEL TO TRAVEL ON 

(almost) the same footpaths you used 
twenty-three years ago?" Catherine 
McCarron, B.S. '41, says, "At first I 
felt a little like Rip Van Winkle might 
have, but now that the adjustment is 
over, I'm enjoying everything tremen- 
dously — the mental stimulation, the 
associations and the academic atmos- 
phere." 

Miss McCarron returned last spring 
to earn her master's degree in home 
economics after serving her profession 
for eighteen years as a home economist 
for electric utilities in Southern Mary- 
land and Virginia. 

During her career she became a mem- 
ber of the American Home Economics 
Association and its Washington branch, 
and was elected Chairman of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia Home Economists in 
the Business section of that organiza- 
tion. 

A fifth generation Washingtonian, her 
other affiliations are Alpha Delta Pi, the 
Columbia Historical Society, and the 
University Women's Club. She was 
selected for inclusion in the 1964-65 
edition of Who's Who of American 
Women. 

Most alumni realize the many changes 
that have occurred at the University 
since the pre-war period. However, 
Catherine insists only one who lived as 
a student among 3,500 and then re- 



turned to confront 23,000 has experi- 
enced the real transformation. 

One of the more vivid incidents she 
tells about concerns the day she saw 
an announcement in the student news- 
paper, The Diamondback, inviting all 
to hear about the "Characteristics of 
the Maryland Student." New on the 
campus, she thought this might be a 
valuable short-cut to getting to know 
the 1964 student body. She arrived at 
the appointed room early, and was 
surprised to see so many mature people 
pursuing their education. 

Finally the meeting was called to 
order, and after the minutes from the 
last session were read, she whispered — 
slightly panicky — to her seat compan- 
ion, "Is this a meeting of the Faculty 
Club?" The answer came back, "No, 
it's the American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors." Catherine feels the 
"togetherness" movement has spread 
from the home to the university world. 

When asked if she had any advice for 
her colleagues and contemporaries who 
might be interested in continuing their 
education, Miss McCarron said that 
most of all they needed reassurance. 
She said the initial shock passes quickly; 
the challenge is exciting and, best of all, 
mature students feel qualified to start a 
brand new career (and a new life) at a 
time when too many people feel their 
best years have passed. 




"And let's talk about 
your future" 

Most engineers want the same things: good 
pay, stability and, if you're the kind of fellow 
we like to talk to, you want assignments that 
stir your mind. 

GOOD PAY. Where do you stand in the 
educational and experience tables? You'll 
earn accordingly. 

STABILITY. For 77 years Westinghouse 
has been a leader in the scientific field, and 
our far-flung projects have attracted many 
outstanding scientists and engineers. 

STIMULATING ASSIGNMENTS. At 

Westinghouse you'll find research and devel- 
opment projects in molecular electronics, bi- 
onics, optical physics, Pulse Doppler Radar, 
LASER, advanced weapons systems and 
other challenging fields. 

Pull up a chair . . . and let's have a heart 
to heart talk about your future. 

To arrange an interview call SOuthfield 
1-1000, Ext. 657 or send resume to: 

Mr. L. W. Henderson 
DEPT. 404 



Westinghouse 



DEFENSE CENTER 
BALTIMORE 

P. 0. Box 1693, 

Baltimore 3, Md. 

Air Arm Ordnance 

Electronics Systems 

An Equal Opportunity Employer 



'W 



18 



the Maryland Magazine 



Through 

The 

Years 



EDITOR'S NOTE: The success of 
"Through The Years" is dependent upon 
your contribution of newsworthy items 
— information concerning yourself or 
your alumni friends. We earnestly solicit 
your assistance in this endeavor. Send 
information to the Alumni Office, Col- 
lege Park, Maryland. 

1920-1929 

Dr. Charles Harold Howe, m.s. 
'23, who was Dean of the Graduate 
School at Kansas State University, will 
become Dean of the Graduate School 
at St. Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. 

W. David R. Straughn, a graduate 
student at U. of M. 1925-1928, assistant 
to the marketing directors in the Textile 
Fibers Department, will retire at the end 
of the month after 35 years with the 
Du Pont Company. Mr. Straughn joined 
Du Pont in 1929 as a research chemist 
in the Technical Division at Buffalo, 
N. Y. Subsequently he was assigned to 
cellophane and was supervisor of cello- 
phane research at Buffalo before being 
transferred to Wilmington in 1941 to 
do technical development work in con- 
nection with viscose process rayon. Two 
years later Mr. Straughn was made man- 
ager of staple fiber sales in the Rayon 
Division and became manager of tire 
yarn sales in 1944. He was made district 
sales manager of the Rayon Division at 
Providence, R. I., in 1947 and was 
transferred to the Acetate Division in 
Wilmington in 1949 as manager of the 
technical service section for acetate and 
"Orion" acrylic fiber. Mr. Straughn was 
born at Snow Hill, Md. He received a 
B.S. degree in chemistry at Washington 
College in 1921 and did his graduate 
work in physical and organic chemistry 
at University of Maryland from 1925- 
28. 

Ben Dyer, Engr. '29, has been elected 
president of the Potomac Chapter of the 
Maryland Society of Professional Engi- 
neers. He is president of Ben Dyer Asso- 
ciates, Inc., Riverdale, Md., and is a 
partner of Werner-Dyer & Associates. 



1930-1939 

Charles H. Berry, Engr. '34 and 
Educ. '37, has been appointed Vice 
President of General Precision, Inc., 
and assigned as Corporate Manager of 
the company's Washington, D. C, office. 
Mr. Berry formerly was special assist- 



ant to the president ol General Preci 
sion's Aerospace Group, Little Falls 
New Jersey. Mr. Berrj hasovei .'I years 
experience in the aerospace ami avionics 
industries anil has served in various 
management and marketing capacities 
with General Precision lor over eleven 
years. A native ol Maryland, he holds 
memberships in the American Ordnance 
Association, the Institute ol 1 Icctucal 
and Electronic Engineers and the Aero- 
space Industries Association. A resident 
of Ridgewood, New Jersey, Mr. Berrj 
will be moving his home to Washington, 
D. C. 

David C. Holly, m.a. '39, has been 
added to The American Universitj 
faculty for the 1964-65 academic year. 
Commander Holly, prior to his associa- 
tion with AU. served with the Office 
of Naval Intelligence where he headed 
the national intelligence estimates sec- 
tion. He also served as naval attache 
to the U. S. Embassy in London, and 
as executive officer of the U.S.S. Telfair, 
a Navy troop transport. The Com- 
mander, a native of Philadelphia, re- 
ceived his Ph.D. from AU this past 
June. He earned his B.S. at Johns Hop- 
kins University in 1938 and his M.A. 
from the University of Maryland in 
1939. From 1951 to 1953 he taught 
chemistry at the Naval Academy in 
Annapolis. 

Walter L. Miller, Jr., A&S '39, has 
been awarded a M-EDC degree by East 
Texas State College. 



1940-1949 

Dr. Leonard T. Kurland, Med. '45, 
has been appointed to the staff of the 
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, as 
head of the section of Biometry and 



Medical Statistics I )i kuilalld en' 

the Mayo < iraduatc School ol Med 
in 1952 as a fellow in neurolog) .md 
served as a research B 

statistics from 195 I t>> 19 i 

past 9 \eals I )i K ill l.ilnl has Ken With 

the i s Public Health Sei 



1950 1959 

Dr. ( ii <ik(,i S Bi ntini 

and a meinhei ol \lpha I an On 
was married on June <>. 1964, to Miss 

Alula Ortiz-Santamayor ol Mayaguez, 

Puerto Rico, ill Safe ( hapcl at ( oinell 

University. Dr. Bunting is Assistant 
Professor ol Botanj at the H Bailej 
Horatorium, Cornell University His 
wile is a graduate student working i"i 
her doctorate in Botany. 

Ma.iok \\ ii l i \M P. Hi i<(.> . P. I 
"50, has graduated from the flying train- 
ing course for U. S. Air Force ( -124 
transport pilots at linker AFB, Okla, 

Major Burgy, now qualified lor aircrew 
duty On the four-engine Olohcmaster. 
is being assigned to Hickam AIM . 
Hawaii. His unit supports the Military 
Air Transport Service mission of pro- 
viding global airlift of U. S. military 
forces and equipment. 

The promotion of Robert T. Frisa, 
A&S '50, to Regional Sales Manager 
of Roche Laboratories, Hoffmann-La 
Roche, Inc. Mr. Frisa's new responsibili- 
ties will cover a region of 1 1 southern 
and southwestern states, although he 
will be headquartered in Nutley. New 
Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. Frisa and their 
four daughters reside at 315 Plantation 
Drive. Cinnaminson, N. J. 

Lr. Coi . Ellis B. McQ intick, UC 
'50, was a summer graduate from the 
Air War Collene, the U. S. Air Force's 



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senior professional school, at the Air 
University, Maxwell A.F.B., Ala. Doctor 
Edward L. Katzenbach, Jr.. deputy 
assistant. Secretary of Defense for Edu- 
cation, addressed the graduates as they 
marked the end of 10 months of inten- 
sive study. The university-level course 
provides senior officers a better under- 
standing of the elements of national 
power and aerospace resources, prepar- 
ing the graduates for higher level com- 
mand and staff positions. Colonel Mc- 
Clintick is being reassigned to the Stra- 
tegic Air Command's (SAC) 28th Bomb 
Wing at Ellsworth A.F.B., S. D., as a 
staff officer. 

The Transportation Association of 
America has announced the promotion 
of Frank A. Smith, BPA '50, to vice 
president-research. Mr. Smith has been 
the association's director of research for 
nine years, a field in which he will con- 
tinue. A native of Washington, he is a 
graduate of the University of Maryland. 
He is a member of the American Eco- 
nomic Association and active in the 
Naval Reserve. Prior to joining the 
association, he was with the United 
States Chamber of Commerce. 

Captain Charles B. Fyock, Engr. 
'5 1 , graduated recently from the U. S. 
Air Force Command and Staff College 
at the Air University, Maxwell A.F.B., 
Ala. The captain, a graduate of McKin- 
Iey Technical High School, Washington, 
D. C, received B.S. and M.E. degrees 
from the University of Maryland. 

Walter M. Prichard, BPA '51, 
former procurement manager for Atlan- 
tic Research Corp., has been named to 
head a new materials management de- 
partment for Atlantic's principal labora- 
tories in Alexandria, Va. The new de- 
partment will consolidate the principal 
laboratories procurement department, 
the government property office and the 
shipping and receiving activities. 

Major Rolf S. Scovell, UC '51, is 
a member of the 329th Fighter Inter- 
ceptor Squadron at George A.F.B., 
Calif., which won the coveted Hughes 
Trophy as the most outstanding fighter 
interceptor unit in the U. S. Air Force. 
Major Scovell is an aircraft maintenance 
officer with the Air Defense Command's 
(ADC) F-106 Delta Dart unit which 
was selected by USAF for outstanding 
achievement in operational readiness, 
weapons reliability, intercept capability 
and flying safety. His squadron supports 
the ADC mission of guarding the con- 
tinental U. S. against enemy air attack. 
The Hughes Trophy was established in 
1952 by USAF and the aviation indus- 
try to stimulate unit pride and competi- 
tive spirit among interceptor squadrons 
engaged in air defense. 

Captain William G. Bastedo, UC 
'52, was a recent graduate from the U. S. 
Air Force Command and Staff College 
at the Air University, Maxwell A.F.B., 
Ala. The captain is a member of Delta 
Tau Delta. 




Captain Robert A. Harrington, 
Agr. '52, recently graduated from the 
Air Force Institute of Technology's 
School of Systems and Logistics at 
Wright-Patterson A.F.B., Ohio. Captain 
Harrington, who received his M.S. de- 
gree in logistics management, is being 
reassigned to the Pentagon in Washing- 
ton, D. C. The captain received his 
commission upon completion of the Re- 
serve Officer Training Corps program at 
the University of Maryland. 

Jack Sargent, m.s. '52, Electrical 
Engineering, was Control System Tech- 
nical Officer for the Nimbus Weather 
Satellite recently launched from the Pa- 
cific Missile Range in California by the 
National Aero- 
nautics and Space 
Administration's 
Goddard Space 
Flight Center in 
Greenbelt, Md. 
He provided tech- 
nical direction to 
the sub-contractor 
for the design, 
construction and 
testing of the 
Nimbus Control System. It was also 
his responsibility to evaluate and pass 
judgment on technical data to make 
sure that the system met with require- 
ments. During the integration and final 
testing of this system, he acted as a 
consultant. 

Captain Gilbert E. Shortt, A&S 
'52, and a member of Phi Kappa Tau, 
recently graduated from the U. S. Air 
Force Command and Staff College at 
the Air University, Maxwell A.F.B., 
Ala. 

John H. Orem, Agr. '53, has been 
appointed a market specialist in Mon- 
santo Company's Organic Chemicals 
Division, St. Louis, Mo., after serving 
as a senior sales representative in the 
division's New York district. 

Captain Donald W. Stultz, Engr. 
'53, has completed a special manage- 
ment course at the Air Force Institute 
of Technology's (AFIT) Systems and 
Logistics School at Wright-Patterson 
A.F.B., Ohio. Captain Stultz received 
advanced training in the techniques used 
in program management of Air Force 
weapon and support systems. The cap- 
tain is returning to Norton A.F.B., 
Calif., where he is a development engi- 
neering officer in a unit that supports 
the Air Force Systems mission of re- 
search, development and testing of Air 
Force planes and missile systems. 

William J. Burns, Mil. Sci. '54, has 
been appointed an executive vice presi- 
dent of Tri-State Motor Transit Co., 
motor carrier of ammunition, explosives, 
missiles and radioactive materials. He 
will be in charge of traffic and sales for 
the company's Eastern Division. Since 
1953 Burns has been managing director 
of the Munitions Carriers Conference 
and general manager of the Movers 



20 



the Maryland Magazine 



Conference of America. He is chairman 
of the board of the Washington Chapter 
of the National Defense Transportation 
Association and is vice president of the 
Traffic Club of Washington. 

Captain Henry L. Collomb, BPA 
'54, is in the field with U. S. Air Force 
Tactical Air Command (TAC) units 
now engaged in Exercise Desert Strike 
being conducted by the U. S. Strike 
Command. The captain, permanently 
assigned to England A.F.B., La., re- 
ceived his B.S. degree from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

Captain William R. Kenty, A&S 
'54, is in the field with U. S. Air Force 
Tactical Air Command (TAC) units 
now engaged in Exercise Desert Strike 
being conducted by the U. S. Strike 
Command. The realistic combat opera- 
tion is the largest joint air-ground train- 
ing maneuver in the southwest since 
World War II. Captain Kenty, a tactical 
fighter pilot, and other members of 
TAC's jet fighter, reconnaissance, air 
assault and support units are providing 
firepower and other tactical air support 
for the U. S. Army battlefield troops 
participating. The exercise will run 
through May 30 on 13,000,000 acres of 
desert land in California, Arizona and 
Nevada. Major elements of the Military 
Air Transport Service and Air Force 
Communications Service, plus Strategic 
Air Command jet aerial refueling tank- 
ers, also are providing airpower needed 
in the combat maneuver. The captain, 
permanently assigned to Cannon A.F.B., 
N. M., is a member of Sigma Chi. 

October 15 was the last day for Miss 
Eldora E. Keske, Educ. '54, to head 
the International Farm Youth Exchange 
(IFYE) program of the National 4-H 
Club Foundation. After three years with 
the organization, she is returning to her 
home state and to her previous position 
as assistant state 4-H leader with the 
University of Wisconsin Agricultural 
Extension Service at Madison. Miss 
Keske has been acting program leader 
of the exchange program since early 
this year. Previously, she was associate 
program leader and chief liaison be- 
tween the 4-H Foundation and the state 
IFYE program leaders. 

Colonel Louis Miller, Jr., b.s.. 
Mil. Sci. '54, has assumed the position of 
deputy commander for a U. S. Air Force 
support wing at Misawa A.B., Japan 
Colonel Miller 
served at San An- 
tonio prior to his 
appointment at 
Misawa. The col- 
onel, who has 24 
years military 
duty, was com- 
missioned in 1942 
upon completion 
of Officer Candi- 
date School. He 
served in the China-Burma-India Thea- 
ter of Operations during World War II. 

November-December, J 964 




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Colonel Miller attended the University 
of Maryland and the University of Col- 
orado. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees. 

Moe Schneebaum, M.S. and A&S '54, 
a native of Brooklyn, New York, was 
Spacecraft Manager for the Nimbus 
Weather Satellite recently launched from 
the Pacific Missile Range in California 
by the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration's Goddard Space Flight 
Center in Greenbelt, Md. He was 
responsible for developing and integrat- 
ing the cameras, controls and the Pulse 
Code Modulation (PCM) command 
system into the spacecraft. Mr. Schnee- 
baum received his B.S. degree in physics 
from the College of Cay in 1947 and 
his Master's degree in physics in 1954 
from the University of Maryland. Prior 
to joining Goddard in August 1960, he 
worked for the Naval Weapons Plant. 
He lives in the Washington, D. C, area 
with his wife and two children. 

Ray B. Sitton, Mil. Sci. '54, has been 
promoted to colonel in the U. S. Air 
Force at OfFutt A.F.B., Neb. Colonel 
Sitton is chief of the operations and 
training branch in a unit that supports 
the Strategic Air Command mission of 
keeping the nation's intercontinental 
missiles and jet bombers on constant 
alert. The colonel was commissioned 
through the aviation cadet program. 

Conrad S. Posey, BPA '55, manager 
of the Foreign Shipping Department of 
the Security Storage Co. of Washington, 
has been appointed assistant vice presi- 
dent. He joined the company in 1955 
and has been with it since, except for 
three years of military service. 

Colonel Cyril J. Reap, Mil. Sci. 
'55, of Dunmore, Pa., has arrived for 
duty with a unit of the Air Photographic 
and Charting Service (APCS), a major 
sub-command of the Military Air Trans- 
port Service, at Turner A.F.B., Ga. 
Colonel Reap, deputy commander for 
materiel in the 1370th Photo-Mapping 
Wing at Turner, previously served at 
Hunter A.F.B., Ga. His new unit sup- 
ports the APCS mission of providing 
documentary photographic services for 
Air Force units around the world. The 
colonel received his commission in 1941 
upon completion of the Air Force Re- 
serve Officer Training Corps program 
at the University of Maryland. He re- 
ceived his B.S. degree from the univer- 
sity. 

T/S William G. Richardson, Mil. 
Sci. '55, has completed the special U. S. 
Air Force recruiter course at Lackland 
A.F.B., Tex. Sergeant Richardson, 
whose previous assignment was at the 
Air Force Reserve Officer Training 
Corps unit at the University of Mary- 
land in College Park, was selected 
for the special assignment as a volunteer 
with an outstanding military record. The 
sergeant was trained in II areas of 
study, including the Air Force job clas- 
sification system, testing procedures and 
community relations to broaden his 



qualifications for presenting the facts of 
Air Force career opportunities to young 
men and women. 

Bruce White, Educ. '55, art super- 
visor at University School who spent 
the summer teaching studio painting and 
sculpture in the Institute of Creative and 
Performing Arts, Adelphi University, 
Garden City, N. Y., was twice repre- 
sented at the New York World Fair. A 
bronze sculpture of White's was shown 
in the art exhibit, "Long Island Art To- 
day," which was first shown in the Pa- 
vilion of Fine Arts at the fair, with a 
second showing at Adelphi University. 
White was also commissioned to execute 
a relief sculpture for General Cigar 
Company which is now displayed on the 
exterior of the White Owl Cigar Pavi- 
lion at the fair. White, a 1955 graduate 
of the University of Maryland, obtained 
the M.A. degree the following year from 
Columbia University. Before coming to 
SIU in 1962, he had taught at Adelphi 
University, Long Island, and in the 
Garden City (N. Y.) public schools. 

W. Ronald Galloway, A&S '56, has 
recently been promoted to Supervising 
Underwriter in the Baltimore Service 
Office of Insurance by North America. 
He joined INA as a Student Underwriter 
in 1957. 

Captain Robert E. Grutzik, A&S 
'56, has arrived for duty with a Military 
Air Transport Service (MATS) unit at 
Scott A.F.B., 111. Captain Grutzik, a 
navigator, previously served at McGuire 
A.F.B., N. J. His new unit supports the 
MATS mission of providing global air- 
lift of U. S. military forces and equip- 
ment. He is a member of Theta Chi. 

Abdolah Hendifar, A&S '56, has 
been named instructor in chemistry at 
Temple University's Ambler Campus. 
He holds a B.A. degree from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and a M.S. degree 
from Drexel Institute of Technology. 
Hendifar is currently working on his 
Doctor of Philosophy degree at Bryn 
Mawr College. He taught at Drexel for 
two years before coming to Temple to 
teach. He makes his home at 155 
Lowrys Lane, Rosemont, Pa. 

Lt. Col. Mark W. Magnan, Mil. 
Sci. '56, of St. Petersburg, Fla., succeeds 
Col. Jean K. Woodyard of Newark, 
Ohio, as senior Air Force representative 
to the Infantry School July 27. Col. 
Woodyard has been assigned as air 
liaison officer for the 2nd Air Division 
in South Viet-Nam. Duties of the Air 
Force representative at Fort Benning in- 
clude advising the Infantry School on Air 
Force matters. He also conducts classes 
pertaining to Air Force doctrine, capa- 
bilities and operations. During World 
War II, he flew B-17's in London and 
in the Pacific Theatre. His other overseas 
duty includes a tour at Whitehorse. 
Yukon Territory, from 1947 to 1949; 
Goosebay, Labrador, 1953 to 1955 and 
with the United Nation Command in 
Korea, 1959-1960. The colonel received 



22 



the Maryland Magazine 




a B.S. degree from the University of 
Maryland and a M.A. from George 
Washington University. Among his dec- 
orations and awards are the Distin- 
guished Flying Cross, Air Medal with 
four Oak Leaf Clusters, and the Army 
and Air Force Commendation Medal. 

Ai.i.en A. Meyer, Jr., ll.b. '56, has 
joined National Distillers and Chemical 
Corporation as chief patent counsel. Mr. 
Meyer comes to National from the 
patent department 
of International 
Business Ma- 
chines Corpora- 
tion. Previously 
he had been asso- 
ciated with two 
patent law firms 
^^vv- a and with a phar- 

gtt^ \ « ^k maceutical com- 

I M M pany patent 

work. He holds a 
degree from the University of Maryland 
Law School and a degree in chemistry 
from Northwestern University. Mr. 
Meyer is a member of the Association 
of the Bar of the City of New York, 
the International Patent, Trademark and 
Copyright Association, the American 
Patent Law Association, the New York 
Patent Law Association, and the Amer- 
ican Bar Association. Mr. Meyer lives 
in Chappaqua, N. Y., with his wife and 
four children. 

Captain Stanley J. Polyanski, BPA 
'56, has graduated from the Air Force 
Institute of Technology's School of Sys- 
tems and Logistics at Wright-Patterson 
A.F.B., Ohio. Captain Polyanski, who 
received his M.S. degree in logistics 
management, is remaining at Wright- 
Patterson for assignment to Headquar- 
ters, Air Force Logistics Command 
(AFLC). His new headquarters directs 
the AFLC mission of providing Air 
Force operational units with supplies, 
equipment and maintenance services. 
The captain received his commission in 
1956 upon completion of the Reserve 
Officer Training Corps program. He is 
a member of Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Dr. Carl L. Heifetz, Pharm. '57, 
m.a. '60, ph.d. '64, recently joined 
Parke, Davis & Company as an 
associate research bacteriologist. A 
former resident of Baltimore, Md., 
Dr. Heifetz holds B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. 
degrees from the University of Mary- 
land. He is a member of the American 
Society for Microbiology. Prior to join- 
ing Parke-Davis he was employed in 
retail pharmacy, and by the University 
of Maryland Pharmacy and Dental 
Schools. 

David G. Kissinger, ph.d. '57, of 
Atlantic Union College, South Lancas- 
ter, Mass., has just published a book 
entitled The Curculionidae of America 
North of Mexico. This book is a key 
for the identification of the various 
groups of weevils. It is estimated 
that there are 35,000 species of weevils. 



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23 



Dr. Kissinger received his Ph.D. at the 
University of Maryland. 

Colonel Elmer C. Laedtke, UC 
'57. graduated June 5 from the Air War 
College, the U. S. Air Force's senior 
professional school, at the Air Univer- 
sity. Maxwell A.F.B., Ala. Colonel 
Laedtke is being reassigned to Head- 
quarters, Air Force Communications 
Service at Scott A.F.B., 111., for duty 
as a staff officer. He also completed 
partial requirements for a M.A. degree 
in international affairs at the Air Uni- 
versity extension center of George 
Washington University while attending 
the Air War College. 

CWO Royal Yates, UC '57, is a 
member of the U. S. Air Force Tactical 
Air Command (TAC) forces now tak- 
ing part in Exercise Indian River being 
conducted at the Tactical Air Warfare 
Center, Eglin A.F.B., Fla. The exercise 
involves a series of special joint air- 
ground operations to test concepts of 
tactical air mobility and firepower for 
battlefield support of ground troops. 
TAC fighter, reconnaissance and troop 
carrier aircraft are being used. Mr. 
Yates is an administrative officer. He 
was selected for assignment to the 
Tactical Air Warfare Center to assist 
in staging the exercise which contin- 
ued into early September. The 24-year 
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KOESTER'S 
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lege and received his B.S. degree in mili- 
tary science from the University of 
Maryland. 

Joseph E. Baden, BPA '58, a native 
of Brandywine, Md., is a financial ana- 
lyst on the Project Staff for the Nimbus 
Weather Satellite recently launched 
from the Pacific Missile Range in Cali- 
fornia by the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration's Goddard Space 
Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. It was 
his responsibility to help plan and con- 
trol the Nimbus Project budget by mak- 
ing pricing and cost analysis. Prior to 
joining Goddard in October 1963, Baden 
worked for the Litton Industries. He 
resides in Hyattsville, Md. with his wife 
and three children. 

Captain Ronald K. Hunt, BPA '58, 
has arrived for duty with a unit of the 
U. S. Air Forces in Europe (USAFE) 
at Bentwaters R.A.F. Station, England. 
Captain Hunt, a pilot, previously served 
at Laredo A.F.B., Tex. His new unit 
supports the USAFE mission of provid- 
ing the major air contribution for de- 
fense of the NATO countries. The cap- 
tain is a member of Delta Tau Delta. 

Lt. Col. Francis P. Sanna, UC '58, 
received the first oak leaf cluster to the 
U. S. Air Force Commendation Medal 
at Ramstein A.B., Germany. Colonel 
Sanna was awarded the medal for meri- 
torious service as chief of the war plans 
branch, Seventeenth Air Force Logistics 
Command (AFLC) at Wright-Patter- 
son A.F.B., Ohio, as a logistics officer. 
AFLC provides Air Force operational 
units with supplies, equipment and main- 
tenance services. The colonel, a gradu- 
ate of New Canaan High School, earned 
his B.S. degree from the University of 
Maryland. He received his commission 
in 1942 upon completion of Officer 
Candidate School. 

Major Donald B. Wren, b.s., Mil. 
Sci. '58, has arrived for duty with a 
unit of the Headquarters Command 
(HQCOMD) at Boiling A.F.B., Wash- 
ington. D. C. Major Wren, a personnel 
staff officer, previously served at Norton 
A.F.B., Calif. HQCOMD provides logis- 
tical and administrative support to 
USAF Headquarters. The major, a 
graduate of Concordia (Kan.) High 
School, received his B.S. degree from 
the University of Maryland. He received 
his commission through the aviation 
cadet program. 

V. Allen Bandel, Agr. '59 and 
m. agr. '62, has been appointed assistant 
professor in the Agronomy Department 
at the University of Maryland. Mr. 
Bandel will do extension work in soils 
and will conduct research in the area of 
soil fertility. He will also be in charge 
of the state-wide testing laboratory at 
College Park. Mr. Bandel is a native of 
Maryland was reared on a dairy farm 
in Howard County. He graduated with 
honors from the College of Agriculture 
and for his outstanding work in Agron- 
omy he was the recipient of the Ameri- 



can Society of Agronomy Student 
Award. In 1962 he received the Soil 
Science Society of America Blue Ribbon 
Award for excellence of presentation of 
a research paper entitled "The Effects 
of Potassium on Root Anatomy of Al- 
falfa in Relation to Winter Hardiness." 
In addition to his research work on 
winter hardiness in alfalfa. Mr. Bandel 
has conducted research on the nutrient 
requirements of orchardgrass. He is a 
member of Sigma Xi, Alpha Zeta, The 
American Society of Agronomy and the 
Soil Science Society of America. 

T/S Leon E. Farrell, CSCS '59, 
has been decorated with the U. S. Air 
Force Commendation Medal during his 
retirement ceremonies at Boiling A.F.B., 
Washington, D. C. Sergeant Farrell was 
awarded the medal for meritorious ser- 
vice as an education supervisor with a 
Headquarters Command unit at Boiling 
prior to his retirement. The sergeant, 
who has more than 20 years of service, 
is a veteran of both World War II and 
the Korean conflict. A graduate of East 
Corinth (Maine) Academy, Sergeant 
Farrell received his B.S. degree in mili- 
tary affairs from the University of 
Maryland. 

Captain Wallace W. Elwood, UC 
'59, was decorated with the U. S. Air 
Force Commendation Medal at Hollo- 
man, N. M., upon his retirement after 
more than 24 years of service. Captain 
Elwood, who also received the accom- 
panying certificate to the medal and his 
retirement certificate at the ceremony, 
was awarded the medal for his meritori- 
ous service. He was commander of the 
Headquarters Squadron, 366th Tactical 
Fighter Wing, at Holloman, prior to his 
retirement. He is a veteran of World 
War II and the Korean conflict. The 
captain was commissioned in 1951 by 
direct appointment. A graduate of 
Downsville (N. Y.) High School, he 
attended the University of Maryland 
and Blackstone School of Law, Chicago. 
Captain Elwood holds B.S. and LL.B. 
degrees. He and his family plan to make 
their home at El Paso, Tex. 

Dr. Richard G. Holroyd, b.a. '58, 
m.a. '59, has been appointed to the staff 
of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., 
as a consulting clinical psychologist. Dr. 
Holroyd completed a residency at the 
Mayo Graduate School of Medicine, 
University of Minnesota at Rochester. 
Since October, 1963, Dr. Holroyd has 
been an assistant to the staff in clinical 
psychology. 

Lt. Col. Henry E. LeFebvre, UC 
'59, graduated June 5 from the Air War 
College, the U. S. Air Force's senior 
professional school, at the Air Univer- 
sity, Maxwell A.F.B., Ala. Colonel 
LeFebvre is being reassigned to the U. S. 
Southern Command in Panama as a 
staff officer. He also completed require- 
ments for an M.A. degree in interna- 
tional affairs at the Air University exten- 
sion center of George Washington Uni- 



24 



the Maryland Magazine 



versity while attending the Air War 
College. 

Lt. Col. Lewis V. Posich, CSCS 
'59, U. S. Army, has joined the faculty 
staff of Bordentown Military Institute 
and will serve as the professor of Mili- 
tary Science. 

Colonel Donald C. Wilson, UC 
'59, has retired from the U. S. Army. 
During his 23 years' service, Colonel 
Wilson served in the Chinese Combat 
Command during World War II. He 
was Director of Economics, Military 
Governor of the Ryukyus; on the staff, 
Office of the Secretary of Defense; 
Senior Army Advisor, 20th Republic of 
Korea Division; Senior Army Advisor 
to Maryland National Guard; President, 
Sixth U. S. Army Physical Evaluation 
Board; and Assistant Deputy Chief of 
Staff, Operations and Training, Head- 
quarters, Sixth U. S. Army. During his 
career, Col. Wilson attended language 
schools for the Chinese and Spanish 
languages. His decorations include: 
Bronze Star Medal with two Oak Leaf 
Clusters; Army Commendation Medal 
with Oak Leaf Cluster; Special Breast 
Order of Yun Hui, Republic of China; 
the Chungmu Distinguished Military 
Service Medal, Republic of Korea; the 
Combat Infantry Badge, and various 
Theater and Service medals. Col. Wilson 
plans to reside in Maryland. 

Major Robert E. Rankin, CSCS 
'59, of Canton, Ohio, received a certifi- 
cate of appreciation for his outstanding 
service to the Republic of Korea Air 
Force (ROKAF) at Seoul. Presenting 
the citation was Lt. Gen. Won Suk 
Parks, ROKAF chief of staff. Major 
Rankin was honored for his outstanding 
professional knowledge and experience 
as a U. S. Air Force advisor in helping 
develop the organizational structure and 
manpower management of the ROKAF. 
The 22-year-service veteran is being re- 
assigned to Lackland A.F.B., Tex. 
There, as a member of the Air Training 
Command, he will be on the faculty of 
the Air Force Officer Training School. 

Captain David Scott, A&S '59. was 
married to Miss Mary Evelyn Charlton, 
daughter of Mrs. Evart Anthony Charl- 
ton, on Sept. 21, 1964, in Immanuel 
Presbyterian Church at Lake Oswego, 
Oregon. The bride was graduated from 
Occidental College where she was 
affiliated with Delta Omicron Tau. 



THE SIXTIES 

Captain Michael W. Balok, UC 
'60, graduated June 12 from the U. S. 
Air Force Command and Staff College 
at the Air University, Maxwell A.F.B., 
Ala. Captain Balok was one of more 
than 500 graduates who marked the 
end of more than nine months of pro- 
fessional military education for career 
Air Force captains and majors. 

Martin J. Bohn, Jr., A&S '60, who 



will be senior c lini i al I ni 

versity Counseling Service .is well .is an 
assistant professoi ol psycho 
ceived Ins Ph.D. degree from Si 
versity of Iowa tins year, Inn \l \ from 
SIU in 1963. 

Lt. Coi . Wii son \i Di Prii si i i 
'60, formerly oi Salem, Mo . ha 

sinned command ol the 728th I actical 
Control Squadron at Shaw A.F.B., S ( 

Colonel DePriesl served al I lizondo Ail 
Station, Spam, prior to Ins appointment 

at Shaw. His new unit supports the l>. 
tical Air Command mission ol providing 
firepower and other air support to I S 
Army forces. Colonel DePriest, who has 
26 years of military duty, served in the 
European Theater of Operations during 
World War II. 

Anthony P. DeThomas, Engr. '60 
at the University of Maryland, recently 
received his M.S. from Ohio State Uni- 
versity. 

Lt. Col. Amin George, Jr., UC '60, 
graduated from the Air War College, the 



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transportation systems and prepared the 
Chamber annual "Transportation Re- 
view and Outlook." Horn joined the 
staff of the Peerless Transportation Co., 
Dayton, Ohio, in 1958. From March, 
1960, through January, 1963, he was a 
transportation analyst with the Trans- 
portation Association of America, 
Washington, D. C. In February, 1963, 
he joined the U. S. Chamber of Com- 
merce. A native of Dayton, Ohio, and 
a graduate of the University of Tennes- 
see, he obtained his Master of Business 
Administration degree from the Univer- 
sity of Maryland in 1959. Horn lives in 
Alexandria, Va. 

1st Lt. Theodore F. Kyte, Jr., 
Educ. '60, has returned with his Tactical 
Air Command (TAC) unit to Cannon 
A.F.B., N. M., following a temporary 
duty tour at Misawa A.B., Japan. Lt. 
Kyte is a pilot. TAC units, which 
provide firepower and other air support 
for U. S. Army forces, are rotated fre- 
quently to overseas bases to maintain a 
high degree of flexibility and combat 
readiness. 

Captain Gene J. Stergar, m. educ. 
'60, has been presented the Air Force 
Systems Command (AFSC) Certificate 
of Merit. The captain was honored for 
his distinguished service as a research 
procurement management staff officer at 
the headquarters of AFSC's Research 
and Technology Division at Boiling 
A.F.B., Washington, D. C. The certifi- 
cate, signed by General B. A. Schriever, 
AFSC commander, was presented by 
Maj. Gen. Marvin C. Demler, at a 
special ceremony at Boiling. Captain 
Stergar received his Bachelor of Science 
degree from Montana State College and 
was commissioned there upon comple- 
tion of the Air Force Reserve Officer 
Training Corps program. He earned his 
master's degree in Education from the 
University of Maryland. 

1st Lt. John R. Thomas, Engr. '60, 
has completed the rigorous U. S. Air 
Force Survival and Special Training 
School at Stead A.F.B., Nev. Lt. 
Thomas, a pilot, was trained to use 
equipment and techniques that would 
enable him to survive under adverse 
climatic conditions and hostile environ- 
ments. The course, conducted by the Air 
Training Command, includes combat 
survival, evasion and escape and coun- 
terinsurgency training. He was com- 
missioned in 1960 upon completion of 
the Reserve Officer Training Corps pro- 
gram at the University of Maryland, 
College Park. 

William S. West, ll.b. '60, has 
RCA Nimbus Project Office responsibil- 
ity for technical and administration di- 
rection of the Power Supply Subsystem. 
Mr. West has had 13 years of engineer- 
ing, supervisory, and administration ex- 
perience in radar, aircraft, missile, and 
satellite development. At the Western 
Electric Company he received intensive 
industrial engineering training. At the 



Martin-Marietta Company, Mr. West 
participated in numerous assignments. 
He was a group engineer on the B-57 
and Bullpup missile projects, responsible 
for the electric system design. He was 
also the representative for the electron- 
ics department controlling various 
groups working on the Titan ICBM 
thrust simulators, test procedures, con- 
trol panels and television monitoring 
systems. Mr. West has written articles 
on missile reliability and nuclear system 
range considerations. He joined RCA in 
1962 as Supervisor of the New Castle 
power skill center. In his present capac- 
ity, Mr. West is assigned to the Nimbus 
Project Office and is responsible for the 
technical direction of the Nimbus Space- 
craft Power Supply Subsystem. 

Lt. Col. Richard J. Gibney, UC 
'61, graduated Friday, June 5, from the 
Air War College, the U. S. Air Force's 
senior professional school, at the Air 
University, Maxwell A.F.B., Ala. Col- 
onel Gibney is being reassigned to Pope 
A.F.B., N. C, for duty as a squadron 
commander. He also completed require- 
ments for a M.A. degree in international 
affairs at the Air University extension 
center of George Washington University 
while attending the Air War College. 

Colonel Robert T. Hof, UC '61, 
has entered the Industrial College of the 
Armed Forces at Fort Lesley J. McNair 
in Washington, D. C. Colonel Hof is 
one of 180 selected senior military offi- 
cers and key government officials who 
will undergo 10 months of intensive 
education in the management of stra- 
tegic logistic resources for national se- 
curity. Operating under the direct super- 
vision of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the 
Industrial College is one of the nation's 
highest military educational institutions. 

Lt. Col. Gordon E. Mulvey, UC 
'61, graduated June 5 from the Air 
War College, the U. S. Air Force's senior 
professional school, at the Air Univer- 
sity, Maxwell A.F.B., Ala. Colonel Mul- 
vey is being reassigned to Headquarters, 
Oklahoma City Air Materiel Area at 
Tinker A.F.B., Okla., for duty as a staff 
officer. He also completed requirements 
for a M.A. degree in international af- 
fairs at the Air University extension 
center of George Washington Univer- 
sity while attending the Air War College. 
The colonel, a graduate of Dean Acad- 
emy, Franklin, Mass., received his B.S. 
degree at the University of Maryland. 
He is a member of Alpha Tau Omega. 

Major Wayne Musgrove, UC '61, 
has been awarded the U. S. Air Force 
Air Medal for meritorious achievement 
during aerial flights in support of the 
fight against communist aggression in 
Viet Nam. Major Musgrove, a tactical 
air detachment commander, is on duty 
with a unit of the Pacific Air Forces, 
the command that provides airpower for 
defense of the U. S. and its allies in the 
Pacific and Far East areas. He flies with 
Vietnamese Air Force crews to assist 









26 



the Maryland Magazine 



and advise them on combat tactics 
against the Viet Cong. The 22-year- 
service veteran, commissioned in Janu- 
ary 1944, through the aviation cadet 
program, served in the European Thea- 
ter of Operations during World War II. 
He is also a veteran of the Korean 
conflict. 

Colonel Paul F. Patch, UC '61. 
graduated June 5 from the Air War 
College, the U. S. Air Force's senior 
professional school, at the Air Univer- 
sity, Maxwell A.F.B., Ala. Colonel 
Patch is being reassigned to Headquar- 
ters, Pacific Air Forces at Hickam 
A.F.B., Hawaii, as director of transpor- 
tation. He also completed requirements 
for an M.A. degree in international af- 
fairs at the Air University extension 
center of George Washington Univer- 
sity while attending the Air War Col- 
lege. The colonel attended the Univer- 
sity of Denver, and received his B.A. 
degree from the University of Maryland. 
Joseph J. Pear, A&S '61, recently 
received his M.S. from Ohio State 
University. 

Lt. Col. Kenneth L. Vaughan, UC 
'61, received the U. S. Air Force Com- 
mendation Medal at Scott A.F.B., III. 
Colonel Vaughn was awarded the medal 
for meritorious service while assigned 
to the Directorate of Operations at 
Headquarters, U. S. Air Force. He is 
now chief of command control auto- 
mation division at Headquarters, Mili- 
tary Air Transport Service (MATS) at 
Scott. MATS provides global airlift of 
U. S. military forces and equipment. He 
entered the service in June 1941 and 
received his commission in 1943 through 
the aviation cadet program. Colonel 
Vaughn is a veteran of the Korean con- 
flict and during World War II served 
in the European Theater of Operations. 
1st Lt. George J. Belejchak, Jr., 
A&S '62, has completed the rigorous 
U. S. Air Force Survival and Special 
Training School at Stead A.F.B., Nev. 
Lt. Belejchak, an electronics warfare 
officer, was trained to use equipment 
and techniques that would enable him 
to survive under adverse climatic condi- 
tions and hostile environments. The 
course, conducted by the Air Training 
Command, includes combat survival, 
evasion and escape, and counterinsurg- 
ency training. The lieutenant is being 
reassigned to a Strategic Air Command 
(SAC) unit at Wright-Patterson A.F.B., 
Ohio. He received his commission in 
1962 upon graduation from the Officer 
Training School. 

Claudia Ann Brush, UC '62, re- 
ceived a M.S. degree in Clothing and 
Textiles from Pennsylvania State Uni- 
versity. 

Fredric H. Burman, A&S '62, has 
been commissioned a second lieutenant 
in the U. S. Air Force upon graduation 
from Officer Training School (OTS) at 
Lackland A.F.B., Tex. Lieutenant Bur- 
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27 



tive examination, is being assigned to a 
unit of the U. S. Air Forces in Europe 
(USAFE) for duty in Turkey. USAFE 
provides the major air contribution for 
defense of the NATO countries. The 
lieutenant is a member of Zeta Beta Tau 
and Phi Alpha Theta. He also attended 
the University of North Carolina and 
Now York University. 

Robert J. Chinnis, ph.d., Doctor of 
Education, '62, has joined the American 
University faculty as an assistant pro- 
fessor of education in the College of 
Arts and Sciences. The new AU pro- 
fessor is a former lecturer on education 
and coordinator of undergraduate ele- 
mentary education at the University of 
Pennsylvania's Graduate School of Edu- 
cation. Before his teaching post at the 
University of Pennsylvania, Chinnis was 
a part-time instructor in education at 
the University of Virginia from 1957 
to 1960 and a visiting professor of edu- 
cation at Atlantic Christian College in 
Wilson, N. C, in 1962. Prior to teaching 
at the college level, Chinnis was the 
principal and a teacher at Trenton Ele- 
mentary School in Trenton, N. C, and 
also taught at Fayetteville (N. C.) 
Senior High School. He holds a B.S. 
degree in science and English from East 
Carolina College in Greenville, N. C, 
M.Ed, degree in public school ad- 
ministration and history from the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, and his doc- 
toral degree in elementary education and 
humanities growth and development 
from the University of Maryland. 

Lt. Col. Eldon N. Colby, UC '62, 
has arrived for duty with a unit of the 
Pacific Air Forces (PACAF) at Hickam 
A.F.B., Hawaii. Colonel Colby previ- 
ously served at Maxwell A.F.B., Ala. 
His new unit supports the PACAF mis- 
sion of providing airpower for defense 
of the U. S. and its allies in the Pacific 
area. A graduate of J. C. Fremont High 
School, Los Angeles, he attended the 
University of Maryland and George 
Washington University, and holds B.S. 
and M.A. degrees. He was commis- 
sioned through the aviation cadet pro- 
gram in 1943. 

Walter Wendell Knicely, Agr. 
'62, received a M.S. degree in Horticul- 
ture from Pennsylvania State Univer- 
sity. 

Dr. (Captain) Aaron I. Linchuck, 
A&S '62, who recently was called to 
active duty, has completed the orienta- 
tion course for officers of the U. S. Air 
Force medical service at Gunter A.F.B., 
Ala. Captain Linchuck is being assigned 
to England A.F.B., La., where he will 
practice as a dentist and assist with 
medical service for personnel of the 
Tactical Air Command which provides 
firepower and other air support to U. S. 
Army forces. Doctor Linchuck received 
his B.A. degree from Maryland Univer- 
sity at College Park and his D.D.S. 
degree from Howard University Dental 
School at Washington, D. C. He is a 




member of Tau Epsilon Phi and Alpha 
Omega. 

Larry K. Loughman, BPA '62, has 
been appointed supervisor of Methods 
Engineering and Work Standards for 
Plant 8 and Plas- 
^■■^ tic Molding. 

0KP '^^ Loughman came 

■ to Packard Elec- 

\ j* ^» trie, Warren, 

Ohio, in July. 
1962, and has 
worked in Meth- 
ods Engineering 
and Work Stand- 
ards since that 
time. A graduate 
of the University of Maryland, he holds 
a B.S. degree in business administration. 
William B. Moriarity, II, BPA '62, 
has been promoted to sales representa- 
tive in the Washington office of Trans- 
World Airlines. Moriarity was promoted 
from the company's Washington reser- 
vations office. 

1st Lt. Patrick M. Tobin, Engr. '62, 
has arrived for duty with the U. S. Air 
Force hospital at Osan A.B., Korea. 
Lieutenant Tobin, a sanitary and indus- 
trial hygiene engineer, previously served 
at Randolph A.F.B., Tex. His new unit 
furnishes medical services in support of 
the Pacific Air Forces mission of pro- 
viding airpower for defense of the U. S. 
and its allies in the Pacific area. The 
lieutenant is a member of Alpha Tau 
Omega. 

2nd Lt. Eugene J. Cincotta, Engr. 
'63, and 2nd Lt. Algird P. Leonas, 
Engr. '63, have been awarded U. S. Air 
Force silver pilot wings upon gradua- 
tion from flying training school at 
Moody A.F.B., Ga. The two lieutenants 
are returning to their Maryland Air 
National Guard unit in Baltimore. 

2nd Lt. Roy R. Cunningham, A&S 
'63, has been awarded U. S. Air Force 
silver pilot wings upon graduation from 
flying training school at Laughlin 
A.F.B., Tex. Lieutenant Cunningham is 
being assigned to Castle A.F.B., Calif., 
for flying duty in a unit which supports 
the Strategic Air Command mission of 
keeping the nation's intercontinental 
missiles and jet bombers on constant 
alert. The lieutenant was commissioned 
in 1963 upon completion of the Reserve 
Officer Training Corps program. 

2nd Lt. Joel W. Green, Jr., Agr. 
'63, has been awarded his silver wings 
upon graduation from U. S. Air Force 
navigator training at James Connally 
A.F.B., Tex. Lieutenant Green is being 
assigned to Hunter A.F.B., Ga., for 
flying duty on the C-123 Globemaster 
as a navigator. His new unit is a com- 
ponent of the Military Air Transport 
Service which provides global airlift of 
U. S. military forces and equipment. 

Lt. Col. Harry G. Howton, UC 
'63, has completed the rigorous U. S. 
Air Force survival and special training 
course by the Air Training Command at 



Stead A.F.B., Nev. Lieutenant Howton 
received combat-type escape and eva- 
sion training to enable him to survive 
under adverse climatic conditions and 
hostile environments. The colonel is 
being assigned as commander of a unit 
at Saigon, Viet Nam, which supports 
the Pacific Air Forces mission of pro- 
viding airpower for defense of the U. S. 
and its allies in the Pacific area. Colonel 
Howton attended Virginia Military In- 
stitute and the University of Maryland. 
He received his commission by direct 
appointment in 1942. 

Steny H. Hoyer, BPA '63, was 
elected president of the Young Demo- 
cratic Clubs of Maryland at their annual 
convention held recently at the Wash- 
ington Motel in Gaithersburg, Md. Mr. 
Hoyer becomes the youngest president 
in Maryland Young Democratic history. 
At 25 he succeeds Joseph Tydings, A&S 
'51, ll.b. '53, newly elected to the 
United States Senate, to this distinction. 
Hoyer is also the first president of the 
state Y. D.'s to come from Prince 
George's County. A resident of District 
Heights, Hoyer is a graduate of Suitland 
High School. He graduated from the 
University with "High Honors" and was 
chosen that school's outstanding male 
graduate of 1963. He was also selected 
for the men's leadership and scholarship 
honorary, Omicron Delta Kappa, and 
served as president of that organization. 
In addition, he was tapped for member- 
ship in Pi Sigma Alpha, a national poli- 
tical science honorary. The new presi- 
dent, an assistant on the staff of Senator 
Daniel B. Brewster, is currently attend- 
ing the Georgetown University Law 
Center, where he is in his second year 
of study. 

2nd Lt. Wil- 
liam S. Koop- 
mann, BPA '63, 
has been award- 
ed U. S. Air 
Force silver pilot 
wings upon grad- 
uation from flying 
training at Moody 
A.F.B., Ga., for 
duty with a unit 
of the Air Train- 
ing Command. 
Lt. Col. Rio G. Lucas, UC '63, 
graduated June 5 from the Air War 
College, the U. S. Air Force's senior 
professional school, at the Air Univer- 
sity, Maxwell A.F.B., Ala. The univer- 
sity-level course provides senior officers 
a better understanding of the elements 
of national power and aerospace re- 
sources, preparing the graduates for 
higher level command and staff posi- 
tions. Colonel Lucas is being reassigned 
to Headquarters, Baltic Approaches, 
Karup Air Station, Denmark, as the 
staff civil engineer. He also completed 
requirements for an M.A. degree in 
international affairs at the Air Univer- 
sity extension center of George Wash- 




28 



the Maryland Magazine 



ington University while attending the 
Air War College. Colonel Lucas, who 
has a B.A. degree in commerce, attend- 
ed the University of Colorado, the Uni- 
versity of Denver, and the University of 
Maryland. 

Captain Thomas J. McEi hinney, 
Jr.. UC '63, has arrived for duty at 
Goodfellow A.F.B., Texas, after a tour 
of service in Turkey. Captain McElhin- 
ney, an intelligence officer, is a graduate 
of Mary Knoll High School, Ossining, 
N. Y. He was commissioned in L951 
upon his graduation from Officer Candi- 
date School. 

2nd Lt. Dana N. Nasuti, A&S '63, 
has arrived for duty at Dyess A.F.B., 
Tex., after a tour of service in Japan. 
Lieutenant Nasuti, an information offi- 
cer, is assigned to a Tactical Air Com- 
mand (TAC) unit at Dyess. His organ- 
ization supports the TAC mission of 
providing firepower and other air sup- 
port to U. S. Army forces. The lieuten- 
ant was commissioned upon completion 
of the Reserve Officer Training Corps 
program. He is a member of Phi Kappa 
Tau. 

George C. Offutt, Jr., Educ. '63, 
of College Park, has been awarded a 
N.A.S.A. Traineeship for graduate study 
in zoology. Mr. Offutt has been elected 
vice president of Phi Sigma, the Bio- 
logical Sciences National Honor Society, 
at Maryland for this year. His wife, the 
former Lynn Rades, Educ. '61, a for- 
mer teacher in Prince George's County, 
is currently working on a graduate pro- 
gram in elementary school guidance. 

2nd Lt. James E. Orlando, BPA 
'63, has arrived for duty with a Military 
Air Transport Service (MATS) unit at 
Charleston A.F.B., S. C. Lieutenant Or- 
lando, a transportation officer, previous- 
ly served at James Connally A.F.B., 
Tex. His new unit supports the MATS 
mission of providing global airlift of 
U. S. military forces and equipment. 

Maurice L. Shelton, A&S '63, has 
been commissioned a second lieutenant 
in the U. S. Air Force upon graduation 
from Officer Training School (OTS) at 
Lackland A.F.B., Tex. Lieutenant Shel- 
ton was selected for OTS through com- 
petitive examinations with other college 
graduates. The lieutenant received his 
B.S. degree in zoology. 

Dr. (Captain) Junius T. Soi iday, 
d.d.s. '63, who recently was called to 
active duty, has completed the orienta- 
tion course for officers of the U. S. Air 
Force medical service at Gunter A.F.B., 
Ala. Captain Soliday is being assigned to 
Andrews A.F.B., Md., where he will 
practice as a dentist and assist with med- 
ical service for personnel of the Head- 
quarters Command which provides lo- 
gistical and administrative support to 
USAF Headquarters. Doctor Soliday 
attended Fenn College in Cleveland, 
Ohio, and Elkins College in Elkins, 
W. Va., and is a graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 

November-December, 1964 




Howard W. \\ win i u \\s 63 has 
been commissioned a second lieutenant 
in the United States An I orce upon 
graduation from Office) I raining School 
He was reassigned to Lowrj \l H 
Colo., for training as a munitions off] 
cer. He was graduated from the course 
for U. S. Air Force weapons officers, 
Lieutenant Wampler, who was trained 
to direct repair and assembly ol nucleai 
weapons, is being assigned (o a Strati 
Air Command (SAC) unit at Carswell 
A.F.B., Tex. His squadron supports the 
SAC mission of keeping the nation's 
intercontinental missiles and jet bombers 
on constant alert. The lieutenant lias a 
degree in chemistry and is a member oi 
Alpha Chi Sigma. 

2nd Li. Lyi.e H. West, I ( '63, has 
been awarded U. S. Air Force silver 
pilot wings upon graduation from dying 
training school at 
g| |^ Reese A.F.B., 

A ^ Tex. Lieutenant 

Wj ^r West is being 

|fl ^PT signed to Ells- 

worth A.F.B.. 
S. D., for Hying 
duty in a unit 
which supports 
the Strategic Air 
Command mis- 
sion of keeping 
the nation's intercontinental missiles and 
jet bombers on constant alert. The lieu- 
tenant was commissioned through the 
Air Force Reserve Officer Training 
Corps program. He is a member of 
Delta Sigma Pi. 

Donald F. White, Jr., P. E. 
'63, has been commissioned a second 
lieutenant in the U. S. Air Force upon 
graduation from Officer Training School. 
Lieutenant White is being reassigned to 
James Connally A.F.B., Tex., for train- 
ing as a navigator. The lieutenant is a 
member of Phi Delta Theta. 

M/Sgt. Edward J. Zeman, Educ. 
'63, has retired from the U. S. Air Force 
at Boiling A.F.B., Washington, D. C, 
after more than 23 years of service. Ser- 
geant Zeman served as a trombonist with 
the U. S. Air Force Band at Boiling 
prior to his retirement. He is a veteran 
of World War II. 

George E. Albert, UC '64, has been 
commissioned a second lieutenant in the 
U. S. Air Force upon graduation from 
Officer Training SchooU OTS) at Lack- 
land A.F.B., Tex. Lieutenant Albert was 
selected for OTS through competitive 
examinations with other college gradu- 
ates. The lieutenant received his A. A. 
degree from Kilgore Junior College and 
his B.A. from the University of Mary- 
land. 

Michael P. Bercu, A&S '64, has 
been commissioned a second lieutenant 
in the U. S. Air Force upon graduation 
from Officer Training School (OTS) at 
Lackland A.F.B.. Tex. Lieutenant Bercu 
was selected for OTS through competi- 
tive examinations with other college 



graduates 

ID Ll I i>w Mm H li 

is a membei ol the i S. Air I 
I actical \u < ommand < I \< 
now taking part in I Indian K 

being conducted .it the radical 
w arfare < entei I glin \ I u I 
exercise involves a series <>i spe< 

;round opei ations to test co 
tactical air mobilit) and firepowei foi 
battlefield supporl ol ground tro 
I \( fightei reconnaissance and tr< 
cai i iei airci afl are being used I he I 
tenanl received his commission upon 

pletion ol the Resei ve ' Ifficei I rain- 
ing < 'orps program .>i the Univei I 

Mal\ land. 

Mr \m> Mrs, ( ii \xi i s \\ <..mi 
Vgric. '59 and \i s. '64, moved to Penn 
State i niversitj foi continued graduate 
work in Agricultural Economics this 
summei Mrs. ( oale, nee I i i i ■■ I 
Kirby, graduated in Home Economics 
in 1958. 

Si i phi n I. Frank, Ir BPA '64, has 

been commissioned a second lieutenant 
in the U. S. Air Force upon graduation 
from Officer Training School iOISi .it 
Lackland A.F.B., Tex. Lieutenant Frank 

was selected lor OTS through competi- 
tive examinations with other college 
graduates. He will now go to one ol the 
more than 250 Air Force installations 
world-wide where combat and support 
units are based for his first assignment 
as an officer. 

Dr. (Captain) Ira N. Goldbach, 

d.d.s. '64. has been assigned to Robins 
A.F.B., Ga., following his recent call to 
active duty in the U. S. Air Force. 
Doctor Goldbach will join the medical 
staff at Robins to practice as a dentist. 
His new unit furnishes medical services 
in support of the Air Force 1 Ogistics 
Command mission oi providing Air 
Force operational units with supplies, 
equipment and maintenance services. 
The doctor, a graduate oi Miami Beach 
(Fla.) High School, attended the Uni- 
versity of Miami. Fla., and the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. He is a member ol 
Alpha Omega. 

Geoffrey B. [rani, A&S '64. who 
received his Bachelor's Degree in 
Physics from the University oi Mary- 
land in l l '64. recently joined the stall 
of the Physics Department of the Uni- 
versity of California I awrenee Radia- 
tion Laboratory in Livermore, Calif. Mr. 
Irani is now living in I ivermore, Calif. 

Brian O'Nlii l . A&S '64. recentK 
accepted a position as General Geogra- 
pher with U. S. Geological Survey, 
Washington. D. C. 

2nd Li. Chari i s R. I'm ierson. A&S 
'64. has been awarded his silver wings 
upon graduation from U. S. Air I orce 
navigator training at James ConnalU 
A.F.B., Tex. Lieutenant Patterson is 
being assigned to an Air Training Com- 
mand ( ATC) unit at Mather V.F.B., 
Calif., for training and duty. I he lieu- 
tenant, a graduate iff WoodstOWH N I 

29 



High School, received his B.A. degree 
from the University of Maryland. 

Thomas J. Slaughter, BPA "64, re- 
cently accepted a position as Financial 
Management Intern with the Bureau of 
Yards and Docks. Department of the 
Navy, Arlington. Va. 

Charles N. Somers, ph.d. '64, Eng- 
lish, has been appointed to the position 
of assistant academic dean, at Lock 
Haven State College in Pennsylvania. 
Dr. Somers, who has been assistant di- 
rector of the University of Maryland's 
Baltimore division of University College 
for three years, will assist Dean Gerald 
R. Robinson in the administration of 
academic affairs at the Pennsylvania 
college. He will also hold the rank of 
associate professor of English and will 
teach courses in English that include his 
area of specialty, Eighteenth Century 
English literature. Formerly director of 
the news bureau at Towson State Col- 
lege, Dr. Somers taught at Towson, the 
General Motors Institute and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. He also taught 
English at two Korean high schools in 
Seoul. A native of New York State, Dr. 
Somers has a B.A. in journalism from 
Wayne State University. He also earned 
an M.A. from the University of Mich- 
igan and a Ph.D. from the University of 
Maryland, both in English. Dr. Somers 
is a member of Sigma Delta Chi, the 
professional journalism society; Alpha 
Sigma Lambda, professional honor fra- 
ternity for evening students; the Na- 
tional Council of Teachers of English, 
the Modern Language Association and 
the University of Michigan Club of 
Baltimore. 

Dr. (Captain) Albert H. Swain, 
A&S '60 and d.d.s. '64, who recently 
was called to active duty, has completed 
the orientation course for officers of the 
U. S. Air Force medical service at 
Gunter A.F.B., Ala. Captain Swain is 
being assigned to Wright-Patterson 
A.F.B., Ohio, where he will practice as 
a dentist and assist with medical service 
for personnel of the Air Force Logistics 
Command which provides Air Force 
operational units with supplies, equip- 
ment and maintenance services. The 
doctor, a member of Alpha Tau Omega, 
is a graduate of the University of Mary- 
land and Baltimore College of Dental 
Surgery. 

2nd Lt. Philip B. Velthuis, BPA 
'64, has graduated from the U. S. Air 
Force orientation course for Medical 
Service Corps officers at Gunter A.F.B., 
Ala. Lieutenant Velthuis, who was given 
familiarization training on Air Force 
administrative procedures and medical 
service objectives, is being assigned to 
the U. S. Air Forces in Europe's 
(USAFE) Spangdahlem A.B., Ger- 
many. His unit furnishes medical serv- 
ices in support of the USAFE mission 
of providing the major air contribution 
for defense of the NATO countries. He 
is a member of Delta Sigma Pi. 

30 



fa*] 



HOTEL ^CPPLY CO, 

EST - Purveyors of Fine ^27 

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Frozen Foods 
Food Specialties 

To Hotels. 

Institutions, Ships 

Clubs, Et«. 



LExington 9-7055 

Night Service VA 5-7145 

227 S. 

Hanover St. 



BALTIMORE. MD. 



PARK 
TRANSFER 
COMPANY 

Heavy Hauling 

WASHINGTON. D. C. 



AREA CODE 202 
832-6533 





BAYSHORE 


FOODS, INC 




GRAIN 

FEED 

SEED 


EASTON, MD. 
Phone TA 2-3000 









McLeod &l Romborg 

Stone Co., Inc. 

— •— 

CUT STONE 

— •— 
Bladensburg, Maryland 





Silver Hill Sand & Gravel Co. 
Silver Hill Concrete Co. 






Phone 

for 

CONCRETE 

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5-3000 


Producers and Distributors of 

WASHED SAND & GRAVEL 
TOP SOIL • ROAD GRAVEL 
READY-MIXED CONCRETE 


Phone 

for 

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5-3000 








WASHINGTON 21, D.C. 







the Maryland Magazine 



J 



University of Maryland 
Alumni Association 

Dear Friends of Gren's: 

I always thought Gren's happiest 
memories were associated with 
Maryland. 

The beautiful honors and atten- 
tions you gave him at the Home- 
comings were pure joy for him. 

Thank you so very much for 
sending your representative and also 
for the beautiful flowers. 

The children and 1 were so 
pleased. I hope he knows. 

Sincerely, 

RUTH I EWIS 



In Memoriam 

WHEN UWE-THORSTEN SCOBEL GRADU- 

ated from the University of Maryland 
in 1959, he wanted two things — United 
States citizenship, and a career as a 
pilot. 

But he was born in Germany, and 
because he did not enter the United 
States until 1955, the five-year waiting 
period would prevent him from becom- 
ing a citizen until 1960. The delay would 
prevent him from entering the U. S. 
Air Force Academy as he planned. 

He went to the office of Sen. J. Glenn 
Beall (R.-Md.) and told him of the 
problem. He was always interested in a 
military career and was a lieutenant 
colonel in the University's ROTC pro- 
gram. Beall, who said his meetings with 
Scobel "have convinced me that his un- 
questionable character as well as his sin- 
cere desire to become a citizen makes 
him a worthy beneficiary of this legis- 
lation," introduced a private bill grant- 
ing the citizenship. 

The bill was approved and Scobel 
entered the academy with the rest of his 
class. 

In December of 1963 Capt. Scobel 
flew an unarmed propeller aircraft out 
of Phan Thiet Airfield on a reconnais- 
sance mission in Viet Nam. The Viet 
Cong spotted the small plan and fired a 
stream of 50 caliber shells. Scobel was 
wounded in the left arm, but he made 
four more passes over the enemy to lead 
a Vietnamese Air Force B-26 to the 
target. 

He returned to his airfield for fuel 
and then took off again for action with- 
out waiting for his wounds to be treated. 
The action won him the Distinguished 
Flying Cross. 

Last March he was flying an unarmed 
TO- ID three miles inside Viet Nam 
when a Cambodian T-28 shot him down. 
Badly wounded, he was rescued by U. S. 
helicopters, but he died six days later 
in a hospital at Clark Air Force Base 
in the Philippines. He received seven 
posthumous decorations. 



When Senator Beall learned ol ( apt. 

Scobel's death, he wrote a lettei ol con 
dolence to his parents. "] think it can 
be truly said thai he was a greal service 
to our Country. He was in ever) mannei 
the epitome ol the all-American boj " 

Creston E. Funk, Engr. '31, chiel ol 

the contract document section ol the 
District Department of Highways and 
Traffic, died alter a heart attack. Mi 
Funk had been associated with the 
highway department since 1959. 

He had been employed as a civil 
engineer by the city of Hagcrstown, the 
Pennsylvania Department ol Highways 
and the Truscon Steel Co. and. before 
coming to the District, was employed 
for 18 years by the J. E. Geiner Co. ol 
Baltimore, a consulting engineers firm. 

Mr. Funk worked on construction ol 
Friendship International Airport, the 
Ohio Turnpike and the Chesapeake Bay 
Bridge. 

Carr T. Van Sickler, A&S '23, a Wash- 
ington orchestra leader and composer, 
died of cancer at Providence Hospital. 
Born in the District, Mr. Van Sickler 
was leader of the band at the Madrillon 
Restaurant for 1 3 years. While attend- 
ing the University of Maryland, he or- 
ganized the Old Liners Band, which 
entertained at school functions and 
accompanied the university glee club. 
Van Sickler also write "Terrapins on 
Parade," one of the songs included in 
the University Song Book. 

John S. Mahle, Sr., L.L.B. '15, Balti- 
more lawyer, former Woodlawn magis- 
trate and Delegate from Baltimore 
County, has died. 

Admitted to the Maryland State Bar 
50 years ago, Mr. Mahle was still prac- 
ticing shortly before his death. He and 
his son, John S .Mahle, Jr., have offices 
in the Tower Building, Baltimore. 

Mr. Mahle served as a member of 
the Maryland House of Delegates from 
1922 until 1930, representing Baltimore 
County. He was police court magistrate 
at Woodlawn from 1940 until 1950. A 
specialist in real estate law, Mr. Mahle 
was a charter member of the Baltimore 
County Bar Association, and had lived 
for some 60 years in the Woodlawn 
area. 

Melvin E. Koons, A&S '30, died on 
Oct. 4, 1964, in Grand Forks, North 
Dakota. 

Joyce Amrin Staubus, H.Ec. '51, wife 
of Paul C. Staubus, road engineer for 
the Department of Public Works of 
Prince Georges County, died of cancer 
at her home in Forestville. 

A native of Lansing, Mich., Mrs. 
Staubus came to Washington in 1939, 
and graduated from Eastern High 
School. She received a bachelor's degree 
in home economics from the University 
of Maryland in 1951 and for the next 
five years was employed as a dietitian 
at Glendale Sanitarium. 



She u.is .. membci of 1 M th- 

odist ( burch, where she was -In. 

ol the Junior ( hoii I 

and Alpha \i Delta Soroi I B 

No \ Fob i I >au jhu i v *tia. 

Col. I rank \i Moosi , m.d 
who organized the \rmy's tnst medical 
training battalion, died aftei a h 
attack .it Waltei Reed Hospital. 
( ui \ioose retired from the Vrmj in 

I'M.N alter moie than I 

\ native ol Mount Pleasanl North 
( arolina, be received his bach« 
gree from Southwestern I ty in 

lex.is and his M I ) from the 

University ol Maryland in 1914 He 

also held a doctorate in medicine troni 

the i Iniversit) ol Maryland 
( oi Moose entered the Am, . as a 

first lieutenant in 1917. During World 
War I he served as a battalion surgeon 

with the '-1st Infantry, 5th Division 

He was awarded the Silver Star foi 
bravery during action in 1918 and also 
received the Purple Heart 

During his Army career ( ol. Moose 
served two tours of duty on the surgical 
staff of Walter Reed Hospital 

When World War II broke out, he 
was serving at (amp Lee, Virginia, and 
there organized the Army's lirst medical 
training battalion. 

Col. Moose also assisted in plans lor 
the Medical Replacement Training (en- 
ter and for his work on both projects 
received the Army Commendation 
Medal for outstanding service. 

George J. Mu i in. Ju.. t .t u. '52. build- 
er, financier, attorney, accountant and 
engineer, died following a lengths ill- 
ness. 

Mr. Miller was President oi George 
J. Miller, Jr., Builder. Inc.. and of the 
Baltimore Business Investment Com- 
pany, the first such concern licensed in 
Maryland under the Small Business In- 
vestment Company Act of 1 1 >5S. 

He was a partner in the law firm ol 
O'Conor and Sweeney and a partner in 
the certified public accounting firm oi 
Bloom and Miller. 

He was a director of Baltimore Con- 
tractors, Inc.. and an officer or director 
of more than 20 small business concerns. 

He was a member of the Alpha Sigma 
Nu, Jesuit Honor Society, and the presi- 
dent of the Alpha Sigma Nu Alumni 
Club of Baltimore. Mr. Miller served 
two terms as treasurer of the National 
Association of Small Business Invest- 
ment Companies. 

As a college student Mr. Miller pro- 
claimed that a financial career could be 
built without sacrifice of personal stand- 
ards. In a program to give a practical 
base to his education, he worked suc- 
cessively as an engineer, private and 
public accountant and lawyer. By 1950 
he had already determined on an ulti- 
mate goal of handling investment 
capital. 



November-December, 1964 



31 



In the field of home and apartment 
construction he was an immediate suc- 
cess, achieving a reputation for the 
thoughtful design of his structures. 

Dr. Mn ton S. Sacks, A&S "32 and 
M.I). '34. Professor of Clinical Medi- 
cine and Head of the Division of Clin- 
ical Pathology at the University of 
Maryland Medical School, died at the 
age of 54. 

Native of Baltimore, he was an early 
researcher in Rh blood factor problems. 
His works in the field of hematology — 
the study of blood and its diseases, 
gained him widespread recognition. In 
addition to writing numerous papers 
dealing with various aspects of hematol- 
ogy, he wrote a chapter for one of the 
standard textbooks on Rh complications 
of pregnancy. 

His works as a hematologist also 
brought him into research concerning 
leukemia. 

In this area he was consulted in the 
case of Miss Ann O'Neill, of the 1200 
block of Dorchester Road, whose recov- 
ery from the ailment figured in the 
beatification of Maryland's Venerable 
Mother Seton in March, 1963. 

Dr. Sacks was also a member of the 
medical advisory committee of the Bal- 
timore Red Cross blood program and a 
diplomat of the American Board of In- 
ternal Medicine and the American Board 
of Pathology. 

He also belonged to Alpha Omega 
Alpha honorary medical fraternity, the 
Medical and Chirurgical Faculty of 
Maryland, the American Medical Assn., 
and the American Society of Hematol- 
ogy. He was a fellow of the American 
College of Physicians. 

In 1936, with an appointment as In- 
structor in pathology at the University's 
Medical School, he launched a teaching 
career that, colleagues recall, was to 
demonstrate his uncanny ability to make 
complexities of hematology simple 
enough for novice physicians to com- 
prehend thoroughly. 

He was Hitchcock Fellow in medicine 
for two years beginning in 1938 and for 
the ensuing two years was associate in 
medicine at the University of Maryland. 

He later became Assistant Professor 
of Medicine and Head of the Division 
of Clinical Pathology at University 
Hospital. 

Between 1947 and 1954 he was Asso- 
ciate Professor of Medicine, Head of 
the Division of Clinical Pathology and 
Director of the Hospital's clinical labo- 
ratories. 

Dr. Sacks was Director of the Balti- 
more Rh Typing Laboratory, which was 
founded in 1945 largely through his 
efforts. 

Harry J. Green, l.l.b. '21, the Balti- 
more attorney who made "Green Com- 
mission" a Maryland byword because 
of the number of important government 



finance advisory commissions he headed, 
died at the age of 58. 

Mr. Green was stricken with a heart 
attack while attending the Colt-Green 
Bay Packers football game here. He died 
shortly after at Union Memorial Hospi- 
tal. 

A prominent lawyer and senior part- 
ner of the Baltimore law firm of Wein- 
berg & Green, Mr. Green was best 
known in Maryland as an unpaid finan- 
cial adviser for both Republican and 
Democratic State administrations, and 
most recently for Mayor McKeldin. 

As Governor of Maryland, Mr. 
McKeldin had twice named the schol- 
arly lawyer to head important State 
commissions. 

A bright youth, who could read before 
he attended school, Mr. Green first dis- 
tinguished himself as Baltimore's young- 
est doctor of philosophy, winning the 
degree in political science from Johns 
Hopkins University at the age of 23. 
He shares the Hopkins age mark with 
former Senator George L. Radcliffe, 
who also was a Ph.D. at 23. 

Mr. Green had won his bachelor's 
degree from the Hopkins at 20, while 
simultaneously attending the University 
of Maryland Law School at night, where 
he received his L.L.B. at 21. 

In addition to this frenzy of scholarly 
activity, he held down various paying 
jobs at the same time to finance summer 
courses at the Sorbonne in Paris and 
Heidelberg in Germany. 

His doctoral dissertation on the Mary- 
land Legislature became a published 
handbook that was used long after by 
novice members of the General Assem- 
bly. 

After graduation from the Hopkins, 
he worked for the Maryland Department 
of Legislative Reference and then from 
1931 to 1935 as an assistant attorney 
general assigned to cases before the 
State Industrial Accident Commission. 

He resigned the State appointive post 
in 1935 to devote full time to the private 
practice of law in the firm of Weinberg 
& Sweeten. 

Specializing in corporate finance and 
taxation, he represented a number of 
major clients and became a member of 
many corporate boards during his 
career. 

In addition to his public and profes- 
sional activities, he devoted many years 
to the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation, 
and was a director of the congregation 
at the time of his death. 

He was a great sports enthusiast, en- 
joying fishing as well as football and 
other spectator sports in recent years. 

Lt. Gen. Robert N. Young, A&S '22, 
a native Washinetonian who directed 
the victorious assault on Korea's Heart- 
break Ridge and who was a former 
commander of the Military District of 
Washington, died recently at his home 
in Asheville, North Carolina. He was 




64 and had been ill for several months. 
After graduat- 
ing from McKin- 
ley Tech High 
School in Wash- 
ington, D. C, in 
1918, Gen. Young 
enlisted as a pri- 
vate in the army 
and saw active 
action overseas. 
After the war he 
enrolled at the 
University of Maryland, where he was 
an honor student and a leader of the 
ROTC program. A member of Kappa 
Alpha and of Scabard and Blade mili- 
tary fraternity, he was commissioned a 
second lieutenant in 1922. 

He spent the first two decades of his 
military career in infantry assignments, 
including tour of duty in Puerto Rico 
and Hawaii, and a tour as Professor of 
Military Science and Tactics at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland from 1928-1932. 
During World War II, Gen. Young 
served as secretary of the General Staff 
at the War Department in Washington 
and later as Commander of the 3rd In- 
fantry Division in Europe. He returned 
to Washington after the war to com- 
mand the military district there from 
1945-1948. One of his first duties was 
to arrange receptions for Gen. Dwight 
Eisenhower and other returning war 
heroes. 

Gen. Young returned to combat duty 
during the Korean conflict, commanding 
the 2nd Infantry Division. This division 
captured Heartbreak Ridge after one of 
the toughest battles of the war, on Oct. 
13, 1951. 

In 1953 he became Deputy Army 
Assistant Chief of Staff for Personnel, 
which position he held until July, 1956, 
when he became Commander of the 
Sixth Army, with headquarters at the 
Presidio, San Francisco. 

Gen. Young returned in September 
of 1957, following a ceremony in his 
honor at the Presidio. In his 35-year 
military career, he held a number of 
high staff positions, including Comman- 
dant of the Infantry School of Ft. Ben- 
ning, Ga., Commandant of the School 
of Combined Arms of the Command 
and General Staff College of Ft. Leaven- 
worth, Kansas, and Chief of Staff of the 
U. S. Army's Pacific forces. 

Gen. Young, called the University's 
"most distinguished military son," re- 
ceived awards including the Distin- 
guished Service Award, the Silver Star, 
two Bronze Stars, the Legion of Merit, 
and the Purple Heart. In addition, he 
was awarded the Distinguished Unit 
Citation Badge, the Croix de Guerre, 
and the Legion of Honor of France. 

Gen. Young was a member of the 
Beltsville Masonic Lodge. 

Interment was in Arlington National 
Cemetery, after a military funeral 
service at the Ft. Meyer Chapel. 



32 



the Maryland Magazine 



^ 




/ 




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it.. 



1 




1 



y 





So 

a 

c 
w 







to 

S3 

n 



WHOEVER YOU ARE, WHATEVER YOU DO, 
THE FORESTS OF THE SOUTH ARE IMPORTANT TO YOU 



et's take a close look at your Southern forests. There's 
tore to see than just trees. These forests and woodlands 
rovide income for millions of people throughout the 
Duthland. . .products and raw materials for thousands 
r industries throughout the world. What's more, the 
►rests provide water, protection against erosion . . . wild- 
fe for sportsmen and nature lovers . . . recreation and 
;enic beauty for all to enjoy. 
Yet, fire strikes these great natural resources over 



50,000 times a year throughout the South. Forest fires 
are started by people . . . people who are careless or 
malicious with fire. The losses are yours. What can you 
do about it? Guard against careless burning yourself, 
and report malicious burning to 
your local authorities. Remember, 
whoever you are, whatever you 
do — the forests of the South are 
important to you. 



IELP SMOKEY BEAR PREVENT FOREST FIRES IN THE SOUTH! 




'"c st» 



y 



/? 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 



magazine 

ruary I9( 







" 




-*> * ..-•» -»* ' 












» 

& : 






• A Continuing Journey 

• The Flying Dean 

• Miss Maryland Union 

• Inside Maryland Sports 








EUROPE 1965 

Central Europe - Scandinavia 

July 11 to August 8 

Once again the University of Maryland Alumni Association is 
sponsoring a European Tour for alumni and their families. The 
jet flight will depart from Friendship Airport in Baltimore and fly 
to London. Two tours will be available. The Central European 
Tour will visit London, Amsterdam, Cologne, the Rhine River 
(by boat), Wiesbaden, Heidelberg, Lucerne, Venice (including 
an evening seranata), Florence, Rome, Nice and Paris. The 
Scandinavia Tour will visit London, York, Edinburgh, Bergen, 
Laerdal, Voss, Oslo, Stockholm, Copenhagen, Berlin, Amsterdam 
and Paris. These are only the highlights. There is much more 
along the way. 

Flight Only: If you prefer, you may take the flight only. The 
approximate cost will be $318.00 round trip from Baltimore to 
London and Paris to Baltimore. 

How Much: Central Europe— $995.00 
Scandinavia— $1130.00 

And that includes all transportation, first class 
hotels (twin rooms with bath), entrance fees, tips 
and most meals. 

For complete details write to Victor Holm, Alumni Office, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, 20742. 
For more exciting news, see the inside back cover. 



the 




magazine 



Alumni Publication of the University of Maryland 
Volume XXXVI January-February Number G 




The Cover: Change of Classes near MeKeldin Library. Photograph by 
Diamondback, Steve Groer. 



2 A Continuing Journey 

1 \J The Flying Dean 

1 2 Which Girl is Miss Maryland Union? 

1 J What's New at the University? 

1 T" Inside Maryland Sports 

Y Alumni and Campus Notes 

22 Through the Years 



BOARD OF REGENTS 

CHARLES P. McCORMICK, Chairman 

EDWARD F. HOLTER, Vice-Chairman 

B. HERBERT BROWN, Secretary 

HARRY H. NUTTLE, Treasurer 

LOUIS L. KAPLAN, Assistant Secretary 

RICHARD W. CASE, Assistant Treasurer 

DR. WILLIAM B. LONG, M.D. 

THOMAS W. PANGBORN 

THOMAS B. SYMONS 

WILLIAM C. WALSH 

MRS. JOHN L. WHITEHURST 



DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 
President of the University 



OFFICE OF UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 
J. B. ZATMAN, Director 



OFFICE OF FINANCE AND BUSINESS 
C. WILBUR CISSEL, Director 



OFFICERS OF THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

MRS. ERNA R. CHAPMAN, '34, President 

THE HONORABLE JOSEPH L. CARTER, '25, Vice-President 

MYLO S. DOWNEY, '27, Vice President 

COL. J. LOGAN SCHUTZ, '38, '40, Secretary-Treasurer 

VICTOR HOLM, '57, Assistant Secretary 

OFFICE OF ALUMNI RELATIONS 
COL. J. LOGAN SCHUTZ, Director 



ROBERT H. BREUNIG, Editor 
JUDY SANDERS, Assistant Editor 
AL DANEGGER, Staff Photographer 
THOMAS ORPWOOD, News Editor 

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR 

ROBERTSON LEACH 
826 W. 40th Street 
Baltimore, Maryland 21211 
Telephone: Belmont 5-8302 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of Maryland, and entered at the Post Office College Park. Md. as second class mail 
matter under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879.-S3.00 per year Fifty cents the copy Member of American Alumni Council. 



a continuing journey 

to enlarge 
human understanding and wisdom 



by Dr. Ralph J. Klein 



THE TIME IS 7 O'CLOCK IN THE EVENING. THROUGHOUT 
the State of Maryland adult students are meeting in 
University of Maryland classes located in such places as 
Cumberland, Salisbury, Baltimore, and on-campus. At 
the extreme west end of the College Park campus — in 
the new Adult Education Center building — 35 electrical 
engineers and research scientists are discussing new devel- 
opments in analog simulation. More than 10,000 miles 
to the east, in Saigon, 3,500 miles to the west, in Berlin, 
and 2,600 miles to the north, at Thule, Greenland, Mary- 
land residence credit classes are starting. These courses 
are administered by University College which has its 
headquarters in the Adult Education Center. From this 
building, policy is formulated and directives are sent to 
a "campus*' which spans 24 countries on four continents. 

THE OVERSEAS PROGRAM 

University College is now celebrating the fifteenth anni- 
versary of the inception of its Overseas Program, a pro- 
gram which Arnold J. Toynbee, world-famous British 
historian, has characterized as "one of those American 
achievements from which the rest of the World has much 
to learn." 

University College was created by the Board of Regents 
in 1947. The new college was charged with the responsi- 
bility of providing higher education for adults within the 
State of Maryland. It did not receive, nor does it today, 

January-February, 1965 



any financial support from the State. Universit) College 

officials soon recognized that they could also meet the 
needs of military personnel stationed at near-by Tort 
George G. Meade, the Pentagon. Aberdeen Proving 
Ground, and at Boiling and Andrews Air Force Bases. 

Modest programs were at first proposed. The response, 
however, exceeded all estimates and additional clasps 
were organized during subsequent semesters. During the 
1964 Fall Semester, for example, more than 1.200 students 
enrolled in classes at the Pentagon. 

Thus, University College gained administrative experi- 
ence in olT-campus military surroundings. It was read) 
in 1949 when Armed Forces officials invited American 
universities to submit proposals for offering courses in 
Europe. 

Maryland's world-wide campus has posed problems tor 
its administrators not unknown to officials of off-campus 
programs at other institutions. Some of the problems, how- 
ever, have been unique. During its fifteen-year history, 
the Overseas Program has developed a corps of admin- 
istrators, many of whom have been teachers in the pro- 
gram, who are relatively young in average age but who 
are "old" overseas hands. Under the administrative direc- 
tion o( Dean Ray Ehrensberger. the) cope with these 
problems with the aid o\' space-shrinking techniques and 
devices in transportation and communication. Radio. 
trans-oceanic cables, conventional aircraft, and helicopters 
are some of the tools used. 



THE THREE OVERSEAS DIVISIONS 

Maryland's Overseas Program, like Gaul, has three divi- 
sions: the European, the Atlantic, and the Far East. 

In the fall of 1949, a small group of teachers was flown 
from Maryland to Germany to teach an anticipated 500 
students at six centers — Berlin, Frankfurt, Heidelberg, 
Munich, Nuremberg, and Wiesbaden. More than 1,800 
students enrolled for the first term. More qualified teachers, 
texts, and classrooms were needed. Dr. Ehrensberger was 
sent over to resolve the situation. Gradually, answers to 
problems never before faced by college administrators 
were found, and the European Division of the Overseas 
Program was established. 

The European Division, with its main office in Heidel- 
berg, Germany, and a local office just outside of London, 
England, administers courses offered on the continent of 
Europe, the United Kingdom, North Africa, and the 
Middle East. Two years after the beginning of this divi- 
sion, the military authorities at Munich requested that a 
similar program be provided at the freshman and sopho- 
more levels to meet the needs of the sons and daughters 
of government personnel, either service or civilian, who 
were qualified to do college level work. These courses, too, 
are of American college standard and are designed to 
meet the requirements of the first two years of the College 
of Arts and Sciences curriculum. Classes are offered dur- 
ing the daytime and dormitory facilities are available for 
students whose fathers are serving in the European area. 

In 1951, at the invitation of the military, the Atlantic 
Division was started. With its headquarters at the main 
Maryland campus at College Park, classes are now being 
offered at Air Force and Navy installations in Newfound- 
land, Labrador, Greenland, Iceland, Bermuda, and the 
Azores. 

The Far East Division, established in 1956, is the most 
recent of the three divisions but is second to the European 
in student enrollment. The University of California, which 
had offered courses in the Far East since 1950, withdrew 
from that area and recommended that the University of 
Maryland be invited as its replacement. This was done, 
and after President Wilson H. Elkins and the Board of 
Regents accepted the invitation, the task of establishing 
the new program was started. With administrative offices 
in Tokyo and Seoul, classes are conducted in Japan, Korea, 
Okinawa, Guam, Taiwan, and Viet Nam. 

In 1959, President Dwight D. Eisenhower congratu- 
lated Maryland: "In eighteen countries throughout the 
world the Special and Continuation Studies Program* of 
the University of Maryland enables our military personnel 
to advance their education and to earn college degrees. 
This program now includes the Far East with nearly 2,000 
American students enrolled in Japan, Okinawa, and Korea. 
This is a splendid investment and I know it will continue 
to expand for the good of our young people and the 
strength of the Nation." The late President John F. Ken- 
nedy commended the College for the contributions it had 
made in the past and wished "continuing success in your 
important mission for the future." 

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE: STATESIDE 

The increasing complexity of modern-day life, produced 
in part by the exploding rate of growth of man's knowl- 
edge, has strengthened the conviction that education is 
a lifelong process. This conviction has gained momentum 



* Now designated as "University College.' 



within the historical framework of the Land-Grant move- 
ment which has emphasized a balance between teaching, 
research, and service. Subscribing to this principle, the 
University through University College seeks to serve 
qualified adults by making the research and teaching talents 
of the University relevant to their life situations. 

Specifically, University College is committed to the task 
of providing opportunities of higher education that stimu- 
late the adult's intellectual life, promote his career, and 
develop his sense of individual and community responsi- 
bility. 

Evening courses have been offered by various depart- 
ments of the University since the 1920's. As mentioned 
earlier, University College was established in 1947 to ad- 
minister the adult evening program. In addition to the 
main office at College Park and the three overseas divi- 
sions, there are other additional major administrative 
divisions of the College. 

The Conferences and Institutes Division, established 
in 1952, has its headquarters in the new Adult Education 
Center. It offers conferences, institutes, short courses, and 
selective adult education programs at the College Park 
and Baltimore Campuses, and throughout the State of 
Maryland at the request of organized groups. These offer- 
ings are of a non-degree nature; however, under certain 
circumstances it may be possible to arrange special pro- 
grams adaptable to degree requirements. 

The College Park Evening Division was established 
in 1959 to serve adults in the College Park vicinity who 
are unable to attend daytime classes. This division began 
with an enrollment of 589 and 19 courses; during the 
past Fall semester 2,250 students registered for 115 
courses. It is administered by the Evening Division director 
and staff from the Adult Education Center. 

The Baltimore Division originated with a program of 
courses, primarily for teachers, in the mid-1920's. With 
the establishment of University College, the Baltimore 
program was incorporated into the College. This Division 
is administered by a director and staff with offices on the 
Baltimore campus at Lombard and Greene Streets. A 
broad program of credit courses is offered on the under- 
graduate and graduate levels. With a limited number of 
classrooms available, just over 1,900 students enrolled 
in 113 courses this past Fall. In addition, the Baltimore 
Division administers approximately 15 smaller centers 
located in the northeastern portion of the State where 
courses are offered for teachers, industrial personnel, mili- 
tary personnel, state and municipal employees, and prison 
inmates. 

The County Program for Teachers has developed 
with the cooperation of county school superintendents, the 
College of Education, and University College. Courses 
have been offered in the following Maryland counties: 
Allegany, Anne Arundel, Baltimore, Calvert, Caroline, 
Charles, Dorchester, Frederick, Garrett, Harford, Howard, 
Kent, Montgomery, Prince George's, Queen Anne's, Somer- 
set, St. Mary's, Talbot, Washington, Wicomico, and 
Worcester. 

It can be said, then, that the Maryland campus has 
come to the student in uniform in just about any American 
overseas military installation. It has been serving the people 
of Maryland from the State's western tip to the Atlantic 
Ocean; from counties bordering on Pennsylvania to the 
mouth of the Patuxent River in Southern Maryland. This 



The Maryland Magazine 






TACMHAWA 
EDUCATION CENTER 

pail 







January-February, 1965 





A class surveys the Tripoli Museum of Archaeology. 



American officers attend class in Germany. 



has been made possible by the cooperation, planning, and 
work of many people: from the Board of Regents and the 
central administration of the University to the young in- 
structor teaching at some remote installation in Korea, 
and especially by the hard-working American student. 

This effort will continue in the future. With the aid of 
the new Adult Education Center, the services rendered 
the people of Maryland and the Nation will expand. It 
has been made necessary by our times and America's new 
role in world affairs. 

OVERSEAS TEACHERS AND STUDENTS 

What is it like teaching military personnel overseas? This 
question is frequently asked by persons interested in join- 
ing the Overseas Program faculty. One of the best answers 
was made during the earlier years of the European Division 
by Dr. Loren Reid, past chairman of the University of 
Missouri's department of speech and past president of the 
American Speech Association, when he recounted his 
overseas teaching experiences in the Quarterly Journal of 
Speech. His observations serve also to portray the overseas 
student in uniform. 

After having attended his first European Division fac- 
ulty meeting in Germany, he and about 40 of his colleagues 
boarded a little local train, and about six of them got off 
at Wurtzburg, an important junction point. The others 
left on various trains after thoughtfully filling Dr. Reid's 
ears with good advice and counsel; when they left he felt 
as a stranger in a foreign land as he stood on the platform 
of the battered station and surveyed the bomb damage. 
Eventually his train pulled in, looking as battered as the 
station; the engine leaked more steam than it used, but 
it was on time, and he was quickly at his new assignment 
— Nurnberg. He made his way without difficulty to the 
front of the station, and decided to ask where the Grand 
Hotel was. He stopped a passerby and on him poured out 
practically his entire stock of German: "Wo ist der Grand 
Hotel?" "Gerade aus," his informant grunted, pointing 
straight across the street. And there it was, clearly and 
plainly labeled. Anyone could have seen it. Dr. Reid con- 
fesses that his beginning certainly was not auspicious. The 
next day, the Education Officer of the local Army post 
told him that registration was good in his Monday-Wednes- 
day evening class, but that since the Tuesday-Thursday 
class at Niirnberg had not materialized, a class had been 
arranged on those days at Bamberg, thirty miles away. 
This latter class was originally set up as a course in Political 
Science, but the Political Science professor had failed to 
materialize. He began to realize that he was the only 
University of Maryland professor in that part of the coun- 
try. In fact, he was the University of Maryland, except for 



a class in German, taught by a German national on a part- 
time appointment. 

His Nurnberg class contained twenty students: two 
majors, three captains, a few lieutenants and sergeants, 
and seven or eight enlisted men. Today, there would be 
more enlisted men. Half a dozen members of the class 
were on the instructional staff of the Intelligence School 
located on the post. The chief of the section, a captain, 
enrolled in the course and persuaded his junior officers 
to do likewise. A captain from the Education Office was 
also there, plugging away toward his Maryland degree. 
Two American civilians had enrolled: one was in charge 
of post transportation, and the other had been a clerk at 
the war trials. The Bamberg class had about the same 
variety of people, but was smaller in size. 

Dr. Reid clearly recalls that the first few minutes of 
the class seemed stiff and formal. The privates were over- 
awed by the thought of making speeches in the presence 
of majors. The majors were embarrassed at the idea of 
enduring critiques at the hands of privates. In order to set 
both camps at ease Dr. Reid explained that the classroom 
was a part of the University of Maryland campus, that, 
for the three hours they were together, he would consider 
them all as scholars with a thirst for knowledge, that, as 
he was a civilian, he would follow his usual practice of 
calling them "mister" in class, and, as he became 
acquainted with them, by various other names outside of 
class. He went on to say that he proposed to start at the 
beginning: that no one knew anything, formally, about 
speech making; and that the critiques would not be focused 
on personalities, but on the topic, "How can the speaker 
present ideas in an interesting and effective manner?" This 
statement cleared the air a good deal. A round of im- 
promptu introductions cleared it still more; and the ad- 
journment for the coffee break gave every one a chance 
to talk at once. When the class was resumed, it was the 
general feeling that the course would work out all right. 
At least Dr. Reid felt more relaxed. 

What were the speeches like? There were a series of 
short narrative speeches, mostly about previous civilian 
or military activities. A few of the students talked about 
their home towns, located all over the continental United 
States. Some had had amusing military experiences. There 
was a round of speeches in which the students talked about 
an aspect of their current military assignment. This shop 
talk was revealing to Dr. Reid and was enjoyed by the 
students. Perhaps they felt that the mission of the post was 
more important than they had realized. Dr. Reid observed 
that the students were older and wiser than students back 
home. He noticed their maturity in various ways. There 
were no speeches about dates and dating, though there 
were eloquent discussions of whether European girls made 



The Maryland Magazine 





Production management students visits an Okinawan factory. 



Ceremony for n students wim died m Munich aii crasl 



good wives; half a dozen members of the group had married 
continental girls. No speeches were offered on football 
or school spirit, but a good many discussions were held 
on "What's the matter with France?" or "How can we 
improve Anglo-German relations?" or "Is the Schumann 
Plan working?" The students discussed good places to 
travel, and how to get the most for one's money. And, as 
one would expect in Germany, endless talks were pre- 
sented on cameras and photography. 

The students also showed their maturity in the casual 
way in which they struck up friendships with Dr. Reid. 
Undergraduate students are traditionally self-conscious 
about making a move that might be interpreted by their 
fellows as a bid for the teacher's attention. Dr. Reid's 
students were neighborly. One student said, one night after 
class, "Professor, we thought you might enjoy visiting the 
Intelligence School and having luncheon with the men." 
When he agreed, they made a date, and a sergeant called 
for him in a jeep. Another volunteer, "I'm in charge of 
transportation around here: if you need a car on official 
business let me know." One student escorted him through 
the Niirnberg Palace of Justice: the courtroom, the prison, 
and the hanging chamber. With others he attended an 
American football game in the vast stadium where Hitler 
used to harangue the Nazis. 

Dr. Reid concedes that he may have overstated the 
pleasant features of the term. Two of the students did 
very poor work, and after conference he had to advise 
them to cancel their registration. Military duties, prin- 
cipally combat maneuvers, caused students to miss classes, 
and various expedients needed to be arranged to make up 
missed assignments. 

To attend the three-hour session at Bamberg Dr. Reid 
needed to leave his hotel at five p.m., meet the class, and 
hold conferences afterwards. On nights when a cold Euro- 
pean fog settled over the roads he would not get home until 
long after midnight. The preparation of lectures and other 
activities that would hold the attention of men and women 
tired from a long day on duty seemed to require a good 
deal of care. All in all, however, it was an experience that 
Dr. Reid states that he greatly valued. 

And through the years, the tradition has held. The 
American College campus has been extended to the four 
corners of the world, tens of thousands of Americans have 
listened and learned, and experienced the challenge and 
the delight of learning. Year after year, instructional per- 
sonnel have met the vagaries of weather, the challenge 
of time and distance, the discomfort of temporary quarters, 
and the inquiring minds of mature intellect. It has been 
a 15-year journey into uncertainty and opportunity — it 
remains a continuing journey to enlarge understanding 
and wisdom. 




January-February, 1965 



GREETINGS FROM AROUND THE WORLD 
MARK 15th ANNIVERSARY OF OVERSEAS PROGRAM 



The following letters and telegrams addressed to Dean 
Ray Ehrensberger and Dr. Mason G. Daly, Director of 
European Division, respectively, were received at Univer- 
sity College's Heidelberg office, headquarters for the 
European Division. 

Congratulations on your fifteenth anniversary. The educa- 
tional opportunity made possible by the University of Mary- 
land overseas to United States military personnel has been 
a significant contribution to the security of our nation. We 
are proud of you. An indication of the permanency of your 
contribution is reflected in the new center for adult education 
on the College Park campus. 

J. Millard Tawes, Governor of Maryland 

October 31, 1964, marks the 15th anniversary of the date 
on which the University of Maryland, in response to the 
request of the Department of Defense, established its European 
Division. Although the beginnings of this program in Germany 
were relatively modest, it now extends to four continents, 
offering its educational benefits to United States servicemen 
and women overseas virtually wherever they may be stationed 
anywhere throughout the world. 

Not only here in Europe, but also during my service as 
commander-in-chief of the United States Far East Command, 
I have seen direct evidence of the great value of the University 
of Maryland's overseas program. It has permitted those who 
participate in the program to enrich their lives through widened 
horizons and to add to their qualifications through increased 
knowledge and broadened understanding. 

Thus it has been of great individual benefit by enhancing 
capabilities which are of value in either military or civilian 
life. At the same time, since the effectiveness of an organiza- 
tion reflects the effectiveness of the individuals who comprise 
it, this program is making a most worthwhile contribution to 
the success of the United States Armed Forces serving over- 
seas in carrying out their vital missions. 

The enthusiasm with which the members of the United 
States military services have received the University of Mary- 
land's overseas program is clear evidence of their appreciation 
of the opportunity it provides and the service it is rendering. 

On behalf of all the men and women of the United States 
European Command, I extend warm congratulations to the 
University of Maryland on this important anniversary and 
on the years of achievement which it represents and best 
wishes for continued success throughout the years ahead. 
General Lyman L. Lemnitzer 
Supreme Allied Commander in Europe 



Please celebrate for all of us the 15th anniversary of the 
European branch. You and your staff have made a remarkable 
record. Congratulations to all of you from the University 
community and a personal salute. 

Wilson H. Elkins, President of the University 



Heartiest congratulations to everyone connected with over- 
seas schools University of Maryland fifteenth anniversary of 
establishment, foreign University of Maryland branches. Will 
be sharing observance in spirit recalling memorable visits to 
Heidelberg graduation ceremonies. Offer heartfelt prayers for 
continued success in all branches in foreign lands. 

Theodore R. McKeldin, Mayor of Baltimore 



"The record of more than 200,000 USAFE off-duty stu- 
dents enrolling in Maryland courses over the past decade- 
and-a-half has contributed to new dimensions of understand- 
ing between the United States and our Allies. . . . The Univer- 
sity provides USAFE officers and airmen with a broad basis 
of sound general education as well as the tools for a more 
thorough linguistic and cultural acquaintance with our host 
countries. . . ." 

General Gabriel P. Disosway 
USAFE Commander-in-Chief 



. . . Since its beginning, the European Division has ex- 
panded its efforts in order to provide increasing opportunities 
for the troops of this command to complete or begin studies 
for a college degree. For the individual soldier this has opened 
important ways to improve his status in life, in both his mili- 
tary and post military careers. On a broader scale, the Euro- 
pean Division has contributed to the will for excellence in 
the Army in the area of intellectual development. It has helped 
promote leadership by widening the horizons of military men 
in their understanding of historical, political and cultural 
problems. 

It is reassuring to observe that the European Division con- 
tinues to be responsive to the changing educational needs of 
this command. The recent introduction of special courses and 
programs to up-date their professional personnel and to in- 
crease the cultural understanding of the countries in which 
we live, are characteristic of your institution's foresight and 
educational leadership. 

General Paul L. Freeman, Jr. 
Commander in Chief, USA 



8 



The Maryland Magazine 




January-February, 1965 






THE FLYING DEAN 



T 



HE GREAT NAVIGATOR FERDINAND 

Magellan, the fictional Phineas Fogg, 
and Dr. Ray Ehrensberger, have 
something in common: an inclination 
to travel, preferably around the 
world. Magellan sailed for "gold, 
glory and God"; Fogg, on a bet with 
a deadline of ninety days; and Ehrens- 
berger to oversee the vast overseas 
and stateside adult higher educational 
program of the University of Mary- 
land. 

Appointed Dean of University Col- 
lege in 1952, Dr. Ehrensberger has 
spent thousands of hours in aircraft, 
mostly military, visiting the approxi- 
mately 200 scattered Maryland cen- 
ters. Although he has lost count, he 
has made about 30 flying trips to 
Europe, a dozen to the Far East, and 
14 trips around the world. He logged 
over 4,000 hours in propeller-driven 
airplanes, but hasn't kept a record 
since the advent of the jet because 
"jet hours don't mean so much." He 
estimates that over half of the hours 
logged were in military bucket seat 
jobs (bare essentials) and usually in 
small aircraft, such as the C-47. He 
has also flown in helicopters, bush 
planes, and an assortment of other 
single-engined aircraft. 

With his main office located in the 
new Center of Adult Education at 



the College Park campus, he main- 
tains desk space in University College 
offices in Tokyo, Heidelberg, Seoul, 
and London. Indeed, Dr. Ehrens- 
berger is away from his home in Col- 
lege Park, where he resides with his 
wife and two teen-age children, at 
least six months out of each year. 

A Hoosier by birth, he earned his 
Bachelor's degree in Speech from Wa- 
bash College. This accomplishment, 
incidentally, was delayed, temporarily 
at least, by his participation in a host 
of extra-curricular activities. Since 
then he has taken an active interest 
in Wabash affairs. With a Master's 
degree in History from Butler Univer- 
sity, where he financed his way by 
stoking a steam locomotive, and a 
doctorate in Speech from Syracuse 
University, and after several teaching 
assignments, he became Chairman of 
Maryland's Department of Speech. 

As one newspaper feature writer 
observed, talking to Dr. Ehrensberger 
is almost like operating a computer 
machine. As you feed in the ques- 
tions, he pours out the answers with 
lightning speed and accuracy. "A re- 
porter interviewing him needs to be 
a shorthand expert or mental wizard 
with a photographic mind to keep 
pace with him." Despising pomposity 
and sham, he has what would seem 



to an outsider an easy-going, winsome 
personality. This description would 
make those who work for him cringe. 
To them, he is extremely sensitive to 
his physical and human environment 
possessing the sometimes embarrass- 
ing ability to peal off irrelevancies 
and pierce the heart of a problem. A 
man of considerable creative origin- 
ality, he has the sense enough to 
harness these ideas not only to the 
future of the University but to the 
task at hand. 

Historians, although they may 
praise or condemn John D. Rocke- 
feller on other matters, generally agree 
that one of his main attributes was 
his ability to pick the right man for 
the right job and then give that per- 
son authority, and also responsibility. 
Dr. Ehrensberger, on many public 
occasions, has stated that his staff 
represented the essence of the efforts 
and accomplishments of University 
College. Members of that staff are 
recognized as national leaders in 
adult education. For example, Dr. 
Stanley J. Drazek, Associate Dean, is 
currently the president of the National 
University Extension Association. 
This body is composed of over a 
hundred leading American and Ca- 
nadian universities engaged in adult 
education. 



10 



Thf Maryland Magazine 






A favorite Ehrensberger exclama- 
tion to his staff when they encounter 
frustrating problems is, "You never 
had it so good." In a good humored 
but, alas, abortive attempt to silence 
this admonition once and for all, the 
European Division Director, Dr. 
Mason G. Daly, invited the Dean to 
his apartment for dinner. In the mean- 
time, Dr. Daly and his Heidelberg 
staff removed all the furniture from 
the Daly apartment. The Dean arrived 
at the appointed time to be greeted 
by bare walls and floors, thin soup, 
flat beer, and assorted administrators 
dressed in their worst. 

Asked if he had ever been scared 
on his travels, he promptly replied 
that he had been "so damn many 
times — but who hasn't?" He has in- 
deed had some close calls. For ex- 
ample, he was scheduled on a certain 
flight from Hawaii to Tokyo. Because 
his airplane to Hawaii from San Fran- 
cisco was late, he missed his connec- 
tion. The Tokyo-bound aircraft com- 
pletely disappeared. On another occa- 
sion, he caught the wrong flight to 
Europe. The airplane on which he 
should have been went down off of 
Iceland. The Washington Star called 
his home for information to be con- 
tained in an obituary. 



Any one who has ridden stripped- 
down military aircraft knows how un- 
comfortable they can be, even under 
normal conditions. But add to this a 
55-below zero temperature. On a 
flight from Thule, Greenland, to Goose 
Bay, Labrador, the cabin heaters 
went out on the C-54 on which Dr. 
Ehrensberger was a passenger. Hav- 
ing passed the point of no return, the 
pilot flew on for seven hours. Fortu- 
nately, the Air Force had furnished 
all passengers with Arctic clothing, 
but it was still a frigid flight. 

Turning from the Arctic to the 
Mediterranean for another close one, 
but with comic overtones, Dr. Ehrens- 
berger was accompanied by an Air 
Force acquaintance on a flight from 
Athens to Tripoli. No other passen- 
gers were aboard. Smoke started pour- 
ing into the cabin. A crew member 
came back and announced that they 
were going to ditch. Properly strapped 
in, the traveling companions looked 
across the compartment to where their 
briefcases were located. The Dean 
said, "I've got a thousand dollars in 
green in mine." His friend said. "I've 
got a bottle of whiskey in mine." The 
Dean replied, "I'll trade you even." 
He later confessed that although he 
was a beer drinker, he felt that a bottle 



of whiskey in a life raft was far more 
important than any one thousand dol- 
lars. The trade, however, was never 
consummated because the tire was 
brought under control and a safe land- 
ing made. 

But such experiences are the ex- 
ception. The long monotonous hours 
in the air and in waiting rooms are 
the rule. To describe this part of his 
job. Dr. Ehrensberger likes to borrow 
a phrase from Sergeant Shriver. "it 
is made up of equal parts of frustra- 
tion and amoebic dysentery." Despite 
his protestations, it is difficult to be- 
lieve that he does not obtain at least 
some enjoyment out of his nomadic 
way of life. Perhaps he has had to 
report at 3:00 a.m. to airline desks 
in terminals a thousand miles from 
nowhere with a bottle of Kaopeetate 
in his hand luggage only to have the 
flights delayed for hours or cancelled. 
Yet. he has made a host of friends 
around the world who include the 
most famous names in each country. 
Also, he has the satisfaction of know- 
ing that he heads a program lauded 
by statesmen and foreign scholars as 
being an American achievement from 
which the rest of the world has much 
to learn. 



January-February, 1965 



11 




Which Girl is Miss Maryland Union? 



Of these nine finalists for the title of "Miss Maryland 
Union" one was certain to be selected. Pictured from 
left to right were: Susan Coppage, Gail Duncan, Melody 
Shaub, Wendy Linzey, Lorraine Michelson, Donna Dye, 
Sheila Deitz, Eileen Aptaker and Rosemary Sisler. 

But one finalist was not able to be present. She was 
Sandy Johnson, pictured to the right. She is shown dancing 
with William Erler, President of the Student Union Board, 
after she was named "Miss Maryland Union" at the annual 
Winter Wonderland Dance. 




12 



The Maryland Magazine 





The Maryland Glee Club in performance with the 
National Symphony Orchestra at Constitution Hall. 



( ollege women are partic ipating 
experiment to determine the adeq 
ol minimized protein requirement 
synthetic amino acids in wheal gluten 



What's New at the University? 



- 





The photograph to the left is the fourth such observed of the 

decay of a sub-atomic particle. The diagram below indicates 
(1) a K-meson colliding with a proton I ; > which produces an 
Omega-minus particle and other particles, ("he work is the result 
of physicists at Maryland and the U. S. Nasal Research I abora- 
tory. 





A pump-oxygenator machine 

replaces the pumping action 
of the heart and the owgen 
ating function of the lungs 
It enables surgeons to direct 
l\ \ isuah/e the area of con 

cei n At University Hospital 

ibis de\ ice is made moie ic 
liable through the use of .1 
stand-b) emergency powei 
and torque generator. 




k 



Don Dunphy 



Frank Costello 



could have been undefeated at the time. Two of its four pre- 
Christmas losses came in overtime, another by two points and 
the other by one. By the same token, Maryland had a little 
luck of its own, winning two of its victories by one and three- 
point margins before shellacking Wake Forest by 18. 

Millikan was getting considerable help from a trio of 
sophomores one of whom, Jay McMillen of Mansfield, Penna., 
was giving the junior Gary Ward a hot race for individual 
scoring honors. McMillen's 26 points against Penn State in 
the opener and again against Kansas in the seventh game 
were high for the early December games, and his 142 points 
(20.3 average) were only three behind Ward (20.7 average). 

Joe Harrington, a good-looking, well-built youth from 
Phippsburg, Maine, moved into the center spot in the sixth 
game and was the team's third leading scorer as it disbanded 
for a short Christmas recess. The squad reassembled on De- 
cember 26, the day before it took a jet down to Miami for the 
tournament involving Tulsa, Yale and Miami. 

Filling out the starting five were the juniors Neil Brayton 
and Mike DeCosmo at guards. Brayton started off the season 
with a tremendous feat, sinking a shot from near mid-court 
which turned an apparent one-point defeat at the hands of 
Penn State into a 72-71 opening-game triumph. 



Inside Maryland Sports 

by Bill Dismer 
Director of Sports Information 

ALTHOUGH THE WINTER SPORTS SEASON IS HALF OVER, THE 
most exciting portions of the basketball, swimming and 
wrestling campaigns are still ahead for Cole Field House fans 
who will have three straight weekends of championship compe- 
titions available to them. 

Highlighting the Atlantic Coast Conference season of 
swimming and wrestling will be the ACC swim meet sched- 
uled for the Cole Field House pool February 25-26-27. The 
following week (March 5 and 6) all of the Conference 
wrestling teams will compete, while a week later the gym 
will be the scene of the NCAA regional basketball playoffs, 
with two games scheduled the evenings of March 12 and 13. 

At this writing, Maryland figures to have the favorite 
teams in both swimming and wrestling, with the basketball 
team given only an outside chance of making the playoffs. 
Indeed, the Terp grapplers — under Coach Sully Krouse for 
the 18th season — are odds-on-choices to win their 1 1th straight 
ACC title, having entered the season with a string of 59 
consecutive conference victories. Bob Stumpff, manager of 
the wrestling team who doubles as one of my student assist- 
ants, has a lot more to tell you about the grapplers further on. 

Coach Bill Campbell's swimming team, whose only dual 
meet loss last winter came at the hands of co-champion North 
Carolina by ONE point (a half yard separated the Terps from 
beating the Tar Heels in the last event) appears strong again. 
Campbell's team subsequently won the conference meet at 
Chapel Hill to tie Carolina for the championship. Linn Hen- 
dershot, my other student assistant who also manages Mary- 
land's baseball team, will have more details on this later in 
this article. 

The NCAA regional basketball playoffs take place the 
week after the ACC tournament at Raleigh. Incidentally, the 
Atlantic Coast Conference champion this year draws a bye 
and will not be forced to play in the preliminaries the first 
part of the week, automatically qualifying for the two-night 
tournament here. 

Although it went to Florida for the Hurricane Classic 
tournament at Miami right after Christmas with a 3-4 record, 
Coach Bud Millikan's basketball team, with a little luck, 



Been paying much attention to freshmen basketball? Coach 
Frank Fellows' team won five of its first seven games and 
there are stories of three individuals on the team which are 
rather interesting. For one thing, Maryland's first two Negro 
basketball recruits, Julius Johnson of nearby Seat Pleasant 
and Billy Jones of Towson, are two of the three top scorers. 
Johnson, a six-footer from Fairmont Heights, was just one 
point shy of a 20-point average, and his 29 points against the 
George Washington freshmen was the high game for the first 
seven. Incidentally, the Baby Terps piled up their highest 
score, 1 1 1 points, against the GW yearlings. Jones was 
averaging 17 points after seven starts. 

Less publicized and lesser-known is the background of the 
smallest man on the squad, 5-foot-9 John Avery of Youngs- 
town, Ohio (the same city which gave the varsity Neil Bray- 
ton). Avery starred his first two years in high school and 
seemed all set for a big senior year, when a routine X-ray 
after the team's first game revealed a collapsed lung. Avery 
spent two weeks in the hospital and most of the winter rest- 
ing, but he did come back to play the last five games of the 
season with his Chaney High team which won the sectional 
championship. He was running second to Johnson in scoring 
at year's end, with an 18.1 average. 

The frosh play 6:15 preliminaries to each of the varsity's 
home games, and if you haven't seen them, they're worth 
a look. They'll be playing the Virginia frosh (one of two 
teams which has beaten them) on February 17, the Catholic 
and American U. yearlings on February 23 and 26 and wind 
up with a big one — against the perennially powerful DeMatha 
High five on the 27th. 



With the exception of the dual meet with Navy at Annapolis 
in mid-January, Coach Jim Kehoe's track team doesn't appear 
in this area during its winter season, but it is scheduled for 
three dual meets and seven federation or conference meets 
through March 5. Toronto and Baltimore are the other teams 
it will face in dual competition. 

Twenty-five returning lettermen give Kehoe hopes that 
Maryland's colors will fly high at such meets as the Millrose 
games in New York (January 28), Boston A. A. games (Jan- 
uary 30), Philadelphia Inquirer games (February 5), V.M.I. 
Relays (February 6), New York Athletic Club meet (Feb- 
ruary 11), A.A.U. in New York (February 20), New York 
Knights of Columbus meet (February 25), the Atlantic Coast 
Conference meet at Raleigh (February 27), I.C.4A meet in 



14 



The Maryland Magazine 



New York (March 5) and the Track & Field Federation meet 
in Detroit (March 15). 

Incidentally, Maryland has won the ACC meet 10 ot the 
1 I times it has been staged. North Carolina winning the other 
time. 



Maryland was leading in competition tor the Carmichael 
Cup, symbolic of athletic supremacy in the AC'C, following 
the football, soccer and cross-country seasons. Coach Doyle 
Royal's soccer team, which finished with an overall record 
of 8-2, swept four ACC opponents for its 12th consecutive 
conference title, and the cross-country repeated as conference 
champ. The football team's surprising finish in a three-\\a\ 
tie for third place added a few more unexpected points. last 
year, Maryland lost the cup for the first time since it was put 
into competition- — by half a point. 



As for the swimming team, read what Linn Hendershot 
has to say: 

Swimming at the University of Maryland is becoming quite 
the thing as the Terps continue to roll. One of the key men 
on Coach Bill Campbell's team is senior Donald Dunphy. 

"Doc," as he is called by his teammates, hails from New- 
burg, New York. According to Coach Campbell, "Doc" has 
developed from an average high school swimmer to an ex- 
cellent college swimmer. His hard work and desire have helped 
him establish a Maryland varsity record in the 200-yard 
butterfly, he is a member of the Maryland varsity 400-yard 
Medley record breakers, and held the 200-yard backstroke 
record until recently. 

Besides being a standout swimmer, "Doc" is also a standout 
student. He is a member of three honoraries, Omicron Delta 
Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi, and Phi Alpha Theta. He was also 
chosen to Who's Who at Maryland, a member of the Varsity 
M-Club, on the ACC Honor Roll for the last three years, on 
the Dean's list for the last two years, and carries a 3.5 aca- 
demic average into his last year. 

"Doc" is a history major with a science minor. He plans 
to enter the Penn State School of Optometry in Philadelphia 
next fall. 

The University of Maryland salutes Donald "Doc" Dunphy. 



Maryland's wrestling team has most of its meets during 
the second semester. This should prove advantageous to the 
Krousemen, since two new faces, those of Ail-American Tim 
Geiger and sophomore Steve Sauve, will be seen by Terp 
opponents. Both grapplers sat out the first semester because of 
eligibility rules. 

Providing the Terps lose no more men via the injury route, 
they should be tougher the second half of the season. Lost 
for the season was their classy, 123-pounder, Tom Schleicher 
(Allentown, Pa.) with a shoulder injury in the opening match 
with Army. He underwent surgery just before the Christmas 
vacation. 

Maryland's starting lineup for the rest of the year will in- 
clude the following: 123 — Jim Arnoult (Wheaton, Md.) or 
Tom Norris (Silver Spring, Md.), 130 — Milt Thomas (Lewis- 
town, Pa.), 137 — John Henderson (Lewistown, Pa.) or Kent 
Webster (Hughesville, Pa.), 147 — Tri-Captain Nelson Aurand 
(Lewistown, Pa.) or John Bertinatti (Teaneck, N. J.), 157 — 
Tri-Captain and Ail-American Bob Kopnisky, 167 — Amando 
Soto (Union, N. J.), or Steve Sauve (Mechanicsburg, Pa.), 
177— Bob Karch (Mill Hall, Pa.) or Tri-Captain and Ail- 
American Tim Geiger (Kensington, Md.), HVW — Olaf Droz- 
dov (Pennsville, N. J.). 

The Terrapins have three Atlantic Coast Conference meets 
left. They are N. C. State, Duke, and North Carolina. On 
December 17, the Krousemen recorded their 51st consecutive 



X( < win with no losses against \ irginia '<•■ 
Virginia, expected to be the rerps toughest v < nenl 

this year, couldn't even registei a single win, onl) a draw .>i 
1 23 pounds, 

rhe Red and White also have to contend with perennial 
I astern and national mal powers Navj Pitt, and Penn Si 
rhe rerps nevei have beaten I'm noi Penn State but thi 
could be the yeai since it won'l be hard to gel up foi them 
since both ol these battles will be fought in Pennsylvania 
Maryland's Pennsylvania dominated team Navj invades < ole 
Field House Saturday, Feb. I * al 8:00 P M rhe Krousemen 
will be seeking revenge foi last year's 2 I 9 shell. 
the hands ot the Middies. I his w.is I d Peery's first win • 
a K rouse-coached team, and Maryland's firsl loss to N 

since the 59-60 season. 

On March 5-6, ( ole 1 ield House will be the scene ol the 

llth annual Atlantic Coast Conference Wrestling I"oui 
ment. The Terp matmen ol Coach Sullj Krouse own II 
ACC titles Maryland's returning champs include Nelson 
Aurand (157). Tim Geiger (1 9 1 i . lohn Henderson (1 
Bob Kopnisky (147). and Amando Soto (167), Schleichei 
would have been the returning 115-pound champ 

The last weekend in March. 25-27. the NCAA < hampion- 
ships will be held at the University ol Wyoming. I asl year 
Maryland sent four men to Cornell University and returned 
to College Park with three All-Americas and place winners 
They were Marshall Dauberman (177). and Tim Geigei 
(167) fourth; and Bob Kopnisky (157) tilth. I he team fin- 
ished with a national ranking of ninth — the best ever in 
Maryland history. This year could be the Terps best showing 
yet if allowed to enter a full team. 



As the days grow longer, the talk of baseball ahead) tills 
the air at Maryland. 

Coach E. S. "Jack" Jackson features an excellent varsity, 
a good crop of Freshmen, and a white haired man named 
H. L. Stevens, known as "Whitey" to the boys. 

"Whitey" will be handling the Maryland Frosh this year. 
"Whitey," a retired government worker, has been involved 
with baseball for many, many baseball campaigns. 

Coach Jackson and Coach Stevens are hoping to make 
1965 the year for the beginning of a Terp reign in the 
Atlantic Coast Conference. 



The Terp Track Team is now in the midst ol the 1965 
Indoor Track Season. Two of the key men on Coach Jim 
Kehoe's team are sprinter Steve Lamb and sophomore high 
jump sensation Frank Costello. 

Steve Lamb, a senior at Maryland, will be out to better 
his 440 and 220-yard dash marks of last year. Steve, a Bait i- 
morean, ran the 440 in 47.5 and the 220 in 21.1. 

After graduation. Steve hopes to go on to graduate school 
or to law school. He is a member of the American Marketing 
Association and Zeta Beta Tau fraternity. 

The 21 -year-old sprinter looks to be a ke\ factor in both 
the dashes and the relays. 

Another youngster who has people buzzing is a fantastic 
sophomore from Union, N. J.. Frank Costello. As a senior 
in high school, Frank was ranked as the best high school 
high jumper in the East. 

As a frosh, Frank jumped 6'8%" and earl} this yeai 
cleared 6'9V4". The fantastic leaper will be hoping to clear 
the bar at seven feet or better this season. 

Frank, a Physical Education major, was graduated from 
Union High School, and was coached b\ Paul Corrigan. He 
set a New Jersey record by leaping 6'6% ". The old record w.is 
held by Milt Campbell of Plainfield. N. J. Campbell was the 
Olympic Decathlon Champion in 1956. 



January-February, 1965 



15 




UNIVERSITY CALENDAR OF EVENTS 



FEBRUARY 

1 Swim Meet, Duke, Home 

4 Engineering Alumni Annual 

Mid-winter Banquet 
2-5 Spring Semester Registration 

5 Swim Meet, V.M.I., Home 

5 Alumni Club of Greater Baltimore 
Oyster Roast 

5 "M" Club-sponsored pro basket- 
ball, Bullets vs. Warriors, 
Alumni Coffee Hour following 
1 1 The Romeros (Classical and 
Flamenco guitarists) 

8 Spring Semester begins 
12 Alumni Council meeting with 
deans 



13 Wrestling, Navy, Home 

15 Swim Meet, South Carolina, 

Home 

16 Swim Meet, Clemson, Home 

17 Basketball, Virginia, Home 

18 University Chamber Orchestra 

Concert 

22 Washington's Birthday, Holiday 

23 Basketball, Duke, Home 

25 National Symphony Orchestra 

Concert 
25-27 A.C.C. Swim Meet, 
College Park 

26 Basketball, Clemson, Home 

27 Basketball, South Carolina, Home 



MARCH 

3 University Concert Band Concert 
11-14 UT, "Knight of the Burning 

Pestle" 
12 Boston Pops Orchestra 
18 University Opera 
25-27 Aqualiners, "Disneyland" 
26 Alumni Club of Greater Balti- 
more dinner and lecture, con- 
tinuing education program 

APRIL 

1 National Symphony Orchestra 
Concert 



New Jersey Dental Alumni 

The annual meeting of the New Jersey 
Alumni Society of the Baltimore Col- 
legs of Dental Surgery, University of 
Maryland Dental School, was held at 
the Newarker Restaurant, Newark, New 
Jersey. 

The business meeting was conducted 
by the President, James F. Mahon, '51. 

Officers who will serve for the com- 
ing year are: President, Jack M. Eskow, 
'33; Pres.-Elect, Richard Cabana, '57; 
V-Pres., Saul M. Gale, '22; Treas., Sam- 
uel H. Byer, '27; Secretary, John J. 
Daub, '5 1 and e.\-officio James F. Ma- 
hon, '51. 

Trustees for the Fridberg Memorial 
Fund are Edmund Bonne, '41; John J. 
Cirillo, '52; Bernard DeHosson, '47; 
Alfred Rapuana, '57; Paul Torre, '51 
and Elwood Snyder, Jr., '57. 

The Executive Board is comprised 
of H. Milton Cooper, '36; Gerard A. 
Devlin, '23; Alan A. Gale, '50; Robert 



J. Jernick, '50; George Reusch, '41 and 
Elwood Snyder, Sr., '31. 

Dr. Frank J. Houghton, '17 of Belle- 
ville, N. J., was honored on his retire- 
ment after thirteen years as dean of the 
Loyola University School of Dentistry, 
New Orleans. 

Dr. John J. Salley, Dean of the Den- 
tal School, Baltimore, spoke on the 
plans for the new dental school and 
showed slides of the present facilities 
as well as the progress being made on 
the entire Baltimore campus. 

The National Alumni Association was 
represented by Dr. Calvin J. Gaver, '54. 
Dr. Joseph P. Cappucio, '46 addressed 
the group on the role the alumni plays 
in maintaining the outstanding reputa- 
tion of the school, as well as the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

Law Alumni in the News 

University of Maryland Law School 
graduates have made state and national 
news within the past few months, focus- 



ing attention not only upon themselves 
and the offices to which they have been 
appointed or elected, but also upon 
their alma mater. 

Joseph D. Tydings, LL.B. '53, was 
elected United States Senator in the 
November election, joining Daniel B. 
Brewster, LL.B. '49, in that body. 

Governor J. Millard Tawes recently 
announced the appointment of Judge 
Wilson K. Barnes, LL.B. '31, Associate 
Member of the Supreme Bench of Bal- 
timore City, to fill the vacancy on the 
Bench of the Court of Appeals of 
Maryland. 

Judge Barnes was awarded his law 
degree from the University of Mary- 
land School of Law in 1931, and was 
admitted to the Bar the same year. Prior 
to his appointment to the Supreme 
Bench, Judge Barnes was a member 
and secretary of the Maryland State 
Board of Law Examiners. 

Charles M. Mathias, LL.B. '49, was 
elected Congressman from the Sixth 
District of Maryland. 



16 



The Maryland Magazine 



Harry T. Phoebus, Jr., I.L.B. '51, has 
been named to the Maryland Senate 
seat vacated by the death of his father. 
State Sen. Harry I . Phoebus, Somerset 
County Republican who died Novem- 
ber 30, 1964. 

Somerset County's new senator, born 
at Oriole, as was his father, attended 
public schools of the county and Char- 
lotte Hall Military Academy. He was 
graduated from the University of Mary- 
land and from its law school in 1951, 
when he began practicing law. 

He spent 2>A years in the Adjutant 
General's Office of the Army and holds 
a reserve captain's commission. 

In private law practice in Crisfield 
since 1954, the younger Phoebus is at- 
torney to the county commissioners and 
county board of education. He belongs 
to the Asbury Methodist Church, Rotary 
Club, Junior Chamber of Commerce, 
American Legion, Elks, Fire Depart- 
ment, and Farm Bureau. 

He married the former Janet Riggin 
of Crisfield in 1961. 

The late senator's other son, 1. Theo- 
dore, clerk of Somerset County Circuit 
Court, gave his brother the oath of 
office. 

The following Judges were elected 
to 15-year terms to the Supreme Bench 
of Baltimore City: Wilson K. Barnes, 
LL.B. '31; J. Harold Grady, LL.B. '42; 
Charles D. Harris, LL.B. '33. 

John A. McGuire, LL.B. '48 was 
elected to a 10-year term as Judge, 
Municipal Court of Baltimore City. 



Howard Crist Appointed 
to Replace Abe Gottwals 

Howard G. Crist, Jr. was appointed 
Agricultural representative on the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Alumni Council, 
rilling the vacancy left by the untimely 
death of Abram Gottwals. 

Mr. Crist is a 1940 graduate of the 
University's School of Agriculture and 
was Director of Feed Distribution for 
Southern States Cooperative, Inc., Rich- 
mond, Va., for 1 1 years. He served as 
a naval officer during World War II. 

He is now engaged in an agricultural 
retail business at Sykesville and Ellicott 
City. Mr. Crist has been active in local 
civic affairs, is a Director of the Agri- 
culture Alumni Association of the Uni- 
versity and Legislative Chairman of the 
Howard County Farm Bureau. 

Mr. Crist resides with his wife and 
family on Burnt Woods Road near 
Glenelg. Mrs. Crist is currently Presi- 
dent of the Board of Education, Secre- 
tary of the Maryland Association of 
Boards of Education and a member of 
the Advisory Council of the Catonsville 
Community College. 

They have two sons, Howard, who 
is serving the Army, and Douglas, who 
is a senior at Glenelg High School. 




Dr. Daniel Swern Receives 
Food Chemistry Award 

Dr. Daniel Swern, Ph.D. '40, Philadel- 
phia, Pa., has been named the recipient 
of the 1964 Charles F. Spencer Award. 
The award has been made annually 
since 1955 for distinguished achieve- 
ments in agricultural and food chem- 
istry. The Spencer Chemical Division, 
Gulf Oil Corporation, is sponsor of the 
award. 

The Charles F. Spencer Award was 
established by the late Kenneth A. Spen- 
cer, who was the founder of Spencer 
Chemical Company, in memory of his 
father in 1955. The award, which con- 
sists of a bronze medallion and a $1,001) 
honorarium, is administered by the 
Kansas City Section of the American 
Chemical Society. 

The award was presented to Dr. 
Swern at the annual Kansas City Chem- 
istry Conference held November 19 on 
the campus of the University of Mis- 
souri at Kansas City. At that time, he 
delivered an address entitled "Epoxida- 
tion — An Up-to-Date-Appraisal." 

Dr. Swern is Senior Research In- 
vestigator, Fels Research Institute, 
School of Medicine, and Professor of 
Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts, both 
at Temple University in Philadelphia. 

Much of Dr. Swern's career has been 
devoted to research work with the 
fundamental organic chemistry of fats. 
Important industrial developments stem- 
ming from this work have benefited 
agriculture through extensive utilization 
of agricultural products. 

He is the author or co-author of 155 
publications and 56 patents. Dr. Swern 
is presently writing a series of books on 
Organic Peroxides and has just com- 
pleted a book on Industrial Fat Chem- 
istry. 

A previous winner from Maryland 
was Dr. E. V. McCollum. Professor 
Emeritus of Johns Hopkins University. 



Alumnus Appointed to Key 
Space Post m Pai is 

l In- appointment of a NASA 

sentative in I uropc to ni ■ 

live space interests has been annoui 

bj the National Aeronaut 

Administration 

Gilbert W. I 

M S 58 formerl) pecial assistant foi 
international program activities al the 
Goddard Space I light I enter, will I 
up Ins new duties tins month He will 
be attached to the I S I mbassy in 
Paris .is \ \s \ representative undei the 
direction ol the Office ol lniein.ition.il 
Programs. 

Ouslej will handle N \s \ relations 
with Western European regional and 
national space organizations in coo| 
live projects and othei joint space 
ence activities, IK- also will serve 

point ol contact lor scientific and tech 

nical information ol space activities 
here and in I in ope. 




Assignment ol a NASA representative 
in Europe reflects the growing import- 
ance and volume o\ the agency's inter- 
national programs in thai area. Joint 
projects for scientific satellites engi- 
neered and financed in Europe and to 
be launched by NASA are under\\a\ 
in England. France, and Italy. \n agree- 
ment recently was reached between 
NASA and the ninc-countr\ European 
Space Research Organization lor two 
additional satellite projects. Other joint 
projects to date have involved 69 dif- 
ferent countries in cooperation with 
NASA. 

Ouslej is a native ol Washington, 
D. C. 

Prior to Ins appointment, Mr. Ouslej 
was m charge ol International Programs 



January -February, 1965 



17 



at the NASA Goddard Space Flight 
Center, in Greenbelt, Md.. a position 
he held since late 1961. He joined God- 
dard in 1959 and served as head of the 
Structure and Systems Integration Sec- 
tion in the Center's Spacecraft Systems 
and Projects Division. Before joining 
the NASA, he worked at the Naval 
Ordnance Laboratory as a Missile De- 
sign Engineer. 

He presently is writing a thesis on 
"Dynamic Stresses in Thick-walled Cyl- 
inders" as the last requirement for a 
doctorate in Mechanical Engineering. 



Alumnus Studies 

W. Virginian Industrial 

Re-development 

Subramaniam Moryadas, A&S '63, re- 
search associate in the Department of 
Geography, is now doing research to 
determine the best locations in West 
Virginia for industrial development and 
for the development of public facilities. 

While campaigning in West Virginia 
during the 1960 presidential primaries, 
the late President John F. Kennedy be- 
came concerned by the economically 
distressed conditions of numerous W. 
Va. communities. Following his elec- 
tion, Kennedy appointed a Presidential 
Task Force to review the problems of 
depressed areas and to suggest suitable 
legislation. This resulted in the Area 
Redevelopment Act. 

One of the fundamental ideas behind 
this Act is that it is better to bring jobs 
to the people than to expect people 
to move. Relocation of people has nu- 
merous inherent problems. Professional 
people can move long distances and 
easily adapt to new situations. However, 
the working class cannot migrate as 
easily. When they move, they face tech- 
nological changes and are rejected as 
unskilled laborers unable to meet new 
job requirements. Unable to find em- 
ployment they group together, settle in 
ghettos and give birth to slums. Using 
a limited budget to aid all depressed 
areas (over 1000 counties of the United 
States) little beyond maintaining an 
area's subsistence can be accomplished. 
After a four-year period of experience 
with the working of the program, the 
appropriate government agencies are 
now thinking of designating certain 
areas as "growth centers." 

Extra (bonus) assistance will be 
given to these centers and it is hoped 
that the benefits will pervade over the 
neighboring areas. Those areas that 
have grown in the recent past and ap- 
pear to have prospects for further 
growth will be designated as "growth 
centers." 

Moryadas hopes to determine the 
locations of these growth centers in 
W. Va. Using the concepts and oper- 




Mrs. Meriwether L. Roylance, Quince Orchard, Gaithersburg, turns over call letters 
W3FRZ along with amateur radio equipment and supplies to, left. Dave Dorn, President 
of the Amateur Radio Society, and Professor Kenneth Guy, Industrial Education Division. 



W3FRZ Stays on the Air 

Call letters W3FRZ originating at the 
University of Maryland in 1936 re- 
cently returned to the site of their in- 
ception when Mrs. M. L. Roylance, 
knowing the love her late husband had 
for his chosen hobby and the University 
of Maryland, presented major items of 
radio equipment to the Division of In- 
dustrial Education. 

Receiving the equipment on behalf of 
the University's Department of Educa- 
tion was Professor Kenneth Guy. Rep- 
resenting the University of Maryland 
Amateur Radio Group was Dave Crone, 
president. 

Items ranging from a single band 
transmitter and amplifier; a late model 
NC 303 receiver; a kilowatt CW trans- 
mitter and a 10 and 20 meter beam 
tower to microphones and "junk" boxes 
on which students can repair or con- 
struct additional equipment were among 
the valuable equipment Mrs. Roylance 



presented. Most of the equipment is 
presently housed and operating under 
University of Maryland Call letters 
W3EAX in the Amateur Radio Shack 
on campus, while other items are being 
utilized in the Industrial Education 
Laboratory. 

Roylance, who headed the Univer- 
sity's amateur radio society in 1936-37, 
continued his hobby until his death in 
October, and most of the equipment 
donated had been constructed by him 
in his home workshop. Long active in 
amateur radio circles, Mr. Roylance was 
president of the Potomac Valley Radio 
Club at the time of his death. 

Mr. Roylance had worked as an elec- 
trical engineer since 1939 in the Wash- 
ington area and at the time of his death 
was an engineer with the Electronics 
Division of the Bureau of Ships work- 
ing on satellite communications systems 
for the Navy. 



ational techniques of location theory 
and industrial location analysis, he plans 
to simultaneously determine growth cen- 
ters and specific possibilities for further 
growth in each of these centers. 

The desired form of conclusion is the 
identification of lists of inter-related 
industries that can be established as "in- 
dustrial parks" in several locations in 
West Virginia. 

Area redevelopment problems exist in 
many countries. West Virginia is a 
classic problem area containing most 
of the elements of depressed area prob- 
lems that exist also in other parts of 
the United States and Western Europe. 
By studying the problems and results 
of redevelopment programs in West 
Virginia the understanding of under- 
development in general becomes facili- 
tated. 

"We should not leave ghost towns 
throughout the state of West Virginia 



as was the situation in the wild west," 
insists Moryadas. "Area redevelopment 
can aid in the transformation from the 
would-be ghost towns into modern com- 
munities centered around industrial 
parks." 

"When jobs are brought to the people, 
entire situations and conditions change. 
Disposable income increases as people 
resume employment. Services and prod- 
ucts are made available to meet new 
demands. As a modernistic town is 
established, local levels of living rise." 

Area redevelopment can be one of 
the most valuable programs for domes- 
tic redevelopment and foreign aid pro- 
grams. Constructive criticism, however, 
can only be evaluated after sufficient 
funds are granted to propel the program. 

"We have studies," declares Morya- 
das, "we now need experiments to de- 
termine its success." gina ferraro 



18 



The Maryland Magazine 



Officer's Suggestion 
Achieves Saving of Jet 
Fuel Consumption 

A suggestion by a U. S. Air Force offi- 
cer from Fresno, Calif., Lieutenant 
Colonel Fay G. Adams, Mil. Sci. '55, 
is expected to save the Air Force more 
than one million dollars during fiscal 
year 1965. 

Colonel Adams, a KC-135 aircraft 
commander and an operations staff offi- 
cer at Moron AB, Spain, recommended 
the omission of a 15-minute "lapse" 
period allowed each flight for refueling 
operations. 

Original planners of KC-135 refuel- 
ing operations scheduled a 15-minute 
lapse to allow the aerial tanker to await 
the receiver aircraft and to permit devi- 
ations in the latter's flight plans. Colonel 
Adams suggested omitting the 15-min- 
ute orbit of the aircraft in the refueling 
area with a resultant savings of approxi- 
mately 500 gallons of jet aircraft fuel. 

Records kept by the Colonel showed 
that capabilities of Strategic Air Com- 
mand (SAC) aircraft to follow precise 
flight plans permitted the KC-135 
tankers to arrive consistently in the re- 
fueling area at the same time as the 
receiver aircraft. He observed opera- 
tions of the jet aerial tankers for more 
than a year to back up his million-dollar 
idea. 

A special Air Force team verified the 
fact that his suggestion would save 
more than $412,000 annually at Moron. 
Colonel Adams has been recommended 
for a substantial cash award through 
the Air Force military suggestion pro- 
gram. 

Colonel Adams has been at Moron 
since July 1962 and has been in SAC 
aerial tanker operations five years. 

Colonel Adams, a graduate of Te- 
hachapi, California, Valley Union High 
School, has B.S. and M.S. degrees from 
the University of Maryland. A veteran 
of more than 23 years' service, he was 
commissioned upon completion of the 
aviation cadet program in 1944 and 
served in North Africa during World 
War II. He has more than 1 1,000 hours 
of flying time in military aircraft. 



UNESCO Official Becomes 
University Administrator 

Fresh from the world of international 
diplomacy and global planning, Ralph 
W. Ruffner, Educ. '35, is back among 
his chosen people in the smaller world 
of a university community. 

The 50-year-old native of Washing- 
ton, D. C, is the new vice president for 
student affairs and area services at 
Southern Illinois University. It is a dual 
responsibility and involves two major 
campuses, but the versatile Ruffner is 




The O'Neill family. Standing left to right: Richard. Jr 
Theresa. Seated left to right: Patricia, 10; Laura, 6; 
Michael. 13. 



Mr 



Mary, l 
O'Neil 



<y. ( ol. O'Neill: and 
I: Doroths. (>: and 



Alumnus is Awarded the Legion of Merit 



Col. Richard James O'Neill, A&S '39, 
Secretary of the Infantry School, was 
recently awarded the legion of merit in 
ceremonies at Ft. Benning, Georgia. 

Col. O'Neill was cited for his work 
from September 1961 to July 1964. In 
successive assignments he was battle 
commander, 1st Battle Group; group 
commander, 4th Battle Group, 23rd 
Infantry; Commander, 172nd Infantry 
Brigade, Fort Richardson; and plans 
and operations officer, U. S. Army, 
Alaska. 

The citation commended the organ- 
izational work by Col. O'Neill which 
contributed to the success of Exercise 
"Great Bear," Exercise "Timber Line." 
and Joint Combined Exercise "Polar 
Siege." The citation included Col. 
O'Neill's work in directing the conver- 
sion of the U. S. Army Alaska to the 
ROAD ( Reorganization Objective Army 
Division) concept and his work in as- 
sisting the Anchorage. Alaska, com- 
munity after the recent earthquake. 

In previous overseas assignments. Col. 
O'Neill served in the British West Indies 



and Vietnam. He was commissioned in 
June 1939, upon completion of the 
ROTC program at Maryland. While at 
the University of Maryland, he was 
vice president of Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity, varsity manager of lacrosse 
and active in numerous campus activi- 
ties. He also holds an M.A. degree in 
1961 from George Washington Univer- 
sity, where he majored in international 
affairs. 

Mrs. O'Neill, nee Sophia Hoenes. is 
also a graduate of University ot Mary- 
land, Class of '38. She was a member 
of Alpha Omicron Pi and a Cheerleader. 
Their daughter Theresa ( Alaska's Junior 
Miss, 1962) is currently a sophomore 
in the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Besides Theresa. Col. and Mrs. O'Neill 
have six other prospective University 
enrollees — Richard Jr. 14. Mars 16, 
Michael 13, Patricia 10. 1 aura and 
Dorothy aged 6. 

Col. O'Neill currently is serving as 
the Administrative Executive tor the 
assistant commandant and chiet ol the 
Academic Staff for the Army's Inlanlrv 
School at Ft. Benning. 



accustomed to that. In his most recent 
assignment before joining Southern's 
executive staff he was the U. S. deputy 
permanent representative to UNESCO. 
in Paris, while at the same time serving 
as first secretary at the American Em- 
bassy there. 

Ruffner received his bachelor's degree 
in English and mathematics from the 
University of Maryland and his mas- 
ter's degree from George Washington 



University, in 1940. Holder ot an Armv 
Reserve commission, he "went on active 
dut\ for tWO weeks and got out si\ \e.iis 
later." 

After 42 months overseas, most ol it 
with the 5th lnfantrv Division. Ruffner 
came home with a bronze star, the 
Croix de Guerre and the rank ol lieu- 
tenant colonel. He now is retired from 
the Army Reserves 

Southern's new vice president ac- 



January -February, 1965 



19 



quired his doctorate at George Wash- 
ington University, rose to the academic 
rank of professor in 1952 and became 
assistant dean of education there in 
1 954. Two years later he accepted the 
first of a series of overseas appoint- 
ments which took him to India as chief 
educational officer for the U. S. foreign 
aid program and by 1959 he was direct- 
ing the worldwide education program 
of the International Cooperation Ad- 
ministration. Then followed the UNES- 
CO and State Department assignments 
in Paris. 

Ruffner first heard of Southern as a 
"fast growing, dynamic school," from 
a former ICA associate, Robert Jacobs, 
who joined the university staff in 1962 
as coordinator of international pro- 
grams. He was interviewed by a group 
of SIU officials and accepted the offer 
to return to campus life. "My wife was 
anxious to get back to the midwest and 
we both were ready to settle perma- 
nently," Ruffner said. "Our oldest girl 
had been in nine different schools in 
nine years." 

The Ruffners plan to locate in Ed- 
wardsville. He will maintain offices how- 
ever on both the Edwardsville and Car- 
bondale campuses and direct the activi- 
ties of his departments from either 
headquarters. Ruffner said he viewed his 
work as complementing the University's 
academic program, "which is the heart 
and core of any university." 

After three weeks on his new assign- 
ment, Ruffner said he was still primarily 
engaged in visiting the departments and 
offices under his command and "enjoy- 
ing the friendliness of the people of 
Southern Illinois." 



Incorporated 1847 

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eutaw and fayette streets 
5 Convenient Offices 

• 

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assets Over $110,000,000 



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Seven Receive 
Harvard Degrees 

Seven University of Maryland alumni 
received degrees from Harvard Univer- 
sity in Cambridge, Mass., recently: 
Charles F. Austin, UC '58 — Doctor of 

Business Administration 
Ross H. Beville, Jr., Engr. '62 — Master 

in Business Administration 
John A. Eichler, BPA '57 — Master of 

Law 
Brian A. Hazlett, A&S '61— Ph.D. 
Donald N. Streeter, Engr. '50— Ph.D. 
James Turnbull, Engr. '38 — Master of 

Public Administration 
June L. Walker — Master in Business 

Administration 
John W. Dorsey, BPA '58, Ph.D. 



Join 



Your 



Alumni 



Association 




The sculptor calls this "Mother Love" 
. . . and who can argue? At the very 
least, it's a forceful expression of origi- 
nal thought. Westinghouse-Baltimore 
isn't hiring sculptors these days, but we 
always need engineers, mathematicians 
and physicists with demonstrated ca- 
pacity for original thought — men who 
can think apace with the outstanding 
scientists already enrolled in Westing- 
house projects. 

For the exceptional man with the train- 
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the curiosity, here is the chance to 
participate in the great intellectual 
adventures of our time. 

Can you qualify? Tell us what you have 
to offer us in training and experience, 
we'll tell you what Westinghouse has 
to offer you. 

To arrange an interview call 

SOuthfield 1-1000, Ext. 510 or 860 

or send resume to: 

J. T. Porpf, Dept. 404 



. ..Westinghouse 

W J DEFENSE AND SPACE CENTER 




Aerospace 
Surface 
Systems 
Underseas 



BALTIMORE 

P.O. Box 1693 
Baltimore, Md. 21203 



An Equal Opportunity Employer 



20 



The Maryland Magazine 



Carroll County 
Agent Retires 



An alumnus who has often been called 
"Mr. Carroll County" retired August 
31 after 37 years with the Maryland 
Cooperative Extension Service. 

Landon C. Burns, Agr. '23, who has 
seen Carroll County turn from a purely 
agricultural countryside when he was 
appointed County Agent in 1927 to more 
and more urbanized community, will 
pass his guiding reins to other agricul- 
tural leaders at the end of the month. 

A Virginian by birth. Burns came to 
the University's College of Agriculture 
after one year at Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute, Blacksburg. He earned a B.S. 
degree in Agricultural Education and 
spent four years establishing Voca- 
tional Agricultural programs in the 
Thurmont and Emmitsburg High 
Schools in Frederick County. During 
these years, he attended Columbia Uni- 
versity earning a M. S. degree in Rural 
Sociology in 1927. 

Burns drew on his first 21 years of 
experience on a northwestern Virginia 
farm to develop programs for rural 
people. Under his leadership and guid- 
ance, local agricultural organizations 
planned and built the Carroll County 
Agricultural Center in 1954-55. When 
a match was put to the mortgage in 
March of 1961, Mr. Burns called it, "a 
dream fulfilled." 

Because of good working relation- 
ships with individuals and organizations 
in the county, Burns was able to spear- 
head a drive for "a place where farm 
meetings could be held." Three years 
of missionary work led to the purchase 
of a site and formation of a corporation 
to handle the business of designing and 
building. The center is now used regu- 
larly by agricultural, civic and 4-H 
groups. 

Believing that organized agriculture 
is the chief hope of the American farm- 
er, Burns was untiring in promoting 
agricultural industries in Carroll Coun- 
ty. He was particularly successful with 
winter meetings as a tool used to pro- 
mote a better cropping system to feed 
the large livestock population of the 
county, in establishing livestock testing 
programs, and in encouraging better 
soil and water conservation practices. 
His success with meetings, tours and 
demonstrations is based on careful 
planning and good working relation- 
ships with mass news media. 

Mr. and Mrs. Burns, who live at 
Westminster, are the parents of one 
son, Landon Jr., a Professor of English 
at the University of Pennsylvania. 



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WASHINGTON 21, D.C. 







January-February, 1965 



21 



Through 
The 

Years 



1920-1929 

James E. Dingman, Engr. '21, Ex- 
ecutive Vice President of A.T.&T., has 
been nominated by the company as 
candidate for election to the Board of 
Directors of the Communications Satel- 
lite Corporation. 

Mr. Dingman began his Bell System 
career with Western Electric Company 
in 1922 and held various managerial 
positions with Long Lines before be- 
coming Vice President of Bell of 
Pennsylvania in 1949. He later held 
executive posts with Bell Telephone Lab- 
oratories and Long Lines and in 1959 
was named Vice President and Chief 
Engineer of A.T.&T. Mr. Dingman be- 
came Executive Vice President in 1961. 

Mildred Wimer, Educ. '28 and a 
member of Kappa Kappa Gamma, is 
married to Capt. R. B. Heilig, U.S.N. 
(Ret.), a graduate of the U. S. Naval 
Academy, class of '31. 

The Heiligs are currently living in 
La Jolla, California, where they are in 
the brokerage business. 

The Drexel Institute of Technology 
Alumni Varsity Club honored Herman 
Epstein, A&S '29, with their annual 
award for service to Drexel athletics 
during halftime ceremonies at the 
Drexel-Penn Military College homecom- 
ing game, October 31. Epstein, an assist- 
ant football coach, head lacrosse coach 
and associate professor of physical edu- 
cation, has been connected with Drexel 
since 1947. 

Epstein is a nationally known lacrosse 
figure and fathered the sport at Drexel. 
The 5'6" Drexel tradition first played 
lacrosse in his native state of Maryland 
and starred in football and lacrosse as 
an undergraduate at the University of 
Maryland, where he also obtained a 
law degree. 

Epstein tutored football in Maryland 
high schools, was a line coach at Johns 
Hopkins University for four years, and 
was head freshman coach at Drexel for 
1 3 seasons before moving to the varsity 
four years ago. 

Ben Dyer, Engr. '29, president of 
Ben Dyer Associates, consulting engi- 
neers with offices in Riverdale, Mary- 
land, played host to the County Voca- 
tional education teachers during the 
recent Business-Education Day spon- 
sored jointly by the Prince Georges 
Chamber of Commerce and the County 
Board of Education. 

Mr. Dyer and one of his associates. 



Leslie A. Smith, Engr. '46, explained 
the role of private engineering and 
planning firms such as his in the growth 
and development of the County and 
the technical training required by var- 
ious departments of his firm, which 
employs nearly 100 persons. 

1930-1939 

Margaret (Cook) French, H.Ec. 
'31 and m.e. '43, has returned to the 
Washington Metropolitan area after an 
absence of 18 years. Last year she 
taught in Anne Arundel County at 
Andover High School and George Fox 
Junior High. 

Her daughter, Betsy, is a sophomore 
at Bucknell University, Pennsylvania, 
majoring in music; her son, Tom, is a 
freshman at Wesley College, Delaware, 
majoring in Business Administration. 

Robert C. Reeder, Jr., A&S '32, 
ll.b. '35, Westfield, New Jersey, has 
been named assistant vice president of 
Fireman's Fund American Insurance 
Companies. 

Reeder is attached to the company's 
Eastern Regional headquarters in New- 
ark. 

Reeder joined 
the company in 
1947 as assistant 
manager of bond 
and burglary in- 
surance in the 
New York office 
< -40^i I ar) d was named 
fl mA ^1 Eastern Depart- 

Ji w ^k \ 

flf r£ ^k burglary manager 

in 1957. He has 
been in the insurance business since 
1935, following his graduation from 
the University of Maryland law school. 
He is a member of the Casualty and 
Surety Club of New York and is a dis- 
trict committeeman of the Boy Scouts 
of America. 

Dr. Otto G. Matheke, Jr., A&S 
'34, m.d. med. '37, was a guest lecturer 
in surgery at the University of Bologna 
this past September. The Italian Univer- 
sity invited Dr. Matheke to lecture to 
the seniors of the Medical School who 
are planning to intern in American hos- 
pitals next year. Dr. Matheke resides 
in East Orange, New Jersey, and is a 
surgeon on the staff of Presbyterian 
Hospital and St. Michael's Hospital in 
Newark. 

Arthur H. Bryan, A&S '34, Major 
AUS retired, after an European tour of 
England, France and Germany, returned 
to the U.S.A. to accept a position as 
Head Science Department, National Air 
Space Academy, Avon Park, Florida. 

Major Bryan has published his 100th 
science and education article. He would 
like to contact any Maryland Alumni 
in Florida. 

He taught in the School of Pharmacy, 
University of Maryland, Baltimore, as 




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Headquarters for 

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• JEWELRY 

• STATIONERY 



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22 



The Maryland Magazine 



Assistant Professor of Bacteriology and 
Public Health. 

Charles H. Berry, Engr. '34, re- 
cently returned to the Washington Met- 
ropolitan area as vice president of Gen- 
eral Precision, Inc. 

Dr. Raymond L. McCarthy, A&S 
'37 & ph.d. '41, was named director of 
the Du Pont "Freon" Products Lab- 
oratory, succeeding Dr. Joseph S. Lann. 
The "Freon" Products Division mar- 
kets "Freon" compounds for use as 
refrigerants, aerosol propellents, fluoro 
solvents, blowing agents for urethanc 
foams, dielectric gases, fire extinguish- 
ing agents and numerous specialty appli- 
cations, including several in the space 
program. 

Dr. McCarthy joined Du Pont in 
1948, shortly after receiving his doc- 
torate in physics from Yale University. 
He was assistant director of the "Freon" 
Products Laboratory at the time of his 
new appointment. Dr. Lann has been 
in research work with Du Pont since 
1946 and had been director of the 
"Freon" Products Laboratory since 
1954. He received his doctorate in 
organic chemistry from the University 
of Maryland in 1941, Ph.D. & A&S '37. 
Robert J. McLeod, Engr. '37, chief 
engineer of the Washington Suburban 
Sanitary Commission, is author of an 
article on "Methods of Personnel Re- 
cruitment and Selection," which is fea- 
tured in the current issue of the Amer- 
ican Water Works Association Journal. 
The publication, which is distributed 
to water utility executives throughout 
the Nation, this month offer a series of 
articles on personnel management. 

"The strength of any organization is 
directly related to its personnel," Mr. 
McLeod tells AWWA members. "The 
water utility executives of today are the 
applicants of yesterday, and the appli- 
cants of today are the basis for a suc- 
cessful operation tomorrow." 

Mr. McLeod discusses in detail the 
WSSC's continuing effort to acquire and 
retain capable personnel through pro- 
grams of recruitment, evaluation, selec- 
tion and classification. 

"When employers realize the value 
of a sound selection and procurement 
program and develop employment pro- 
cedures to make the best possible use 
of human resources," Mr. McLeod con- 
cluded, "they will reap such rewards 
as more efficient performance and re- 
duced turnover, along with the resulting 
financial benefits to the organization." 
David L. Brigham, A&S '38, mod- 
erator of the interfaith television pro- 
gram, "To Promote Good Will." last 
month won the annual Golden Deeds 
Award of the Exchange Club of Balti- 
more. Mr. Brigham is assistant vice 
president, First National Bank of Mary- 
land, Rockville. 

Others who have won the award in- 
clude Charles P. McCormick, chairman 
of the Board of Regents, and Walter 

January-February, J 965 



Sondheim, Jr., director. Provident S 
ings Bank and the First National Bank 
of Maryland, Baltimore, 

Brigham has also been elected presi 
dent of the Maryland Society foi ( rip- 
pled Children and Adults. Formerly 
treasurer of the society, he served as a 
hoard member of the organization since 
1961 and was chairman ol the building 
fund campaign for the new headquar- 
ters building and treatment center ol 
the association in Brooklyn. 

John D. Munc ks, Engr. '39, has been 
elected to the Board of Directors ol 
Charles H. Tompkins Co., Washington. 
D. C. contracting firm. Johnny is a vice 
president of Tompkins. While at the 
University, he was the President of the 
Student Government Association and a 
member of Omicron Delta Kappa ami 
Phi Delta Theta. His wife is the former 
Sallie Vaiden, A&S '40. 

Paula Nalley Snyder, H.Ec. '39, 
home economist with Colonial Baking 
Company, has recently joined the Wash- 
ington Milling Company staff as home 
economist. She is currently serving as 
secretary of the Alumni Board. 

Dr. John H. Weinberger, ph.d. '39, 
U. S. Department of Agriculture, horti- 
culturist at Fresno, California, was 
awarded the Department's Superior 
Service Award. 

Secretary of Agriculture Orville L. 
Freeman, in making the award, noted 
that Dr. Weinberger has had remark- 
able success in developing varieties of 
peaches and other stone fruits with su- 
perior qualities. 



Ti mnm i mmmn i mmmm, 

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Baltimore, Md. 
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Dr w einbergei has origii 
industry accepted 

any othei breedei a fact t hich I • led 
to iiis recognition a M P 
his colleagues .nut the peach ind 
His new peach varieties, introduced 
i si ) \ \ ] icultural Rese irch S 
have almost replaced formei vai 
grown both in the Southeast .md in 
( alifornia and are gaining widi 
ance in British ( olumbia vv > ashii 
State, ami othei producing areas 

As a result ol I )i \\ einl I 

efforts, the peach industry in tin South- 
east has virtually changed from one 
supplying low-quality, white-fleshed 
peaches to one providing firm, h 

qualit) peaches with the more ,,ttr. 

yellow llesh. In California, new | 
stone varieties have emphasized high 
quality ami firmness. 

Dr. Weinberger also was cited foi 

his recent work m breeding high-quality 

apricot ami plum varieties, and lor de- 
veloping a nemaIode-resist.ini peach 

which ser\es as rootstock loi almond, 

plum, and apricot as well as peach 
varieties. 

Dr. Weinberger began his I Sl)\ 
career as an assistant pomologist in 

193 1, working in the Washington, D. i 

area. In 1937. he was assigned lo I t 
Valley. Georgia, where he worked until 
his transfer to Fresno in 1954. 

Dr. Weinberger is a member ol the 
American Institute of Biological Science 
and the American Society tor Horti- 
cultural Science. 



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1940-1949 



Ten career officers representing the 
Army. Navy, Marines and Air Force 
are among 69 cited by their alma maters 
as candidates for this year's Sports Illu- 
strated Silver Anniversary All-American 
\uard>. Nominated on the basis of their 
success in life in the 25 years since their 
senior collegiate gridiron days, the can- 
didates from the 1939-40 season com- 
prise a slate which sparkles with exciting 
football memories as well as an im- 
pressive record of career and community 
service achievement. 

Maryland's candidate is Colonel 
Francis X. Beamer, BPA '40, nomi- 
nated by the University of Maryland, 
lettered in football in 1938 and '39. 
Winner of the Bronze Star with combat 
"V" for action on Tarawa, he rose 
steadily through various commands to 
his present position as Marine Corps 
liaison officer to the Naval Inspector 
General in Washington. He has been 
a battalion commander at Camp Le- 
jeune, commanding officer of the Ma- 
rine Barracks in Boston and assistant 
director of the Marine Corps Reserve. 

The final selection of the annual roster 
is made by a panel of distinguished citi- 
zens, and announcement of the 25 win- 
ners will be made by the magazine in 
late November. This award is unique, 
however, in that nomination alone is 
regarded as a special honor, since col- 
leges and universities do not nominate 
in a year when they do not have a candi- 
date they deem to be of winning caliber. 

Howard H. Fawcett, A&S '40, re- 
cently assumed the position of technical 
secretary of a committee on hazardous 
materials recently established within 
the National Academy of Sciences Na- 
tional Research Council. 

Fawcett, a native of Cumberland, 
Maryland, received his bachelor's de- 
gree from the University of Maryland 
and pursued graduate studies at the 
University of Delaware. He was a re- 
search and devel- 
opment chemist 
at E. I. duPont 
before joining the 
General Electric 
Research Labora- 
tory in 1948. He 
has directed the 
safety activities 
of the Laboratory 
since that time, 
has been the au- 
thor of numerous papers, and has been 
active in the American Chemical So- 
ciety, the National Safety Council, and 
a variety of other organizations, national 
and local. He is the co-editor and one 
of the authors of a book, Safety and 
Accident Prevention in Chemical Oper- 
ations, scheduled for January 1965 
publication. 




In his new position, Fawcett will 
expedite interaction between the United 
States Coast Guard and a committee of 
industrial and university scientists study- 
ing the problems of shipping hazardous 
materials. The committee was estab- 
lished this year at the request of the 
Coast Guard. 

East Carolina College at Greenville, 
North Carolina, recently announced the 
promotion to full professor of Dr. 
Oscar K. Moore, m.s. '41. Dr. Moore 
is a native of Marianna, Florida. 

Miss Margaret T. Loar, H.Ec. '41, 
received a citation in her College Park 
office from Mr. Ormond Galvin, Mary- 
land's savings bond division director, 
U. S. Treasury Department, Baltimore, 
for encouraging Homemakers Clubs to 
initiate bond-buying programs. 

Miss Loar is advisor to the Maryland 
State Council of Homemakers' Clubs, 
which works with extension home econ- 
omists in every county and Baltimore 
City on consumer, family, and com- 
munity problems. 

Leonard F. Williams, Engr. '43, 
recently completed the Nuclear Plant 
Engineer Course at the Nuclear Power 
Field (NPFO), Fort Belvoir, Virginia. 
The six-week course is designed to 
provide the student with a general orien- 
tation with the 
Army Nuclear 
Power Program, 
and a familiariza- 
tion with a typical 
military nuclear 
power plant and 
the technical sup- 
port required in 
W. ^M the operation of 

M'2 JA "" • I slJ ch plants. 

A Bachelor of 
either nuclear, me- 
electronics, civil or 
chemical engineering, or a degree in 
mathematics, physics or chemistry is 
required in order to enroll for the 
course. Williams has been employed in 
the Engineering Department of Nuclear 
Power Field Office since last June. 

William H. Pomeroy, Med. '43, in 
addition to conducting a most successful 
general practice of medicine in Poquo- 
nock, Connecticut, since 1947, has been 
recognized in Who's Who in the East 
for his numerous civic and professional 
activities. 

During promotion ceremonies at XXI 
U. S. Corps Headquarters at Indian- 
town Gap Military Reservation, Pennsyl- 
vania, Brig. Gen. Harry J. Mier, Jr., 
Educ. '43, received the silver star of 
his new rank from Maj. Gen. Van H. 
Bond, commanding general of the XXI 
Corps. 

General Mier commands the 157th 
Infantry Brigade, a major combat-type 
organization and the largest non-divis- 
ional unit comprising about 4,200 res- 





Science degree in 
chanical, electrical. 



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24 



The Maryland Magazine 



ervists from the central and eastern parts 
of Pennsylvania. 

While at the University of Maryland, 
Harry Mier played half-hack for the 
Terrapins. 

Wilson R. Toui a. ll.b. '47, who 
lives in Baltimore County, is affiliated 
with the Social Security Administration 
as a social insurance court action spe- 
cialist, Division of Disability Opera- 
tions. Mr. Toula was vice chancellor, 
Gamma Eta Gamma at the University 
in 1947. 

Nostalgic reminiscences of College 
Park Campus days received from Barb- 
ara Skinner, A&S '47, (Mrs. Dudley 
M. Bradford). Barbara's husband, who 
is affiliated with ACF Industries, Inc., 
has been transferred from Stamford, 
Connecticut, to St. Charles, Missouri. 

Richard E. Bangham, Engr. '49, has 
been named manager of the Washington 
D. C, district for Ceco Steel Products 
Corporation. 

Bangham, a civil engineer, joined 
Ceco's engineering department at Wash- 
ington in 1948, 
and a year later 
^■PT^k. was appointed 

sales engineer. 
After serving as 
manager of Balti- 
more and Char- 
lotte offices, he 
was appointed as- 
sistant manager 
of the firm's 
Washington dis- 
trict in 1960. 
Bangham and his wife, Leona, reside 
in Silver Spring, Maryland. They have 
four children, Richard, Jr., 15, Mar- 
garet, 13, William, 11 and Robert, 1. 

Robert E. Galloway, m.a. '48, who 
has been serving overseas as an advisor 
with the Agency for International De- 
velopment, returned to the United States 
from Iran for home leave in December. 
Galloway, a community development 
specialist, has been in Iran for the past 
four years. Previously, he served with 
the foreign aid program in Jordan for 
five years. 

In Iran, Galloway advised and assisted 
the Ministry of Interior and Social Af- 
fairs and com- 
^^■k munity develop- 

40 r% ment officials in 

r fS- J i a nation-wide 

community devel- 
opment program. 
The main objec- 
, ( . tive of the pro- 

^ t| $ gram was to meet 
M EM mi the needs of Iran's 

• MUSm.,mm rura ' population 
for economic, so- 
cial and political development. 

While in Iran he served on the Emer- 
gency Relief Distribution Committee, 
aided the Food for Work Program, 
served on the American Youth Com- 
mittee, and was the Agency for Inter- 




national Development's Representative 
on the feeder Road ( entral < ommittee. 
Ru i'ii A. May, A&S '49, has 

elected to the hoard ot directors ol 
Thalhimer Brothers. Inc. Ralph is pi 

dent of the Ram Construction ( orp ol 
Richmond and Miami, which he estab 

lished in 1954. He and his wife, the 

former Faye Naviasky ol Baltimore, 

and their three daughters live in Miami 
Beach, Florida. 



1950-1959 

Edgar H. Far- 

01^^^^^, who has 

I » on Ihc Detroil 

W — ► U Sales Staff ol 

f' Time magazine, 

J stepped up recent- 

A^^ ly to manager ol 
M ^ the 
^fl Mr. Farrell joined 

^g\ I ime's New York 

advertising sales 
staff in 1952. 
Major Wii liam A. Ginn, Mil. Sci. 
'50, son of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur R. 
Ginn of 4215 Russell Ave., Mount 
Rainier, is now on duty with the U. S. 
Air Force's famed, six-time decorated 
8th Tactical Fighter Wing at George 
AFB, California. 

Major Ginn's new unit was originally 
activated in 1923 and became famous 
while flying award-winning combat mis- 
sions over the Pacific, Philippines and 



Korea during two wars I 
vn in | equipped with thi 

fastest jel fighter, th i U P 

fhe majoi is a logistics staff officer 
with , which 20 . aftei ii 

supported ground fora on I u 
will continue to provide Hi 
t s \ini\ troops .is pari ol th< I 
tical An ( ommand 

( HARI I s I) Mi ,.in S BP \ I. will 

direcl the management ol commercial 
property foi Walket & Dunli , i 
Previously with the ITiomas I I 
( o as vice president foi propert) man 
agement, he formerly served foi 
years with the property management 
department ot 1 1 ( , Smithy < o 
R. kiwi i ii Barm s, I due 
M.Educ, '51, has been appointed \ssisi- 
anl State Superintendent foi Vocational 
Rehabilitation by the Maryland State 
Bo, ud ol Education. Mr, Barnes, cur- 
rently ( hiel ot the Division ol Admin 
istration and Finance foi the Dej 



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January-February, 1965 



25 



ment of Mental Hygiene, will replace 
Dr. Robert C. Thompson, who is retir- 
ing from the State Department of Edu- 
cation. 

From 1941-1946 Mr. Barnes served 
in the United States Army, holding the 
rank of major when he was released 
from active duty. In June of 1946 Mr. 
Barnes joined the Maryland State De- 
partment of Education as a vocational 
rehabilitation counselor. He served in 
this capacity until 1951 when he be- 
came Director of Rehabilitation in the 
Maryland State Department of Mental 
Hygiene. In 1954 he became Director of 
Personnel for that department. After 
holding this position for one year he 
became Assistant Superintendent of 
Spring Grove Hospital in Catonsville. 
He held this position until 1960 when 
he was elevated to his present position. 

Mr. Barnes has currently completed 
60 to 90 post-graduate hours leading to 
Ph.D. at the University of Maryland. 

Major Harold B. Coffee, BPA '52, 
has been decorated with the U. S. Air 
Force Commendation Medal at Barks- 
dale AFB. Louisiana. 

Major Coffee was awarded the medal 
for meritorious service as an operations 
staff officer while serving at Altus AFB, 
Oklahoma. 

The major was commissioned in 1944 
upon completion of aviation cadet train- 
ing. 

A graduate of The Western High 
School in Washington, D. C, he is a 
member of Alpha Tau Omega. 

Dr. Richard A. Kalish, m.a., A&S 
'54, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
at California State College at Los Ange- 
les, will have his 400-item bibliography 
published in the winter issue of the 
Journal of Human Relations. 

Dr. Kalish has written a number of 
articles, including "Dealing with the 
Grieving Family," in RN Magazine, and 
"An Approach to Death Attitudes," 
published in American Behavioral Sci- 
entist. He also has three articles in 
progress, including "The Changing Face 
of Death," scheduled for publication in 
North American Review. 

Dr. Kalish received his B.A. from 
Antioch College, Yellow Springs, Ohio, 
his M.A. from the University of Mary- 
land, College Park, and his Ph.D. from 
Western Reserve University, Cleveland. 

Captain William R. Kenty, A&S 
'54, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Y. 
Kenty of 4810 Osage St., College Park, 
Maryland, was among U. S. Pacific Air 
Forces (PACAF) personnel who par- 
ticipated in Exercise Sky Soldier/Tien 
Bing VI, a joint U.S.-Republic of China 
training maneuver in central Formosa. 

Captain Kenty is a F-100 fighter pilot 
temporarily assigned to Misawa AB, 
Japan. 

The captain, a graduate of Towson 
High School, earned his B.A. degree 
at the University of Maryland and was 
commissioned there through the Reserve 

26 



Officer Training Corps program. He is 
a member of Sigma Chi. 

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas H. 
McGuigan, Mil. Sci. "55, has completed 
the U. S. Air Force special training 
course for combat aircrew members at 
Castle AFB, California. 

Colonel McGuigan, an education and 
training officer, is a graduate of Free- 
port, New York, High School. He at- 
tended the University of Maryland and 
the University of North Dakota. The 
colonel has a B.S. degree and was com- 
missioned through the aviation cadet 
program. His wife is the former Martha 
L. Marquette. 

Helen A. Rowe, m.s. in Educ. '55, 
home demonstration agent of Middlesex 
County, Virginia, has been appointed 
extension district home demonstration 
agent for the northeast district of Vir- 
ginia, which includes 18 counties and 
the cities of Hampton and Newport 
News. She will make her headquarters 
in Richmond, Virginia. 

Miss Nila LaDuke became the bride 
of Edgar Hamilton Falun III, Engr. 
'56, in a November wedding. While at 
the University of Maryland, Fallin was 
affiliated with Lambda Chi Alpha. Cur- 
rently he is doing research work at 
UCLA. 

John D. Dillon, Mil. Sci. '56, re- 
cently was awarded first prize in an ad- 
vertising photography contest in Eng- 
land in competition with over 3,000 
contestants. John has established his 
own photography company in Middle- 
sex, England, and features American, 
as well as Continental, techniques. He 
is a member of Professional Photogra- 
phers of America, Inc. John is married 
to the former Alison Falconer, who lec- 
tures in mathematics at the University 



of Maryland evening program in the 
London area. They have three children. 

Captain Willard R. Mumford, 
Educ. '56, son of retired Navy Com- 
mander and Mrs. Edgar R. Mumford of 
Rt. 1, Annapolis, has been assigned to 
Cannon AFB, New Mexico, for duty 
as a navigator. 

Captain Mumford previously was as- 
signed to Southern Methodist Univer- 
sity in Dallas, Texas, where he com- 
pleted requirements for a B.S. degree 
in mechanical engineering under the 
U. S. Air Force Institute of Technology 
program. 

A graduate of Annapolis High School, 
the captain was commissioned upon 
completion of the Reserve Officer Train- 
ing Corps program at the University of 
Maryland and received a B.S. degree. 
He is a member of Phi Kappa Sigma. 

His wife, Elaine, is also a Maryland 
Graduate in Educ. '56. 

Martin J. Goldberg, A&S '57, after 
leaving Maryland, graduated with hon- 
ors from Howard Dental School and 
entered the USAF, where he served for 
two years. Dr. Goldberg presently has 
offices in Kensington, Maryland, and 
The Roosevelt Hotel, Washington, D. C. 

While in dental school, Dr. Goldberg 
received NIH Grant for work on 
steroids and cortisone. 

He is Vice President of ETA and 
serves on the Executive Board of Alpha 
Omega Dental Fraternity. 

Dr. Goldberg's wife, the former 
Gloria Sue Wolf, is a Maryland grad- 
uate, B.S. '59. 

Colonel Murray W. Cole, Mil Sci. 
'58, son of Mrs. Branda Q. Cole of 
1425 11th St., Greeley, Colorado, has 
retired from the U. S. Air Force at 
Vandenberg AFB, California, after 



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22 Vi years' service. 

Colonel Cole served with a Strategic 
Air Command unit at Vandenberg prior 
to his retirement. 

The colonel, a graduate of Greeley 
High School, earned his B.S. degree at 
the University of Maryland. He entered 
the service in March 1942 and received 
his commission through the aviation 
cadet program. During World War II 
he served in the European Theater of 
Operations. 

Lieutenant Colonel William W. 
Tomlinson, B.s.-UC '58, M.A.-BPA 
'63, son of Mrs. Margaret Tomlinson 
of 724 S. Halsey Rd., Dover, Delaware, 
has arrived to assume the position as 
chief of the systems management branch 
at Headquarters, Military Air Transport 
Service (MATS) at Scott AFB, 111. 
Colonel Tomlinson served at Izmir, 
Turkey, prior to his appointment at 
Scott. His new unit supports the MATS 
mission of providing global airlift oi 
U. S. military forces and equipment. 

A graduate of Dover High School, 
he attended the University of Delaware. 
He received B.S. and M.A. degrees 
from the University of Maryland in 
College Park. Colonel Tomlinson is a 
member of Theta Chi. 

Lieutenant Colonel Harold E. 
Howard, CSCS '59, participated in 
Operation Ayacucho, a military training 
exercise involving seven nations of the 
Western Hemisphere conducted near 
Lima, Peru, in December. 

Colonel Howard is assigned perma- 
nently to the Tactical Air Command's 
(TAC) Nineteenth Air Force with 
headquarters at Seymour Johnson AFB, 
North Carolina. TAC is providing troop 
carrier and reconnaissance aircraft as 
the air strike component of U. S. Strike 
Command forces participating in the 
exercise. 

In addition to Peru, Latin American 
nations taking part in the three-day de- 
fense exercise include Argentina, Boliva, 
Colombia, Paraguay and Venezuela. 

Colonel Howard, a graduate of Lake 
Side High School, Lake Village, Arkan- 
sas, received his B.S. degree from the 
University of Maryland. Commissioned 
by direct appointment in 1942, he 
served in the China-Burma-India The- 
ater of Operations during World War II. 

George G. Robbins, BPA '59, has 
been appointed to the position of hos- 
pital representative for McNeil Lab- 
oratories, Inc., in the Washington, D. C, 
area. 

Mr. Robbins joined McNeil in 1963 
as a professional service representative 
in the Washington, D. C. area. Prior 
to that time he was engaged in sales 
work in the prescription drug industry 
for two years. 

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Lieutenant Colonel Ellis B. Mc- 
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promotion to the rank of colonel in the 
U. S. Air Force. 

Colonel McClintick is an aircraft 
maintenance staff officer with a Stra- 
tegic Air Command SAC unit at Ells- 
worth AFB. His wing supports the SAC 
mission of keeping the nation's inter- 
continental missiles and jet bombers on 
constant alert. 

The Colonel was commissioned in 
1943 through the aviation cadet pro- 
gram. 

A graduate of Walnut High School, 
he received a B.S. degree in 1960 from 
the University of Maryland. His wife 
is the former Rhoda E. Enslow of 
Canada. 

Lieutenant ColonelAmin George, 
Jr., UC '60, has assumed the position 
as a faculty member at the Air Uni- 
versity's (AU) Squadron Officer School 
at Maxwell AFB, Alabama. 

Colonel George, a military training 
instructor, has been assigned to the Air 
War College, also at Maxwell. His new 
unit is part of the AU which conducts 
the professional military education pro- 
gram for U. S. Air Force personnel. 

The 21 -year service veteran was com- 
missioned upon completion of aviation 
cadet training. 

Colonel George is a graduate of 
Thomas Jefferson High School. He at- 
tended Lamar Junior College in Beau- 
mont, Texas, Texas A. & M. College, 
the University of Maryland and George 
Washington University in Washington, 
D. C. He has B.S. and M.A. degrees in 
international affairs. 

Nils William Larsen, BPA '60, 
who was separated from the Air Force 
recently, has accepted a position with 
the United States Steel Corporation as 
an accountant at their Gary Steel Works 
in Gary, Indiana. 

Jackie Spencer, A&S '60, is cur- 
rently an assistant instructor in the De- 
partment of English at Ohio State Uni- 
versity, where she received her M.A. 

First Lieutenant Paul A. Roberts, 
BPA '61, Transportation Officer, DCS/ 
Materiel, Fifth Air Force Reserve Re- 
gion, has received his appointment as 
a regular officer in the U. S. Air Force. 

He is a native of Greenbelt, the son 
of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne A. Roberts, 
37E Ridge Road. 

Lieutenant Roberts was graduated 
from the University of Maryland in 
1961 with a B.S. degree in business ad- 
ministration, majoring in transportation. 

He entered the service in August of 
1961. 

His assignments have included Com- 
mander of Det. 5, 8th Aerial Port Sq., 
Bien Hoa, Viet Nam, and a tour with 
the Fifth Air Force Reserve Region in 
August 1964. 

Lieutenant Roberts began a 14-week 
Squadron Officers School course at Air 
University, Maxwell AFB, Alabama, on 
January 6, 1965. 

Colonel Luther G. Jones, Jr., UC 



'61, has been named Director of Main- 
tenance with the Army Transportation 
Material Command (AVCOM), St. 
Louis. 

He arrived here following graduation 
from Army flight training at Fort Wol- 
ters, Texas, where he received his wings 
as a helicopter pilot. He had earned his 
wings in conventional aircraft prior to 
attending helicopter training. 

Col. Jones attended the University of 
Maryland, College Park, where he re- 
ceived a B.S. degree in military science 
in 1961. In 1963, he received an M.A. 
degree in international affairs from 
George Washington University, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Barry Edward Tossman, Engr. '61, 
received his M.S. degree in mechanical 
engineering during the University of 
Maryland June 6 commencement exer- 
cises held at College Park, Maryland. 

Donald Chaikin, b.a. '61, and an 
honors graduate from American Univer- 
sity Law School in '61, is a partner in 
the law firm, Lawson, Chaikin, Nesbit 
and Reynolds in Washington, D. C. 
Chaikin is president of ETA. 

Claudia Brush, H.Ec. '62, is now 
employed with the Historical Textiles 
Division of the Smithsonian Institute 
in Washington, D. C. She received her 
Master of Science degree from Pennsyl- 
vania State University this past summer. 

Second Lieutenant Michael A. 
Taylor, A&S '62, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley N. Taylor of 12902 Goodhill 
Road, Silver Spring, Maryland, has 
entered U. S. Air Force navigator train- 
ing at James Connally AFB, Texas. 

Lieutenant Taylor will receive radar 
and celestial navigation training lead- 
ing to the award of silver navigator 
wings upon graduation. The year-long 
course is conducted by the Air Training 
Command which trains officers and 
airmen in the diverse skills required by 
the nation's aerospace force. 

Lt. Taylor is a graduate of Wheaton 
High School, and earned his B.A. de- 
gree at the University of Maryland. He 
received his commission in 1964 upon 
completion of the Officer Training 
School. 

Drums Unlimited of Bethesda has 
announced the appointment of James 
C. Mathews, BPA '63, as sales man- 
ager in charge of educational, govern- 
mental and military sales. 

U. S. Air Force silver pilot wings 
have been awarded to Second Lieuten- 
ants Lawrence C. Denson, Educ. '63; 
Hiller P. McCartin, Jr., Engr. '63; 
and Lloyd D. Sullivan, Engr. '63. 
Second Lieutenant Thomas J. Fan- 
taski, Jr., A&S '63, has received his 
wings as a navigator and Second Lieu- 
tenant Stephen A. Leishman, BPA 
'64, currently is receiving radar and 
celestial navigation training which will 
lead to navigator wings upon graduation. 

Alumni receiving commissions as sec- 
ond lieutenants upon graduation from 



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The Maryland Magazine 






Officer Training School at Lackland 
AFB, Texas, include James F. Carlson, 
BPA '64, David T. Dorn, BPA '64, 
John L. Eavey, A&S '64, Robert B. 
Leadbetter, Jr., Engr. '64, and Barry 
P. Sklar, BPA '64. 

Gail Owings, H.Ec. '64, joined the 
home economics staff of the Potomac 
Electric Power Company in October. 

Sylvia Eckharot, m.s. '64, has ac- 
cepted a home economics position in 
the Woodrow Wilson High School, Dis- 
trict of Columbia. 

Terry Etienne, H.Ec. '64, became 
the bride of John Buchanan on October 
10. She is the daughter of an alumna of 
the College, Elinor Broughton, H.Ec. 
'38. 

Sixteen of the 1964 journalism and 
public relations graduates at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland have taken jobs 
in their professional field. 

Edward G. Banks, BPA '64, of 
Salisbury is writing articles for the pub- 
lic affairs section of the Maryland State 
Department of Forests and Parks. 

Charles Martin Berry, of Silver 
Spring, BPA '64, is doing public rela- 
tions work for GEICO Insurance Com- 
pany of Washington, D. C, as assistant 
to the director of field activities. 

Howard Blackburn, BPA '64, of 
Cumberland, is copy reading for the 
Cumberland Evening Times. 

Barry Lee Collier, BPA '64, of 
Great Neck, N. Y., is director of public 
relations at the World's Fair Transpor- 
tation and Travel Pavilion. 

Angelo A. Floria, BPA '64, is a 
technical manuals writer for the U. S. 
Naval Ordnance Laboratory. He is 
from Silver Spring. 

Martin Gorewitz, BPA '64, of 
Washington, D. C, is assistant editor 
of the Qualified Contractor Magazine 
for the National Electrical Contractors 
Association. 

Linda Hannemann, BPA '64, of Ta- 
koma Park, is doing advertising layout 
for the Evening Star of Washington, 
D. C. 

Steven Haas, BPA '64 is a police 
reporter for the Waterbury (Conn.) 
Republican. Mr. Haas is from Nauga- 
tuck, Connecticut. 

Carmine R. Iannacone of Westport, 
Connecticut, BPA '64, is Director of 
Public Relations for Williamsport, 
Pennsylvania, Chamber of Commerce. 

Garnette S. Jones, BPA '64, of 
Bethesda, is the Garden Club Editor of 
the Pittsburgh (Pa.) Press, a Scripps- 
Howard publication. 

Donnalee Judd, BPA '64, of Hyatts- 
ville, is editing copy for the News- 
American of Baltimore. 

Jon M. Karr, BPA '64, of Chillum, 
is with the public information office of 
NASA. 

Emory K. Kristoff, BPA '64, is a 
staff photographer for the National Geo- 
graphic magazine. He is from Wash- 
ington, D. C. 



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January-February, 1965 



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Harry R. Potts, of Winchester, Vir- 
ginia, is employed by the Information 
Office at the University of Nebraska, 
Lincoln, Nebraska. 

Patricia J. Reed, BPA '64, of Hyatts- 
viile. is a writer for Conde Nast Publi- 
cation of Washington, D. C. 

Herbert S. Spector. BPA '64, is 
doing public relations work for the 
Spector Candy Co. of Baltimore. 

Sally A. Stewart, BPA '64, of Sil- 
ver Spring, is doing publicity work for 
George Washington University, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Harvey Mogul, A&S '64, is currently 
serving as a Peace Corps Volunteer in 
the Philippines. Mogul works with Fili- 
pino teachers to improve the quality of 
teaching and the curricula in math, 
science and English in the elementary 
schools. 

Before going to the Philippines, he 
completed two weeks of camp training 
in Hawaii. Previously he spent eight 
weeks at Northern Illinois University, 
studying the history and culture of the 
Philippines, Far Eastern affairs, Amer- 
ican history, and modern teaching 
methods. 

George Wagner, A&S '64, left for 
India on December 1 as a Peace Corps 
Volunteer. He will participate in a 
poultry and swine development program 
in Bihar and Uttar Pradesh, provinces 
in northeastern India. 

With over 400 million people to feed, 
India is most concerned with improv- 
ing farm tech- 
^^^^^ niques and ex- 

j 0P ^*\ panding the yields 

\ of crops and live- 

f|| <•** stock. Over half 

C of the approxi- 

v-T^ mately 270 Peace 

JL Corps Volunteers 

^^^^-*s*r- serving 

^fl ^L-^^k India engaged 

lUk^H in agricultural 

work. 

Wagner trained for 1 2 weeks at Ore- 
gon State University at Corvallis, Ore- 
gon, where he received intensive train- 
ing in Hindi, the language of north- 
eastern India. He also studied the history 
and culture of India, United States his- 
tory and world affairs. 

Captain Thomas F. Tapman, UC 
'64, has arrived with his unit for a 
temporary duty tour at Misawa AB, 
Japan, a Pacific Air Forces installation. 

The captain is a graduate of Rosebud 
High School. He received his commis- 
sion through the aviation cadet pro- 
gram. Upon completion of the rota- 
tional tour, Captain Tapman will return 
to his home base at Cannon AFB, New 
Mexico. 

Gil i and W. Corbitt, UC '64, is 
currently assigned in the Plans Section 
of the Headquarters, based at Langley 
Air Force Base, Virginia. 



In Memoriam 

Herschel H. Allen, Sr., Engr. '10, 
who supervised the design of the Chesa- 
peake Bay Bridge, Baltimore Harbor 
Tunnel and some major Eastern toll 
roads, died December 6 of a heart at- 
tack. He was 74. 

A nationally recognized engineer and 
specialist in bridge design, he was senior 
partner in the Baltimore firm of J. E. 
Greiner Company for twenty years un- 
til retiring in 1962. 

Following his retirement from the 
consulting engineer firm, he had been 
active as a senior consultant to the 
company. 

The four major water toll facilities 
in Maryland trace their origins to Mr. 
Allen, known as "Major" among asso- 
ciates because of his World War I 
service. 

In 1938 he prepared the "Maryland 
Primary Bridge Report" for the State 
Roads Commission, in which he recom- 
mended the construction of the Potomac 
and Susquehanna River bridges, the Bay 
Bridge and the Harbor Tunnel. 

Not only did this report suggest the 
location of the four toll facilities, which 
his firm designed, it put forth the method 
by which they were financed. 

An early proponent of the revenue- 
bond financing method, wherein tolls 
are applied against the construction and 
operation costs, Mr. Allen's ideas for 
the Maryland facilities were also adopted 
by Pennsylvania on the first stage of its 
turnpike. 

In the area of bridge engineering, 
during the construction of the Potomac 
River Bridge in 1940, he invented, and 
later patented, a new method of build- 
ing bridge supports. 

Steel piles were driven into bedrock, 
sometimes 200 feet below water level, 
to hold the concrete supports which 
appear to be the sole foundations of 
the structure. 

Beginning with the Greiner firm as 
an engineer in 1919, Mr. Allen assumed 
more and more responsibility until he 
was named a junior partner by John E. 
Greiner in 1937. Five years later he 
became the firm's senior partner upon 
the death of Mr. Greiner. 

Among the toll roads handled by the 
firm are the Ohio and Indiana Turn- 
pikes and a portion of the New Jersey 
Turnpike. Under Mr. Allen's direction, 
the firm was a collaborator on Friend- 
ship International Airport and designed 
Boston's Mystic River Bridge. 

Surviving are his wife, the former 
Margaret Burke; three sons, Charles B., 
John G. and Herschel H. Allen, Jr.; two 
daughters, Mrs. William F. Babcock and 
Mrs. Robert A. McGrain; a brother, 
Wendell D. Allen; nineteen grandchil- 
ren, and a greatgrandchild. 




Dr. George E. Clendenin, '59, promi- 
nent Washington (D.C.) area dental 
surgeon and civic leader, and a mem- 
ber of the Alumni Council, was injured 
fatally in a chain reaction accident on 
a Santa Barbara, California County 
highway, in mid-November. 

The California Highway Patrol said 
Dr. Clendenin was standing near his 
stalled car by the side of U. S. 101 
about three miles north of Buellton 
when he was struck by a car. 

The patrol said 
the driver of the 
car was slowing 
down to see if she 
could help Dr. 
Clendenin and 
her car was struck 
in the rear by an- 
other auto, pro- 
pelling her vehicle 
into the dentist. 
Dr. Clendenin 
died 2!/2 hours after the accident, fol- 
lowing open-heart surgery at St. Francis 
Hospital in Santa Barbara. 

Only the Friday before, Dr. Clendenin 
had been named president-elect of the 
International College of Dentists, United 
States section. He had served as vice 
president for several years. 

He was born in Fayetteville, N. C, 
and received his degree from the Balti- 
more College of Dental Surgery of the 
University of Maryland in 1929. 

He had been a member of the attend- 
ing staff of Suburban Hospital for 15 
years, and had a private practice in 
Bethesda. 

Among his many professional ac- 
complishments, Dr. Clendenin was the 
founder of the Southern Maryland Den- 
tal Society, past president of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia Dental Society, where 
he had been an active member since 
1929, past president of the Board of 
Maryland State Dental Examiners, and 
past president of the Maryland State 
Dental Association. 

In addition, he was a delegate to the 
American College of Dentists, and the 
American Society of Clinical Hypnosis. 



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30 



The Maryland Magazine 



His civic activities include service on 
the board of directors of the Bethesda- 
Chevy Chase Chamber of Commerce, 
and past president of the Bethesda- 
Chevy Chase Rotary Club. 

He was also a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, a Shriner, Almas Temple, 
and a member of the Terrapin Club of 
University of Maryland. 

He leaves his wife, Marie M., of 
7820 Overhill Rd., Bethesda, a son. 
Dr. G. Gary, a dentist in practice with 
his father, and two daughters. Marge, 
a nurse on the ship Hope, and Mrs. 
Pat Wesendorff of Dallas, Tex. 

Col. William G. Draper, BPA "39, 
personal pilot and Air Force aide to 
former President Eisenhower, died at 
his home, Camp Springs, Maryland, 
in November. 

Col. Draper retired from the Air 
Force October 22, 1963, after suffering 
a severe heart attack while serving with 
a jet interceptor wing in Alaska. 

A native of Ohio, Col. Draper grew 
up in the Washington area, was grad- 
uated from Central High School and 
attended the University of Maryland 
before becoming one of six young men 
in the country to be chosen for special 
civilian pilot training. 

At 20 he was the youngest pilot to 
be accepted by Pan American Airways 
for training to ferry P-40 fighter planes 
to Africa. 

During World War II, he served as 
chief pilot for the "Fireball Line" be- 
tween Miami, Florida, and the China- 
Burma theater, and also ferried B-17 
bombers and other planes across the 
Atlantic. 

When the war ended, he was given 
three days to decide whether to apply 
for a permanent Air Force commission 
or to return to civilian life. He filled 
out the forms and was granted a perma- 
nent commission. 

One day in 1950, he was summoned 
without explanation to the office of Gen. 
Lauris Norstad at the Pentagon. After 
a series of questions, Norstad abruptly 
asked the young officer if he would 
like to become the pilot for Gen. Eisen- 
hower in his new job as Supreme Allied 
Commander for the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization. He said he would. 

For the next decade. Col. Draper 
went virtually everywhere Eisenhower 
did. One of the general's first acts after 
he became president was to name Col. 
Draper his personal pilot and Air Force 
aide. 

In 1959, Col. Draper took 11 weeks 
off from his duties at the White House 
to take special jet training. Later that 
year, he brought the presidency into 
the jet age at the controls of the presi- 
dent's new jet airliner. 

When Eisenhower left the White 
House in 1961, Col. Draper was as- 
signed to the interceptor wing in Alaska, 
where he served until his retirement. 

January-February, 1965 



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31 



In addition to his wife, Col. Draper 
leaves four children, Mary Ann, Jimmy, 
William G., Jr. and Priscilla. 

A former Washington man was among 
the seven crew members killed in the 
crash of an Air Force C-133 Cargo- 
master at Goose Bay Air Force Base, 
Labrador. 

He was capt. charles lloyd Jenk- 
ins, Agr. '53, married and the father of 
three children, co-pilot of the plane. 

The giant four-engine cargo plane 
was based at Dover (Del.) Air Force 
Base. It was heading for Sondrestrom, 
Greenland, when it crashed wing-first, 
shortly after takeoff, and burned. A 
light snow was falling at the time of the 
crash. 

Jenkins had made his home in Dover, 
with his wife, Anne, and their three 
children. Jenkins was graduated from 
Anacostia High School in 1949. 

He was commissioned in the Air 
Force then upon graduation. 

William M. B. Mullett, A&S '38, a 
director of the Washington Board of 
Trade and senior vice president of the 
Washington advertising concern of Kal, 
Ehrlich & Merrick, Inc., died after a 
heart attack at his home, in Bethesda. 
He was 49. 

Mr. Mullett joined the advertising 
agency as a junior account executive 
in 1938. 

He remained with the concern until 
his death, except for five years' service 
as an Army officer during World War 
II. He was elected senior vice president 
and a director of Kal, Ehrlich & Mer- 
rick in March, 1960. 

Mr. Mullett was a past chairman of 
the Board of Trade's membership com- 
mittee and of its annual mid-winter 
dinner. In 1960 he received the Board's 
"Man of the Year" award. 

He was also a founder of Heroes, Inc., 
a fund set up this year to receive con- 
tributions for the families of Washing- 
ton policemen killed in the line of duty. 

He was a member of the Georgetown 
Kiwanis Club, the National Capital Area 
Council of the Boy Scouts of America, 
the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the 
Congressional Country Club. 

Dr. Joseph Piombino, Jr., d.d.s. '33, 
Baltimore dentist for about 30 years, 
died following a prolonged illness. He 
was 56. 

He was born in Italy, but came to this 
country when he was just 7 years old. 
His family settled in Bloomfield, N. J., 
and Dr. Piombino gained his early edu- 
cation in Bloomfield schools. 

After finishing his dental education 
at the University of Maryland's School 
of Dentistry, Dr. Piombino remained in 
Baltimore to establish his practice. 

Dr. Piombino belonged to the Amer- 
ican Dental Association, the Elks, the 
Fourth Degree of the Knights of Co- 



lumbus, the Cheese Club, the Appian 
Society and the Holy Name Society at 
St. James Catholic Church. 

Retired Marine Brig. Gen. Edward L. 
Pugh, Educ. '25, World War II Marine 
fighter pilot in the South Pacific and 
a star University of Maryland football 
player from 1921 to 1924, died of can- 
cer recently in a San Diego hospital. 

Born in Chevy Chase, Gen. Pugh was 
the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Ed- 
ward L. Pugh. His mother was outstand- 
ing in Catholic work and the Demo- 
cratic Party and his father was one of 
the first appointees to the Interstate 
Commerce Commission. 

Gen. Pugh was appointed a second 
lieutenant in the Marine Corps in 1925 
and was a student naval aviator in 1928 
after having served in the Marine Bar- 
racks in Washington, Parris Island and 
Quantico. 

He was assigned to the aircraft squad- 
ron with the Second Marine Brigade 
and served in Nicaragua in 1929 and 
1930. He was with the Fleet Marine 
Corps until his retirement in 1954. 

He attended McKinely High School 
and graduated from the University of 
Maryland in 1925. He captained the 
1924 football squad and the 1925 track 
team. 

The 1925 Maryland yearbook said 
of him: "Captain Ed Pugh, for four 
years a regular on the varsity and the 
unanimous choice for captain his senior 
year. Ed's hard plan . . . and able leader- 
ship have won him a lasting place in 
Maryland's Hall of Fame." 

Gen. Pugh was awarded the Legion 
of Merit for "superb leadership" with 
a Marine air fighter command in the 
South Pacific in 1943. 

His command was credited with 
downing more than 100 enemy planes 
in a single day's action in the New 
Georgia area while covering the ad- 
vance of ground troops. 

He leaves his wife, Mary; one son, 
Edward L. Ill, and four daughters, 
Mother Marie and Sarah, all of the 
home address, and Mary Elizabeth, of 
Louisiana, and Mrs. Emily DeCesare, 
of Kentucky; three brothers, Montgom- 
ery County Circuit Court Judge James 
H. Pugh, of Rosemary Street, Chevy 
Chase; Lt. Col. (U. S. Army, retired) 
Michael O'Connor Pugh, of Pompano 
Beach, Fla., and Robert A. Pugh, of 
OIney, Md. 

Dr. Elbert Coy Reitzel, m.d. '17, 
specialist in psychiatry and neurology 
who served as a medical officer during 
World Wars I and II, died recently. 

Dr. Reitzel, who maintained a gen- 
eral practice in Baltimore between the 
wars, suffered a heart attack at his home. 

Retiring from the Navy as a captain 
in 1955 after fourteen years' service, 
he was the psychiatrist on the Board of 
Veterans Appeals in Washington until 
his final retirement two years ago. 



Born in Burlington, N. C, he re- 
ceived his undergraduate degree from 
Roanoke College and his M.D. degree 
in 1917, from the University of Mary- 
land Medical School. 

Dr. Reitzel served as an Army cap- 
tain during World War I and, while on 
active duty, took a residency in psy- 
chiatry and neurology at St. Elizabeth's 
Hospital in Washington. He also per- 
formed other post-graduate work at the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1930's. 

For a year following the war he was 
with the United States Public Health 
Service, assigned to Maryland mental 
institutions and health service hospitals 
in the Baltimore and Washington areas. 

Dr. Reitzel belonged to the American 
Psychiatric Association, the American 
Medical Association and other profes- 
sional groups. 

Dr. Richard Lee Silvester, Agr. '08, 
a Washington physician for 50 years, 
died the latter part of November, at his 
Washington home, of a heart attack. 

Dr. Silvester was born in Aquasco, 
and was graduated from the University 
of Maryland in 1908 while his father, 
Richard William Silvester, was the 
school's president. He attended Johns 
Hopkins Medical School in Baltimore 
and spent several years there following 
his graduation as a resident physician, 
before establishing practice there. 

During World War I, he was a lieu- 
tenant in the Navy Medical Corps. 

He was a member of St. Alban's 
Episcopal Church, the American Med- 
ical Association, the American College 
of Surgeons and the Medical Society 
of D. C. 

Dr. Silvester is survived by his wife 
Josephine of 3140 Klingle Road, N.W., 
Washington; a daughter, Mrs. Allen 
Kirkpatrick and four grandchildren. 

Dr. Alfred E. Theodore, d.d.s. '32, 
was was 54, died at Fort Howard Vet- 
erans Hospital after a two-month illness. 

Born in Baltimore, he was a graduate 
of City College and the University of 
Maryland School of Dentistry. 

A life member of Alpha Omega den- 
tal fraternity, he belonged to Gorgas 
Odontological Society and the Mary- 
land Free State Post of the Jewish War 
Veterans. 

Capt. William J. Walsh, A&S '51. was 
killed at Eglin Air Force Base in Flor- 
ida in early November. 

Capt. Walsh, an Air Force pilot, 
crashed during a training mission while 
piloting his Douglas Skyraider. 

Educated in the District of Columbia 
schools and graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in 1951, he served 
in the Air Force in Europe and the Far 
East. 

Survivors include his mother, Mrs. 
Delphine Walsh of 1313 Quincy St., 
N.E., and a sister, Mrs. Margaret Walsh 
Larsin, also of Washington. 



32 



The Maryland Magazine 




£ £„ rMm i.J*- . ,, ~*4 






AROUND THE WORLD - 1965 

September 17 to October 23 

Did you ever dream of going around the world? 

The great success of the Alumni European Tours and the great interest shown in 
other ventures have encouraged the Alumni Office to arrange a truly adventurous 
and exciting trip Around the World. Just a few of the highlights will include 
Honolulu, Tokyo, Nikko, Kyoto, Hong Kong, Bangkok, Calcutta, Banares, Agra 
(the Taj Mahal), Delhi, Istanbul, Athens, Madrid and Lisbon. Five memorable 
weeks, but there is more. There is an optional week extension which will include 
Cairo (the pyramids and Sphinx), Jerusalem, New Jerusalem, Tiberias, Nazareth, 
Haifa, Tel Aviv. 

This luxury trip will cost $2286.80 and the Middle East Extention will be an addi- 
tional $230.00. The price includes jet transportation, luxury hotels, sightseeing 
fees and most meals. 

For full details, write to Victor Holm, Alumni Office, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland, 20742. 

See the inside front cover. 









This little wafer of glass is one of the 
most significant telephone advances since 
the invention of the transistor. 

Reason ? It's a complete electrical circuit, 
ready to be slipped into a piece of communi- 
cations equipment. 

In the years to come, as it finds its way 
into new Bell System "hardware," it will 
save money and help hold down the cost of 
your telephone service. 

We deposit thin films of metal only four 
millionth* of an inch thick on a glass surface 
like that shown in the picture above. 

Because thin-film circuits are photo-etched 
on the glass, they can be made economically. 



And because a number of components 
and connections can be consolidated into one 
unit, thin-film circuitry is extremely reliable 
and precise. 

Thin-film technology has benefited from 
many important contributions by Bell Tele- 
phone Laboratories. It is now being applied 
to a number of Bell System products manu- 
factured by Western Electric. Among these 
are a new Electronic Central Office, a new 
high-speed data transmission system, and a 
new switchboard. 

Thin as the film is, its future is big in our 
plans to keep improving your telephone ser- 
vice while helping to hold down its cost. 




Bell System 



American Telephone and Telegraph Co. and Associated Companies 







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